Session 4:
• Concepts: Metadata
• Clipping layers and coordinates
• Finalizing maps
• Priority setting
Managing Spatial Data
• Metadata
– Provides information about a certain item's
content.
– For example, an image may includ...
Geographic Coordinate
System(GCS)
• Open Geospatial Consortium's Well-
Known Text Format (OGC WKT)
example: the Proj4 form...
Most common GCS=WGS84
• Uses the WGS84 spheroid, WGS84 as a
datum, and latitude and longitude as a
coordinate system.
• WG...
Go to notepad
• Browse your shapefiles in windows
explorer
• Open moz_adm0.prj
• Choose notepad to view
What we see in .prj file
There is much more here!
…. the short answer is that for “small
areas” like one country, Mozambique,
we are ok with the sy...
Clipping a province
• Now we will select a province to clip
First we click on the
moz_adm1 layer
Always first click on layer from which you
want to clip:
• for province layer, click ...
Select each
administrative district
with control key
Highlight MOZ_adm2
where the district
features are
Or use the attribute table to
highlight districts then clip
Clipping province with
coordinate data
Select features
with control key
You can also clip using
attribute table
• Similarly as done with the districts you
can look at the PCODE or province
code,...
Here we see that Tete is
represented by PCODE=5
Adding real hospital symbols
Now add symbols for postes
and centros
• Can you find a clinic symbol?
Now on to raster layers…
• First we need to go back to our plugins
and look for google street maps
• Then we need to see o...
Yikes! What
happened to our
map?
Now a test!
• Will our Niassa match the country
boundaries of Google?
• What do you think?
Now our biggest test
• We add Niassa hospitals!
• Will they be next to Lichinga and
Cuamba as represented by Google?
• Wha...
Export the map as image
• QGIS export happens in the print dialog
box. You can save your map as an
image or PDF
• Go to th...
Len De Groot, UC Berkeley School of Journalism QGIS basics for journalists
http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutor...
Export as image or as pdf
Len De Groot, UC Berkeley School of Journalism QGIS basics for journalists
http://multimedia.jou...
Resources:
• Frank Donnelly, Geospatial Data
Librarian, Baruch College CUNY
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/geoportal/p
racticu...
Prioritizing: where to begin?
Prioritization
• What would you prioritize to map first for
your project?
• How would you decide this?
Before you start, here are
some questions to ask
yourself
• What data are you tracking?
• What would like to map using QGI...
What would you like to see
mapped for your project?
• How many layers would you need?
• What type of layers would you need...
End Session and Entire
Training:
Thank you!
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
QGIS Module 4
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QGIS Module 4

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Module 4: Metadata, Clipping Layers & Coordinates, Finalizing Maps and Priority Setting

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QGIS Module 4

  1. 1. Session 4: • Concepts: Metadata • Clipping layers and coordinates • Finalizing maps • Priority setting
  2. 2. Managing Spatial Data • Metadata – Provides information about a certain item's content. – For example, an image may include metadata that describes how large the picture is, the color depth, the image resolution, when the image was created, and other data. – This can help you determine what spatial data may be more relevant or accurate for your project
  3. 3. Geographic Coordinate System(GCS) • Open Geospatial Consortium's Well- Known Text Format (OGC WKT) example: the Proj4 format and • .prj file format created by ESRI • What are we using?
  4. 4. Most common GCS=WGS84 • Uses the WGS84 spheroid, WGS84 as a datum, and latitude and longitude as a coordinate system. • WGS84 is used by the Global Positioning System of satellites by individual GPS units and online mapping applications. • Often called THE Geographic Coordinate System because so common
  5. 5. Go to notepad • Browse your shapefiles in windows explorer • Open moz_adm0.prj • Choose notepad to view
  6. 6. What we see in .prj file
  7. 7. There is much more here! …. the short answer is that for “small areas” like one country, Mozambique, we are ok with the system we are using now, i.e. shapefiles and coordinate systems used in this training. …the long answer is too long to fit on this slide BUT its important to check metadata if you are importing shapefiles from different sources.
  8. 8. Clipping a province • Now we will select a province to clip
  9. 9. First we click on the moz_adm1 layer Always first click on layer from which you want to clip: • for province layer, click on adm1 • for district layer, click on adm2, etc
  10. 10. Select each administrative district with control key
  11. 11. Highlight MOZ_adm2 where the district features are
  12. 12. Or use the attribute table to highlight districts then clip
  13. 13. Clipping province with coordinate data
  14. 14. Select features with control key
  15. 15. You can also clip using attribute table • Similarly as done with the districts you can look at the PCODE or province code, in this case, to see that you are highlighting all the hospitals of a province. Be sure to click on the top of the column (PCODE) to sort the column first before you highlight. Then proceed as before to clip the hospitals for the province.
  16. 16. Here we see that Tete is represented by PCODE=5
  17. 17. Adding real hospital symbols
  18. 18. Now add symbols for postes and centros • Can you find a clinic symbol?
  19. 19. Now on to raster layers… • First we need to go back to our plugins and look for google street maps • Then we need to see our data superimposed upon the google map layer
  20. 20. Yikes! What happened to our map?
  21. 21. Now a test! • Will our Niassa match the country boundaries of Google? • What do you think?
  22. 22. Now our biggest test • We add Niassa hospitals! • Will they be next to Lichinga and Cuamba as represented by Google? • What do you think?
  23. 23. Export the map as image • QGIS export happens in the print dialog box. You can save your map as an image or PDF • Go to the File menu and select New Print Composer. • You can bypass this step by simply saving as control+prtscrn and pasting to powerpoint or a word document.
  24. 24. Len De Groot, UC Berkeley School of Journalism QGIS basics for journalists http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/qgis-basics-journalists/
  25. 25. Export as image or as pdf Len De Groot, UC Berkeley School of Journalism QGIS basics for journalists http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/qgis-basics-journalists/
  26. 26. Resources: • Frank Donnelly, Geospatial Data Librarian, Baruch College CUNY http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/geoportal/p racticum/gis_prac_intro.html • Len De Groot, UC Berkeley School of Journalism QGIS basics for journalists • http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.ed u/tutorials/qgis-basics-journalists/
  27. 27. Prioritizing: where to begin?
  28. 28. Prioritization • What would you prioritize to map first for your project? • How would you decide this?
  29. 29. Before you start, here are some questions to ask yourself • What data are you tracking? • What would like to map using QGIS?
  30. 30. What would you like to see mapped for your project? • How many layers would you need? • What type of layers would you need? – Provincial/State level? – District level? – Health facilities? • Would you need to map distance? • What other data would you need to map?
  31. 31. End Session and Entire Training: Thank you!

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