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UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business
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UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business

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The UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business explores how companies attract, develop, and recruit women. Survey respondents included talent management professionals from all over the world.

The UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business explores how companies attract, develop, and recruit women. Survey respondents included talent management professionals from all over the world.

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  • 1. UNC Leadership Survey 2012: Women in Business Quantitative Report UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School Executive Development
  • 2. Table of ContentsIntroduction 3How to Read This Report 4Key Findings 5Section A: Current Organizational Climate 8Section B: Development of Women Leaders 15Section C: Demographics 29UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School 30UNC Executive Development 31Contact Information 32 2012 UNC Leadership Survey Proprietary & Confidential
  • 3. Introduction MethodologyObjectives • The questionnaire was developed by PerceptThis study was conducted to gain feedback from senior Research and the University of North Carolinabusiness leaders on: Kenan-Flagler Business School.• The development, career progress, work/life • The survey was administered via a web survey balance, mentoring, and organizational support for hosted by Percept Research. women in the workplace; • Percept Research processed all completed• The current presence of women in leadership roles; questionnaires, tabulated data, and developed• The effectiveness of recruiting, retaining, and graphical presentation of results. developing women executives; Segmentation• The importance of key performance metrics and • This report provides comparative analysis of the how women leaders perform in these areas; and following segments of interest. All questions• Perceived barriers to the advancement of women displayed in this report were mandatory with the into leadership roles. following number (N) of completed interviews. Total 925 Invites Response Male 181 Completes Sent Rate * Female 744Total 69,326 925 1.33% Talent Developers 631Domestic Talent 35,333 856 2.42%Development Managers Non-Talent Developers 294C-suite Executive 21,956 50 0.23% Title: C-Level 130International Talent 12,037 19 0.16% 206Development Managers Title: Vice President*Response Rate calculation does not take into account emails Title: Director 300returned as ‘undeliverable’ or ‘out of office’Fielding Overview Title: Manager 185• Fielding Started: 02/07/2012• Fielding Completed: 02/24/2012 Title: Other 84
  • 4. How to Read this ReportBar Charts Graphical Report• Overall ratings and data are presented in Segmentation is based on results to survey bar charts as means. Unless otherwise questions: noted, all responses are based on a 0-5 scale. • Male vs. Female: categorization based• Typically 0-1 is considered a poor rating on response to question C1 ‘What is while 4-5 is considered a high rating your gender? ‘ based on a 0-5 scale. • Talent Development Managers vs. Non• Response options are displayed in order Talent Development Managers: of decreasing mean rating for easier categorization based on response to interpretation in the bar charts. question C5 ‘Are you in a talent development function (e.g., HR, leadership development, human capital) in your organization?’ • Title: categorization based on response to question C4 ‘Which of the following best describes your title in your company?’
  • 5. Key Findings
  • 6. Key Findings• Respondents perceive a positive trend in the number of women holding senior leadership positions (see slide 9). Approximately half (48%) stated the number has increased over the past five years while 15% believe it has decreased. There is a correlation between level in organization and perception of the increase of women in leadership positions. Sixty percent of C-Suite Executives reported an increase over the last five years compared to 38% of Managers. When asked how the number of women holding senior leadership positions will change in the next five years the answers become less clear. While 40% of respondents believe the number will increase, 28% believe it will stay the same, and 30% don’t know if it will decrease, increase, or stay the same (slide 10). Men have a more positive outlook than their female counterparts. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of male respondents believe the number of women in leadership positions has increased over the past 5 years and 57% believe the number will continue to increase over the next 5 years. This is significantly higher than the 44% and 36%, respectively, reported by female respondents.• Only eleven percent of respondents believe their organizations are extremely effective in recruiting women executives while fourteen percent stated their companies were not at all effective (slide 11). The more senior the respondent the more positive the view on their company’s recruiting efforts. Over half (53%) of C-Suite Executives selected extremely or moderately effective compared to 28% of Managers. It should be noted that the majority of C-Suite Executives in this study were female (69%), so the gender and title comparisons can be viewed separately. Once women achieve these senior levels, companies are doing an effective job with retention. Fifty-seven percent of respondents believe their companies are extremely effective or moderately effective in retaining women executives (slide 12). Men believe their companies are more effective in retaining woman than women. While 73% of men believe their company is extremely or moderately effective only 52% of women feel similarly.
