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Community based participatory research to address late diagnosis of hiv among african americans and latinos in oakland
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Community based participatory research to address late diagnosis of hiv among african americans and latinos in oakland

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  • 1. Community Based Participatory Research to Address Late Diagnosis of HIVAmong African Americans and Latinos in OaklandInvestigator: Ifeoma UdohProject Partners: Jamila Shipp, Stephanie Cornwell (CALPEP); Christina Grijalva, ScottCarroll (La Clinica de la Raza); Meredith Minkler, Sandra McCoy (UC Berkeley School ofPublic Health)To support the development of community driven responses to the problem of late diagnosis inOakland, the Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation, in partnership with the University of California,Berkeley, and two well respected community based HIV programs in Oakland -- the CaliforniaPrevention and Education Project (CAL-PEP) and La Clinica de la Raza -- will work inpartnership on a study to explore the reasons for this phenomenon, and define solutions. Throughthe use the innovative process of community based participatory research (CBPR), the pilotproject will engage the Oakland community to understand the reasons for late diagnosis amongAfrican American and Latinos, and develop action-oriented solutions. By utilizing CBPRmethods, the pilot project seeks to merge the science of public health with community insightand understanding to develop solutions that have never before been tried in Oakland.The project objectives are:1) to describe the individual and structural barriers to earlier detection of HIV through in-depth key informant interviews with individuals who are late diagnosed as well keyOakland HIV/AIDS leaders who can give insight to understanding the HIV/AIDS socio-cultural factors affecting late diagnosis. A case-control chart review of all individualswho presented in Oakland with a late HIV/AIDS diagnosis within the last 5 years toassess “missed opportunities” for testing and entry into care;2) to make existing county and state-wide HIV testing and AIDS case data available to localcommunities for better understanding of late diagnosis and improved programming;3) to engage community and other HIV/AIDS stakeholders in reviewing findings from theactivities described above and to identify and/or develop community-driven responses toincrease early HIV detection and diagnosis, and;4) to pilot test the most promising of these community-driven leading to recommendedmodels of implementation in Oakland.