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Chinese Art Goes Digital

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To date, the stylistic protocols and default menu options programmed into almost all computer graphics and animation software have privileged distinctly Western styles of representation. This bias …

To date, the stylistic protocols and default menu options programmed into almost all computer graphics and animation software have privileged distinctly Western styles of representation. This bias has created difficulties for computer artists who wish to create works using non-Western techniques and visual elements. side from the potential technical benefits of such study, a comprehensive understanding and stylization of Feng’s work may also participate in a discussion of the relationship between tradition and novelty in the world of art.


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  • 1. Title: 2008 Technology in the Arts Conference Host institute: Carnegie Mellon University Dates: October 9-11, 2008 Section: October 11, 2008 Time slot: 13:45-15:00 Venue: Hilton, Pittsburgh © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 2. Chinese Art Goes Digital Presentor: Miss Zhang Jing (j.zh@alumni.cityu.edu.hk) Supervisor: Dr. Wong Kam-Wah (smkam@cityu.edu.hk) School of Creative Media City University of Hong Kong © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 3. Presentation flow ► Overall introduction ► Cartoon paintings in China ► Feng Zikai and the characteristics of his cartoon paintings ► Methodologies and discussion ► Conclusions and future investigations © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 4. Overall introduction ► Research aims To develop a non-photorealistic graphics program capable of simulating certain styles of Chinese brushwork painting, focusing on a case study of a subset of the work of Feng Zikai. ► Two phrases 1st, a systemic study of the sources, methods, and techniques of Feng Zikai’s cartoon paintings; 2nd, to build computer programs capable of digitizing Chinese artistic traditions, with Feng’s techniques as an initial template. ► Artistic significance © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 5. ► Non-Photorealistic Techniques (a) artistic media simulation; (b) user-assisted image creation; (c) automatic image creation. -- Bruse Gooch & Amy Gooch. Non-Photorealistic Rendering. 2001 © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 6. ► Cartoon paintings in China Grotesque figures (5,000- 3,000 B.C.) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 7. ► Cartoon paintings in China Stone status or relieves (11th Century B.C.) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 8. ► Cartoon paintings in China Cartoon style paintings during Ming and Qing period (1368-1912) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 9. ► Cartoon paintings in China Nian Hua (New Year Picture) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 10. Western comic strips © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 11. Linear Perspective © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 12. Linear Perspective One-point Perspective Three-point Perspective Two-point Perspective © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 13. Invisible Linear Perspective © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 14. Invisible Linear Perspective © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 15. ► Feng Zikai (1898-1975) an outstanding modern Chinese cartoonist as well as an accomplished essayist, calligrapher, scholar, musician, translator, and educator. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008 (1959)
  • 16. ►The characteristics of Feng's cartoon paintings Subject contents and style category Four periods Gushi Qi (a period of old poems), Ertong Qi (a period of children), Shehuixiang Qi (a period of social phenomena), Ziranxiang Qi (a period of natural phenomena) Three main categories of subject matters Human figures, Landscapes, Bird-and-flower (nature) subjects Two techniques: Gong Bi (delicate style), Xie Yi (expressive style) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 17. Delicate style © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 18. Expressive style © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 19. ►The characteristics of Feng's cartoon paintings Strokes’ expression Feng’s brush strokes = calligraphy + woodcut print “Chinese paintings are written?” Elliptical sketch style © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 20. Feng’s calligraphy © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 21. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 22. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 23. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 24. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 25. Feng’s Manhua © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 26. Feng’s woodcut print © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 27. Feng’s Manhua © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 28. ►The characteristics of Feng's cartoon paintings Detailed face analysis of Feng’s style Nose’s stylization Mouth’s stylization Eyes’ stylization © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 29. Nose’s stylization ► Left blank ► “L” shape ► Single line segment © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 30. ► “L” shape © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 31. ► Single line segment © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 32. Mouth’s stylization ► Left blank ► Upside down triangle ► “O” shape ► Double or single line segment(s) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 33. ► Mouth’s stylization © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 34. ► (Filled) “O” shape © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 35. ► Double or single line segment(s) © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 36. Eyes’ stylization ► Glasses without eyes ► Left blank ► Cross-face double horizontal lines ► Filled “O” Shape ► Double line segments ► Single line segments © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 37. ► Glasses without eyes © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 38. ► Left blank © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 39. ► Eyes' stylization © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 40. ► Filled “O” shape © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 41. ► Double line segments © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 42. ► Single line segments © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 43. ► Methodologies and discussion Overall diagrams © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 44. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 45. ► Methodologies and discussion Index of face’s values © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 46. ► Methodologies and discussion Nose’s stylization diagrams © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 47. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 48. ► Methodologies and discussion Mouth’s stylization diagrams © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 49. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 50. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 51. ► Methodologies and discussion Eyes’ stylization diagrams © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 52. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 53. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 54. © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 55. ► Conclusions and future investigation future directions 1st, to include the cloths’ pattern of Feng Zikai’s style; 2nd, to animate the brush strokes, i.e. to make the cartoon alive; 3rd, … © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008
  • 56. Thank you! © Zhang Jing,SCM,HKCityU,2008