  • 7. Key Findings Continued• Companies continue to create an organizational climate that is doing a moderate job in its support of the development of women’s leaders. Over one-third (38%) of the respondents indicated the organizational climate at their companies moderately encourage the development of women leaders (slide14). This is similar to the 2010 Study by Mercer that found 43% of their respondents stating the same level of support (from their 2010 “Women’s Leadership Development Survey”). Slightly more respondents in the current study selected ‘to a small extent’ (28%) than ‘to a great extent’ (22%). As with the previous findings, men and C-Suite Executives have a more positive opinion of the support systems available to women executives.• Comparative analysis of public to private companies and company size did not yield any actionable statistical differences.
  • 8. Section A: Current Organizational Climate
  • 9. Section A: Current Organizational Climate How has the number of women holding senior leadership positions in your company changed in the past 5 years? (A1)100% 100% Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev80% 80% 65%60% 60% 44% 48% 48% 50% 36% 34% 35% 34%40% 40% 27% 17% 15% 15% 15%20% 20% 7% 1% 3% 2% 3% 2% 0% 0% Decreased Stayed the Increased Don’t know Decreased Stayed the Increased Don’t know same same • Overall, respondents indicated the number of 100% C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other women holding senior leadership positions within their company has increased over the 80% past five years. 60% 60% 52% • Gender: Significantly more men (65%) than 48% 48% women (44%) indicated an increase in the 39%37% 38% 40% 34%32% number of women holding leadership positions 29% within a company in the past five years. 17%17% 20% 11%14% 13% • Title: Slightly more C-Suite Executives (60%) 5% 2% 0% 0% 3% felt senior leadership positions held by women 0% has increased over the past five years Decreased Stayed the same Increased Don’t know compared to respondents holding other titles.
  • 10. Section A: Current Organizational Climate How will the number of women holding senior leadership positions in your company change in the next 5 years? (A2)100% 100% Public Private Males Females Total80% 80% 57% 60%60% 40% 41% 40% 36% 40%40% 33% 30% 31% 33% 29% 28% 27% 25% 22% 20%20% 20% 1% 2% 2% 1% 3% 0% 0% Decrease Stay the same Increase Don’t know Decrease Stay the same Increase Don’t know • Overall, respondents predict positive changes with 100% C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other the number of women holding senior leadership positions increasing within the next 5 years. 80% • Gender: Men (57%) had a significantly stronger outlook on the future of women holding leadership positions within a company compared to women 60% 51% (36%). 42% • Title: Vice Presidents felt the most optimistic in 36%37%33% 38%39% 40% 33% 33% terms of women holding senior leadership 24%27% 26%28% positions within their company in the next 5 years. 21% 22% • Results are similar for respondents working in 20% publicly owned and privately owned companies. 2% 2% 2% 1% 0% 0% Decrease Stay the same Increase Don’t know
  • 11. Section A: Current Organizational ClimateHow effective is your company in recruiting women executives? (A3) 17% Extremely effective 10% Extremely effective 9% 11% 11% 36% Moderately effective 27%Moderately effective 24% 24% 26% 24% 25% Somewhat effective 26% Somewhat effective 26% 26% Talent Dev 11% Males Slightly effective 18% Non Talent Dev Slightly effective 20% 20% 18% Females 7% 15% Not at all effective 16% Total Not at all effective 14% 13% 5% 5% Don’t know 5% Don’t know 5% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%• Overall, these findings indicate that there remains a significant need for more effective C-Suite recruitment strategies for women executives. Exec VP Director Manager Other• Gender: Males believe their companies are Extremely effective 18% 12% 8% 6% 13% more effective in recruiting woman than females. While 53% of men believe their Moderately effective 35% 22% 28% 22% 21% company is extremely or moderately effective Somewhat effective 23% 26% 28% 20% 27% only 33% of women feel similar. Slightly effective 11% 22% 15% 24% 23%• Title: There is a correlation between Not at all effective 6% 14% 16% 22% 8% management level and belief in effectiveness Don’t know 6% 4% 4% 6% 7% of recruiting. Over half (53%) of C-Suite Executives stated extremely or moderately effective compared to 28% among managers.
