Working With FEMA
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Working With FEMA

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emergency mosquito control

emergency mosquito control

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Working With FEMA Working With FEMA Presentation Transcript

  • Working with FEMA Dealing with mosquito issues during and following a natural disaster 1
  • Rosmarie Kelly, PhD MPH Public Health Entomologist GDPH – 2 Peachtree St NW Atlanta, GA 30303 404-657-2604 (w) 404-408-1207 (c) rmkelly@dhr.state.ga.us http://health.state.ga.us/epi/zvbd/ http://www.Gamosquito.org 2 2
  • DISASTER It strikes anytime, anywhere. It takes many forms - a hurricane, an earthquake, a tornado, a flood, a fire or a hazardous spill, an act of nature or an act of terrorism. It builds over days or weeks, or hits suddenly, without warning. Every year, millions of Americans face disaster, and its terrifying consequences. 3
  • FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. 4
  • A Major Disaster Declaration usually follows these steps: • Local Government Responds, supplemented by neighboring communities and volunteer agencies. If overwhelmed, turn to the state for assistance; • The State Responds with state resources, such as the National Guard and state agencies; • Damage Assessment by local, state, federal, and volunteer organizations determines losses and recovery needs; • A Major Disaster Declaration is requested by the governor, based on the damage assessment, and an agreement to commit state funds and resources to the long-term recovery; • FEMA Evaluates the request and recommends action to the White House based on the disaster, the local community and the state's ability to recover; • The President approves the request or FEMA informs the governor it has been denied. This decision process could take a few hours or several weeks depending on the nature of the disaster. 5
  • First Response • This is the job of local government's emergency services with help from nearby municipalities, the state and volunteer agencies. • In a catastrophic disaster, and if the governor requests, federal resources can be mobilized through the US Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for search and rescue, electrical power, food, water, shelter and other basic human needs. 6
  • Emergency Declaration • A governor's request for a major disaster declaration could mean an infusion of federal funds, but the governor must also commit significant state funds and resources for recovery efforts. • This is more limited in scope and without the long-term federal recovery programs of a Major Disaster Declaration. 7
  • Major Disaster • Results from a hurricane, earthquake, flood, tornado or major fire that the President determines warrants supplemental federal aid. • The event must be clearly more than state or local governments can handle alone. • If declared, funding comes from the President's Disaster Relief Fund, which is managed by FEMA, and disaster aid programs of other participating federal agencies. 8
  • A Presidential Major Disaster Declaration puts into motion long-term federal recovery programs, some of which are matched by state programs, and designed to help disaster victims, businesses and public entities. 9
  • Emergency Vector Control (Overview) (1) Category B – emergency protective measures (2) Removal of health and safety hazards (a) Health hazard (b) Verification is required (c) Public health must be involved (3) Process (a) Contact – good to know who these people are before an emergency (i) Public Health Director (ii) County EMA Director (iii) State EMA Field Coordinator (b) Coordination between Public Health, Public Works, and Vector Control 10
  • Emergency protective measures are those activities undertaken by a community before, during, and following a disaster that are necessary to do one of the following: – eliminate or reduce an immediate threat to life, public health, or safety; or – eliminate or reduce an immediate threat of significant damage to improved public or private property through cost-effective measures. 11
  • Removal of health and safety hazards. Such activities may include the following: Vector control of rodents or insects when there is a serious health hazard. Verification of the threat by the Federal Centers for Disease Control or State or local health agencies in accordance with established ordinances is required. www.fema.gov/government/grant/pa/9523_10.shtm 12
  • Documentation • Most important thing you can do to assure reimbursement if monies become available – Overtime – Materials – Equipment • Equipment and Personnel must match – Truck - 8 hours – Operator - 8 hours 13
  • DOCUMENTS FOR VECTOR CONTROL  Surveillance Data - Current data and past 3 years covering same time period  Operational Data - Including all info that supports the Project Worksheet  equipment  personnel  pesticide  Post Surveillance Data – Desired but not necessary 14
