Floods

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Floods

  1. 1. Floods
  2. 2. Phenomenon when water goes out of control and destroys villages and cities with its strength called flood.
  3. 3.      Cooastal flooding Graundwater flooding River flooding Flash Flooding Sewer flooding
  4. 4.  Weather events: heavy rainfall and thunderstorms over a short period; high tide combined with stormy conditions.  Poor maintenance: faulty sewer networks; poor or insufficient drainage networks;  Poor maintenance: faulty sewer networks; inadequate maintenance of watercourses.
  5. 5. This is a type of flooding, where a river bursts or overtops its banks and floods the areas around it, is more common than coastal flooding in the UK. River flooding is generally caused by prolonged, extensive rain. Flooding can be worsened by melting snow. Flooding can also occur if the free flow of a river gets blocked by fallen trees, natural overgrowth or rubbish.
  6. 6. Heavy storms or other extreme weather conditions combined with high tides can cause sea levels to rise above normal, force sea water to the land and cause coastal flooding. defences need to be in place to safeguard life and property. The Environment Agency and SEPA constantly monitor sea levels and release flood warnings when required.
  7. 7.        Floods in China in 1931 St. Felix's Flood in Netherlands in 1930 Hanoi and Red River Delta flood in North Vietnam in 1970 Eastern Guatemala flood in 1949 Bangladesh monsoon rain 1972 St. Marcellus flood in Germany, Denmark and Netherlands in 1362 Vargas mudslide in Venezuela in 1999
  8. 8. THE END

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