  • 12. Section A: Current Organizational Climate How effective is your company in retaining women executives? (A4) 35% 26% Extremely effective 22% Extremely effective 25% 22% 38% 33%Moderately effective 30% Moderately effective 32% 29% 15% 23%Somewhat effective 23% Somewhat effective 22% 20% Talent Dev 7% Males 11% Non Talent Dev Slightly effective 15% Slightly effective 13% Females 18% 1% 5% Not at all effective 6% Total Not at all effective 5% 6% 4% 2% Don’t know 3% Don’t know 3% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% • Overall, these findings indicate that companies are doing an effective job in retaining women executives. C-Suite • Gender: Males believe their companies are Exec VP Director Manager Other more effective in retaining woman than Extremely effective 39% 30% 23% 14% 25% females. While 73% of men believe their company is extremely or moderately effective Moderately effective 29% 32% 33% 30% 30% only 52% of women feel similar. Somewhat effective 18% 21% 22% 23% 24% • Title: As with recruiting, there is a correlation between management level and belief in Slightly effective 10% 12% 14% 18% 11% effectiveness of retention. Over two-thirds Not at all effective 2% 3% 5% 11% 4% (68%) of C-Suite Executives stated extremely or moderately effective compared to 44% Don’t know 2% 2% 3% 4% 7% among managers.
  • 13. Section A: Current Organizational Climate How effective is your company in the development of women executives? (A5) 15% Extremely effective 8% Extremely effective 6% 7% 8% 37% 30%Moderately effective 27% Moderately effective 29% 27% 25% 25%Somewhat effective 24% Somewhat effective 24% 23% Males Talent Dev 15% 21% Slightly effective 22% Slightly effective Non Talent Dev 20% Females 19% 4% Total 14% Not at all effective 19% Not at all effective 16% 20% 3% 1% Don’t know 2% Don’t know 2% 4% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% • Men (52%) and C-Suite Executives (49%) C-Suite feel their company has been extremely or Exec VP Director Manager Other moderately effective in the development of Extremely effective 11% 7% 7% 7% 8% women executives. Moderately effective 38% 31% 27% 23% 31% • Note that Managers (26%), Non Talent Somewhat effective 22% 26% 28% 18% 24% Development respondents (20%), and a Slightly effective 18% 19% 21% 23% 15% significant portion of women (19%) rated their company as not at all effective in Not at all effective 8% 14% 15% 26% 18% developing women executives compared to Don’t know 3% 2% 2% 2% 4% other groups.
  • 14. Section A: Current Organizational ClimateHow well does the organizational climate at your company encourage the development of women leaders? (A6)100% 100% Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev 80% 80% 60% 60% 45% 37% 38% 39% 40% 40% 32% 40% 31% 34% 28% 27% 22% 23% 21% 19% 20% 12% 10% 12% 20% 9% 11% 2% 3% 1% 1% 1% 3% 0% 0% Not at all To a small To a To a great Don’t know Not at all To a small To a To a great Don’t know extent moderate extent extent moderate extent• Overall, these findings indicate that extent extent companies are doing a moderate job at creating an organizational climate that encourages the development of women C-Suite leaders. Exec VP Director Manager Other• Gender: Not surprisingly, women have a more tempered outlook on the development Not at all 6% 10% 9% 14% 7% of women executives compared to men. To a small extent 17% 29% 30% 34% 26% Women are more likely to select “to a small extent” than “to a great extent.” To a moderate extent 41% 37% 38% 37% 39%• Title: Individuals within the higher levels To a great extent 35% 23% 22% 13% 25% organization are more likely to give their Don’t know 2% 0% 1% 3% 2% company higher marks in the development of women leaders.