  • THINGS TO CONSIDER Complete your own paperwork Provide Proof at time of submittal Document, Document, Document Include Complaint Info and Larvicide handed out to Citizens •Information helps show FEMA that the problem is too big for the county or the state to fix 15
  • Other Important info •FEMA will only reimburse for the increased operating cost for mosquito abatement. This is calculated by comparing the disaster related costs to the last three years of expenses for the same period. •Evidence of higher levels of mosquitoes in the disaster area following the event is needed. •FEMA will consult with the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases to evaluate a State's request for assistance under this policy. •You must be prepared to take action before reimbursement. http://www.fema.gov/ 16
  • FEMA will only reimburse a portion of the difference in your vector control costs, if they reimburse anything at all 17
  • The Emergency Process 18
  • NEED TO DO: • coordinate through the County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) • involve Joint Field Office • have County EMA contact GEMA SOC • draft request – NEED ASSISTANCE – NEED RESOURCES – list everything so that expenses and insurance are covered • forms – GEMA & FEMA – http://www.gema.ga.gov/ohsgemaweb.nsf/46f83d65829d0a69852571 1f004a23d7/d416ac1e8b40330885257145006d01d3?OpenDocument&Hi ghlight=0,forms – www.fema.gov/help/forms.shtm 19
  • BE PREPARED • Be sure your workers are safe • Collect all relevant documentation • Contact your local EMA • SURVEILLANCE • MOSQUITO CONTROL • If control is needed, you can not wait for FEMA 20
  • Public Health Declaration 21
  • collecting the data 22
  • Mosquito Surveillance Data TRAP Ps. Ps. SITE columbiae ciliata 1 3728 14 2 1513 1 3 1649 5 4 928 flood event 5 1876 22 6 2340 current mosquito population data include arboviral data arboviral data - http://oasis.state.ga.us/Arboviral/index_mosquito.asp 23
  • 3 Years of Mosquito Surveillance Data Trap Data 2006 Trap Data 2007 300 250 250 200 200 150 150 100 100 50 50 0 0 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Trap Data 2008 120 Mosquito surveillance data AND 100 (a) Arboviral information 80 (b) Work orders for mosquito control (c) Labor - Employee hours 60 (d) Equipment use documentation 40 (e) Pesticide use 20 0 1 2 3 4 24
  • SUMMARY OF COMPLETED STORM RESPONSE WORK ORDERS Work Order # Date Location Work Performed Labor Equipment Material Total Cost 4/1/2009 Route 1 Larvicide 04010021 $4,813 $3,636 $6,125 $14,574.00 4/2/2009 Route 2 Ground 04020022 $6,423.00 $5,236.00 $7,526.00 $19,185.00 4/2/2009 Route 3 Larvicide 04020030 $2,536.00 $1,526.00 $1,899.00 $5,961.00 4/3/2009 Route 4 Ground 04030060 $7,125.00 $6,523.00 $9,000.00 $22,648.00 4/3/2009 Route 5 Ariel 04030061 $5,269.00 $4,624.00 $5,796.00 $15,689.00 4/4/2009 Route 6 Ground 04040023 $7,200.00 $6,125.00 $3,654.00 $16,797.00 4/7/2009 Route 7 Ariel 04050065 $8,296.00 $7,695.00 $12,500.00 $28,491.00 4/7/2009 Route 8 Ground 04050066 $5,263.00 $4,100.00 $4,456.00 $13,819.00 4/8/2009 Route 9 Larvicide 04050070 $4,562.00 $3,879.00 $2,569.00 $11,010.00 4/9/2009 Route 10 Ground 04060080 $3,695.00 $3,100.00 $4,521.00 $11,316.00 Labor Equipment Materials Total Total Cost for Mosquito Control $55,182.00 $46,444 $53,525 $159,490.00 25
  • POST-SPRAY SURVEILLANCE control flood event 26 Include Identification Data
  • Other methods of collecting data • Landing Counts Information to Collect: Collector's Name County Site Date Time Location on Body For counts of less than one minute, multiply to get landings per minute. 27
  • ask your neighbors 45 Lowndes County, 2007 400 Glynn County, 2007 40 350 Ps. ciliata 300 landing counts 35 Ps. columbiae 30 250 Ps. ferox 25 200 20 150 15 100 10 50 5 0 8/10 8/11 8/12 8/13 8/14 8/15 8/16 8/17 8/18 8/19 8/20 8/1 8/2 8/3 8/4 8/5 8/6 8/7 8/8 8/9 0 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 28
  • Emergency Mosquito Surveillance Trailer EMERG E NCY MO SQU ITO SUR V EI LL AN C E T R A ILER USE P R OTOC OL S http://www.gamosquito.org/mosquitolinks.htm 29
  • CONTROL 30
  • Control Plan 31
  • Control Data Date Time Road Larvacide Briquets Adulticide Gallons 4/6/2009 8:00am Skipper Bridge Road 900 Griffin Road 7.5 Woodrow Lane 7.5 Coppage Road 7.5 Staten Road 900 Franklinville Road 900 Carter Drive 900 McMillan Circle 900 McMillan Road 900 Parker Place 900 Fiveash Road 7.5 Bethany Road 7.5 Thompson Road 7.5 Barb er Circle 7.5 Union Road 7.5 Franks Creek Road 7.5 Cole Road 7.5 Miller Bridge Road 7.5 New Road 900 Vickers Road 900 Vickers Circle 900 Thunderb owl Rd 1000 Val-Tech Road 7.5 32 10,000 Briquets 90 Gallons
  • WHEN IN DOUBT • don’t be afraid to ask for help • know your local emergency managment director • talk to mosquito control in surrounding counties • call the State entomologist 33
  • START NOW • the best way to be prepared for an emergency is to start now and hope you never need to use what you learn • come to the Georgia Mosquito Control Association meetings to keep up with new methods of surveillance and control and to meet your peers and industry reps 34
  • ANY QUESTIONS? 35