  • 15. Section B: Development of Women Leaders
  • 16. Section B: Development of Women LeadersHow important is the development of women leaders on your company’s strategic agenda? (B1)100% 100% Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev80% 80%60% 52% 48% 60% 53% 46%40% 31% 40% 25% 27% 23% 23% 25% 16% 18% 19% 15% 20%20% 6% 10% 8% 9% 20% 7% 12% 1% 2% 3% 1% 0% 0% Top 3 Top 10 On the Not on the Don’t Know Top 3 Top 10 On the Not on the Don’t Know strategic strategic strategic strategic strategic strategic strategic strategic agenda item agenda item agenda, agenda agenda item agenda item agenda, agenda but not near but not near the top the top 5% • Overall, nearly half (48%) of respondents 2% Top 3 strategic agenda item 2% indicated that the development of women 1% leaders within their company was not on the 1% 22% strategic agenda. Very few respondents 19% Top 10 strategic agenda item 16% rated the development of women leaders as 17% C-Suite Exec a top 3 strategic agenda item. 14% 21% VP On the strategic agenda, 27% • Gender: A significantly higher percentage 24% Manager but not near the top 23% of women (52%) felt the development of 19% 51% Director women leaders was not a part of their 48% organization’s strategic agenda compared to Not on the strategic agenda 49% Other 49% men (31%). 43% 1% 4% Don’t Know 9% 11% 23% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
  • 17. Section B: Development of Women LeadersWhich of the following best describes your company’s approach to the development of women leaders? (B2) Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherNo initiatives or programs 46% 30% 50% 46% 48% 42% 45% 50% 50% 39%targeted to the needs of women leadersOffer some initiatives or programs 29% 37% 27% 30% 26% 29% 33% 27% 23% 36%Offer a specific leadership program for women 10% 17% 8% 10% 8% 8% 9% 10% 10% 8%Plan to offer some activities or 6% 4% 6% 6% 5% 5% 7% 7% 6% 4%programs within the next 12 monthsDon’t know 4% 7% 4% 3% 9% 5% 1% 2% 8% 8%Other (please specify) 5% 4% 5% 5% 4% 10% 5% 4% 3% 5% • Overall, the majority of respondents across This takeaway box refers to findings from all groups felt their organization had no question B3 on the next slide. initiatives in place to aid in developing • One half (50%) of respondent companies women leaders and few plans in developing have deployed flexible work arrangements activities within the next 12 months. within the last three years to identify, assess, • Significantly more women (50%) than men retain and development women leaders. (30%) indicated there were no initiatives or Other highly-selected options include programs to develop women. programs to encourage female networking • Of the 39% of respondents that stated there and role models, mentoring of junior women, were initiatives or programs for women, a and CEO & senior executive oversight of significantly lower percentage believe there gender diversity efforts. is a specific leadership program (10%) • Conversely, approximately one quarter of versus ‘some initiatives or programs’ (29%). companies (23%) have not undertaken any efforts for women leaders.
  • 18. Section B: Development of Women Leaders In the past 3 years, which efforts, if any, has your company undertaken to identify, assess, retain, and develop women leaders? Please select all that apply. (B3) Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherFlexible working arrangements 50% 55% 49% 52% 47% 61% 49% 50% 42% 51%Programs to encourage female networking and role 38% 51% 35% 40% 33% 42% 40% 38% 33% 40%modelsEncouragement for senior executives to mentor junior 31% 46% 27% 33% 27% 45% 33% 30% 24% 25%womenOversight by CEO and the executive team of gender 25% 32% 24% 28% 19% 29% 32% 23% 22% 18%diversity effortsAssessing indicators of the company’s performance in 24% 33% 22% 28% 17% 28% 25% 23% 24% 20%hiring, retaining, promoting, and developing womenSupport programs and facilities to help reconcile work 23% 34% 20% 23% 23% 31% 23% 22% 16% 29%and family lifePerformance evaluation systems that neutralize the 18% 30% 15% 20% 14% 25% 21% 16% 14% 21%impact of parental leaves or flexible workSkill-building programs developed specifically at women 13% 22% 11% 14% 12% 15% 15% 13% 11% 10%Programs to smooth transitions before, during, and 11% 22% 8% 12% 8% 19% 10% 7% 8% 17%after parental leavesInclusion of gender diversity indicators in executives’ 11% 20% 8% 11% 10% 12% 13% 7% 13% 12%performance reviewsGender-specific coaching programs 6% 12% 5% 7% 4% 11% 5% 6% 3% 4%Gender quotas in hiring, retaining, promoting, or 6% 11% 5% 6% 5% 4% 6% 5% 6% 8%developing womenSystematic requirement that at least one female 5% 8% 4% 5% 5% 5% 4% 5% 2% 6%candidate be in each promotion poolOther 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 5% 4% 4% 4% 5%No efforts undertaken for women leaders 23% 14% 25% 22% 27% 18% 23% 22% 29% 23%
  • 19. Section B: Development of Women Leaders If you have leadership programs for women in your organization, how effective are they? (B4)100% 100% Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev80% 80% 60% 57% 59%60% 60% 52% 45%40% 40% 21% 23% 22% 16% 17%20% 7% 10% 9% 11% 13% 20% 14% 13% 13% 5% 3% 3% 10% 7% 0% 1% 1% 3% 3% 0% 3% 0% 0% Not at all Slightly Somewhat Moderately Extremely Do not have Not at all Slightly effective Somewhat Moderately Extremely Do not have effective effective effective effective effective leadership effective effective effective effective leadership programs for programs for women women C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other Not at all effective 1% 1% 0% 2% 3% • Overall, the majority of respondents stated that their organizations do not have Slightly effective 8% 10% 11% 7% 8% leadership programs for women. This was a Somewhat effective 17% 15% 18% 16% 16% consistent trend across all segments. Of Moderately effective 17% 14% 10% 10% 23% those that do have programs, they are most Extremely effective 5% 4% 3% 2% 3% likely to be considered somewhat effective. Do not have leadership 52% 56% 59% 62% 47% programs for women
  • 20. Section B: Development of Women LeadersWhat are the biggest perceived barriers, if any, preventing women from advancing to the top management ofyour company? Please select up to 3 barriers. (B5) Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherLack of executive sponsor or mentor 37% 22% 41% 37% 37% 20% 42% 39% 41% 36%Absence of women role models 29% 21% 31% 30% 27% 16% 30% 26% 39% 30%Women not being in the pipeline long enough 27% 29% 26% 28% 24% 30% 28% 27% 28% 18%Lack of significant general management/line 25% 23% 26% 25% 25% 25% 30% 24% 24% 23%experienceExclusion from informal communication networks 21% 8% 24% 20% 23% 9% 28% 21% 22% 19%Requirement of a high level of availability for top 15% 7% 17% 14% 16% 13% 14% 17% 13% 14%managementLack of pro-family policies or support services (e.g., 11% 5% 13% 13% 9% 4% 9% 12% 17% 13%childcare, telecommuting)Other (please specify) 13% 13% 13% 12% 15% 15% 12% 14% 11% 14%No barriers exist at my company 16% 31% 13% 16% 16% 27% 13% 16% 11% 21% • Only 16% of respondents believe there are no barriers at their company. Significantly more men (31%) than women (13%) believe there are no barriers preventing women from advancing. • Significantly more C-Suite Executives (27%) than lower level respondents (VP – 13%, Director – 16%, Manager – 11%) perceive no barriers to advancement.
  • 21. Section B: Development of Women LeadersPlease rate the current state of your organization’s talent pool for the following women leadership roles. (B6)(Poor [1] = very small pool of women available for leadership roles, Excellent [5] = large pool of women available for leadership roles) 5 5 Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev 4 3.6 3.5 3.6 4 3.6 3.5 3.0 2.7 2.8 3 2.8 2.8 3 2.3 1.9 2.0 2.0 2.0 2 2 1 1 0 0 Manager Senior Leader (VP, C-Suite Exec Manager Senior Leader (VP, C-Suite Exec Director) Director) 2.1 • Respondents rated the talent pool for C-Suite Exec women managers within their organization 1.9 the highest across the roles (Senior Leader and C-Suite). These ratings, however, are Senior leader 2.9 Private still only slightly above the midpoint. (VP, Director) 2.7 • Overall, respondents gave poor ratings for having a small pool of women available for C-Suite roles within the company. Public • Respondents of both public and private 3.6 Manager companies gave significantly higher ratings 3.5 for having a larger manager talent pool compared to other leadership roles. 0 1 2 3 4 5
  • 22. Section B: Development of Women LeadersHow would you rate your company’s performance on the following efforts to develop women leaders? (B7)[5-Point Scale Rating: 1=Poor, 2=Fair, 3=Good, 4=Very Good, 5=Excellent] Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherRetaining women once they reach leadership levels 2.9 3.4 2.8 2.9 2.8 3.5 3.0 2.8 2.6 3.0Retaining women so that they reach leadership levels 2.7 3.3 2.5 2.7 2.6 3.3 2.8 2.6 2.3 2.7Having enough women in the leadership pipeline 2.3 2.7 2.3 2.4 2.3 2.6 2.4 2.3 2.1 2.5Having work-life programs that attract and retain 2.3 2.7 2.2 2.3 2.2 2.8 2.3 2.2 2.0 2.4womenAccelerating the development of women with early- 2.2 2.7 2.1 2.3 2.2 2.6 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.3career high potentialHaving women develop the full range of skills necessary 2.2 2.8 2.1 2.3 2.2 2.7 2.2 2.2 2.0 2.3for a senior leadership position• All attributes are rated below the midpoint. Respondents do not believe their company is doing an effective job on any of these attributes.• Title: The higher the level in the company, the higher the rating of company performance on these attributes.• Gender: Men give significantly higher ratings than women.
  • 23. Section B: Development of Women LeadersHow important are the following personal leadership competencies to business success? (B9)[5-Point Scale Rating: 1=Very Unimportant, 2=Unimportant, 3=Neither Important or Unimportant, 4=Important, 5=Very Important] Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherCommunicating effectively 4.8 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.8Creating a culture of accountability and performance 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6Building effective teams 4.6 4.5 4.6 4.5 4.6 4.6 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.7Being adaptive 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.6Developing others 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.4 4.5Leveraging diversity 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 4.0 4.1 • Communicating effectively, creating a culture of accountability and performance, building effective teams, and being adaptive are all rated as very important across all segments. • The remaining two attributes, developing others and leveraging diversity, are rated as important. • Men and women ranked the attributes in the same order of importance. • Talent Development Managers ranked the attributes in the same order of importance as respondents not in Talent Development roles.
  • 24. Section B: Development of Women LeadersHow do women leaders in your organization perform on the following personal leadership competencies? (B10)[5-Point Scale Rating: 1=Poor, 2=Fair, 3=Good, 4=Very Good, 5=Excellent] Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherCommunicating effectively 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8Being adaptive 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.5Creating a culture of accountability and performance 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.4Building effective teams 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.9 3.7 3.5 3.5 3.2Developing others 3.4 3.4 3.3 3.4 3.3 3.6 3.5 3.3 3.3 3.2Leveraging diversity 3.2 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.5 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.0 • Leveraging diversity, developing others, being adaptive, communicating effectively and building effective teams are all rated as excellent across all segments. • The remaining attribute, creating a culture of accountability and performance, are rated as very good. • Men gave women leaders in their organizations similar or slightly higher ratings than women on all attributes. • Talent Development Managers gave women leaders similar or slightly higher ratings than non Talent Development Managers on all attributes.
  • 25. Section B: Development of Women Leaders How important are the following organizational leadership competencies to business success? (B11) [5-Point Scale Rating: 1=Very Unimportant, 2=Unimportant, 3=Neither Important or Unimportant, 4=Important, 5=Very Important] 4.6 Executing a strategy 4.7 Executing a strategy 4.7 4.7 4.7 4.6 Making decisions 4.7 Making decisions 4.7 4.7 4.7 4.5 Males Managing change 4.6 Talent Dev Managing change 4.6 4.6 4.6 Females Non Talent Dev 4.5 Solving problems 4.6 Solving problems 4.6 Total 4.6 4.6 4.4 4.5Formulating a strategy 4.6 Formulating a strategy 4.5 4.6 4.2 4.3 Leading innovation 4.3 Leading innovation 4.3 4.4 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other Executing a strategy 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.7 Making decisions 4.7 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.8 Managing change 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.8 • All attributes were rated as very important by respondents. There are no significant Solving problems 4.5 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.6 difference between segments. Formulating a strategy 4.4 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.6 Leading innovation 4.2 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.4
  • 26. Section B: Development of Women Leaders How do women leaders in your organization perform on the following organizational leadership competencies?(B12) [5-Point Scale Rating: 1=Poor, 2=Fair, 3=Good, 4=Very Good, 5=Excellent] 4.1 4.1 Solving problems 4.1 Solving problems 4.1 4.0 3.9 3.9 Making decisions 3.8 Making decisions 3.8 3.7 3.9 Males 3.8 Executing a strategy 3.7 Executing a strategy Talent Dev 3.8 3.6 Females Non Talent Dev 3.7 3.6 Managing change 3.6 Managing change 3.6 Total 3.6 3.6 3.6Formulating a strategy 3.5 Formulating a strategy 3.5 3.5 3.4 3.2 Leading innovation 3.2 Leading innovation 3.2 3.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 C-Suite • Only one attribute, Solving problems, Exec VP Director Manager Other received a rating of very good or excellent. Solving problems 4.3 4.2 4.0 4.0 4.0 Making decisions 4.1 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.6 • Title: The higher the level of the individual, the higher the ratings on the performance of Executing a strategy 4.0 4.0 3.7 3.6 3.6 women leaders. While the differences are Managing change 3.9 3.7 3.5 3.5 3.5 not significant, the trend is present. Formulating a strategy 3.7 3.7 3.5 3.4 3.4 Leading innovation 3.6 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.1
  • 27. Section B: Development of Women LeadersWhat is the percentage of women in the C-suite officers of your company (i.e., CEO, CFO, COO, CLO, CIO, CTO, CMO, etc.)? (B13)What is the percentage of women in the upper management of your company (i.e. vice-presidents, managers, directors, etc.)? (B14) 100% 100% Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev 80% 80% 60% 60% 40% 40% 27% 26% 26% 27% 24% 16% 15% 15% 16% 15% 20% 20% 0% 0% Percentage of women in the Percentage of women in the Percentage of women in the Percentage of women in the C-suite officers of your upper management of your C-suite officers of your upper management of your company company company company • The general consensus of respondents is 100% C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other that there is a small percentage of women in C-Suite positions in their company. The 80% percentage of women is upper management is significantly higher, but still around 1 in 4. 60% • Title: As expected, C-Suite Executives 40% 33% 31% 29% 26% 26% indicated significantly higher management 17% 19% levels of women in the C-Suite. There is a 20% 14% 13% weak correlation between level in the 9% company and percentage of women in upper 0% management. Percentage of women in the Percentage of women in the C-suite officers of your company upper management of your company
  • 28. Section B: Development of Women LeadersHow would you rate the current economic performance of your company? (B15)[5-Point Scale Rating: 1=Poor, 2=Fair, 3=Good, 4=Very Good, 5=Excellent] 100% 100% Males Females Total Talent Dev Non Talent Dev 80% 80% 60% 60% 40% 35%33% 40% 36% 27%26%26% 28% 28% 30% 28% 27% 24%24% 25% 23% 20% 14%13%13% 20% 13% 13% 2% 3% 2% 2% 3% 0% 0% Poor Fair Good Very good Excellent Poor Fair Good Very good Excellent • Overall, the findings suggest that the current economic performance of respondent companies is very positive. • Vice Presidents gave the highest rating for the current economic performance of their organization.
  • 29. Section C: Demographics
  • 30. Section C: DemographicsWhat is your gender? (C1) Male Female 100% 82% 77% 80% 60% 40% 23% 18% 20% 0% Talent Dev Non Talent Dev Male Female 100% 84% 86% 79% 81% 80% 69% 60% 40% 31% 21% 19% 16% 14% 20% 0% C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other
  • 31. Section C: DemographicsWhat is your age? (C2) 50.4 47.9 Males Talent Dev Age (Years) 47.4 Age (Years) Females Non Talent Dev Total 48.3 48.0 0 20 40 60 80 0 20 40 60 80 51.5 49.8 C-Suite Exec VP Age (Years) 47.4 Director 45.6 Manager 46.5 Other 0 20 40 60 80
  • 32. Section C: Demographics What is the highest level of education you have achieved? (C3)100% Males Females Total 100% Talent Dev Non Talent Dev80% 80%60% 52% 60% 52% 48% 49% 43% 37% 35% 38%40% 29% 40% 34%20% 11% 10% 10% 20% 9% 12% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 3% 2% 1% 4% 0% 0% Some college Assoc. or Bachelor’s Master’s Doctorate / Some college Assoc. or Bachelor’s Master’s Doctorate / technical degree degree PHD technical degree degree PHD degree degree 100% C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other 80% 60% 52% 51% 48% 50% 40% 43% 39% 37% 40% 32% 32% 20% 14% 15% 5% 8% 7% 4% 2% 4% 2% 2% 1% 1% 4% 3% 0% 0% Some college Assoc. or technical Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree Doctorate / PHD degree
  • 33. Section C: DemographicsWhich of the following best describes your title in your company? (C4) 100% Males Females Total 80% 60% 40% 34% 32% 25% 22% 22% 28% 23% 22% 20% 20% 12% 14% 15% 9% 9% 9% 0% C-Suite Exec Vice Director Manager Other President 100% Talent Dev Non Talent Dev 80% 60% 40% 36% 27% 22%25% 22% 18% 20% 14%16% 15% 7% 0% C-Suite Exec Vice Director Manager Other President
  • 34. Section C: DemographicsAre you in a talent development function (e.g., HR, leadership development, human capital) in yourorganization? (C5) 38% No 30% 32% Males Females 62% Total Yes 70% 68% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 35% 35% No 26% C-Suite Exec 28% 50% VP Director 65% Manager 65% Yes 74% Other 72% 50% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
  • 35. Section C: Demographics What is the estimated the annual gross revenue for your company? Please indicate in U.S. dollars and include sales for the entire company/organization. (C6) Don’t know/Not sure 6% 9% More than $5 billion 21% 8% 20% 19% More than $5 billion 21% $1-$5 billion 30% 21% 28% 33% $1-$5 billion 29% 23% 30% $101-$999 million 23% 22% $101-$999 million 23% Talent Dev 23% $11-$100 million 8% 8% Males 9% $11-$100 million 8% Non Talent Dev 8% 3% 3% Females $5-$10 million $5-$10 million 2% 2% 3% Total 4% Less than $5 million 2% Less than $5 million 2% 4% 3% 3% Non-profit or not-for-profit 6%Non-profit or not-for-profit 6% 4% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% C-Suite Exec VP Director Manager Other Non-profit or not-for-profit 3% 3% 8% 4% 5% Less than $5 million 9% 0% 3% 2% 1% $5-$10 million 2% 2% 2% 5% 1% $11-$100 million 9% 4% 7% 9% 14% $101-$999 million 30% 25% 23% 20% 16% $1-$5 billion 36% 35% 30% 21% 30% More than $5 billion 7% 27% 21% 25% 14%
  • 36. Section C: Demographics How many employees work for your company? (C7) 31% 30%10,000 employees or more 31% 10,000 employees or more 31% 32% 14% 13%5,001 to 9,999 employees 15% 5,001 to 9,999 employees 15% 15% 13% 12%2,501 to 5,000 employees 16% 2,501 to 5,000 employees 17% 15% 15% Males Non Talent Dev1,001 to 2,500 employees 16% 1,001 to 2,500 employees 15% 16% Females 16% 9% 11% Talent Dev 501 to 1,000 employees 9% Total 501 to 1,000 employees 9% 8% 16% Less than 500 employees 17% Less than 500 employees 13% 11% 13% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 25% 39% 10,000 employees or more 31% 28% 31% 12% 15% 5,001 to 9,999 employees 17% 15% 12% C-Suite Exec 15% 17% 2,501 to 5,000 employees 13% VP 17% 15% 18% Director 13% 1,001 to 2,500 employees 18% 15% 13% Manager 7% 6% 501 to 1,000 employees 9% Other 11% 14% 24% 11% Less than 500 employees 12% 11% 13% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
  • 37. Section C: Demographics What type of company? (C8) 45% 42%Private 42% Private 43% 43% Males Talent Dev Females 55% Non Talent Dev Total 58% Public 58% Public 57% 57% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 42% 42% Private 44% Other 32% 58% Manager Director 58% VP 58% Public 56% C-Suite Exec 68% 42% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
  • 38. Section C: DemographicsWhat is your country of residence (C9) [Top 5 mentions] Non Talent Talent C-Suite Total Males Females Dev Dev Exec VP Director Manager OtherUnited States 92% 82% 94% 93% 91% 90% 93% 94% 92% 87%India 2% 7% 1% 2% 2% 5% 1% 2% 2% 2%Canada 2% 0% 2% 2% 1% 1% 4% 2% 1% 2%Brazil 1% 4% 0% 1% 1% 2% 0% 1% 1% 1%China 1% 1% 1% 0% 1% 1% 0% 0% 2% 2%
  • 39. UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School• The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first state university, is a leader in educational excellence, consistently ranking among the top five best public universities.• UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School is ranked among the top 20 in the United States for executive and full-time MBA programs and provides: – Research with business impact from renowned faculty whose work is shaping the future of business – Teaching from professors devoted to the growth of knowledge and analytical skills of students and executives – Experience and leadership skills gained in a challenging and supportive setting that helps people take career and company success to new levels
  • 40. UNC Executive Development• The University of North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School has delivered customized and open enrollment executive education programs with excellent results for over fifty years to a wide range of organizations.• UNC Executive Development has provided unique learning experiences to create solutions for the business challenges facing our partners and participants. Our approach to program design and delivery teaches the way executives learn most effectively – by drawing upon the power of real- world, applicable experiences from our faculty and staff, and integrating the knowledge our participants share about the issues they face with new concepts and business strategies in programs designed to produce practical skills.• Clients consistently rank UNC Executive Education in the top 20, citing our partnership approach to program design, teaching effectiveness and customer service.
  • 41. Contact Us• Any media questions and requests should be directed to Allison Adams: Allison Adams Media Relations Director University of North Carolinas Kenan-Flagler Business School CB 3490 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3490 919.962.7235 aadams@unc.edu• Any questions regarding survey methodology should be directed to Kip Kelly: Kip Kelly Director of Marketing and Business Development UNC Executive Development University of North Carolinas Kenan-Flagler Business School 919.843.6061 kip_kelly@unc.edu

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