Plymouth State University 2013

677 views

Published on

Slides for my presentation: thinking strategically about the future of education and technology.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
677
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) works with a diverse community of liberal arts colleges and universities. This national network is focused on developing a deep understanding of the undergraduate student experience, the impact of the broader technological environment on teaching and learning, and the future of liberal education.
  • Plymouth State University 2013

    1. 1. Communitiesof practiceResearchJoint projectsOutreach
    2. 2. Networkplatform: eventsf2f/onlinePartnershipsTranslation
    3. 3.  Extraordinary political or economic event Technology breakthrough (ex: AI, unrest)
    4. 4. MultiplesourcesShould belongitudinal
    5. 5. SocialnetworksIteratedresourcefeedsScannercontributescontent
    6. 6. Next 20 years?ScreeningInteractingSharingFlowingAccessingGenerating-Kevin KellyPattern recognition:Deductions fromscanning
    7. 7.  More Asian liberalarts campuses State universitygaming company Social media growthcontinues "Generation Screwed"vs seniors online Microsoft tablet Google US-sourceshardware More Asian thanHispanic immigrants Certification rising New OLI use cases Kickstarter continuesto grow One R1 tries to cutlibraries down Academic unions critdistance learningJuly 2012 scan sample
    8. 8.  British MOOCenterprise The United Statesbirthrate fell to itslowest level since1920 student-librarydisconnection academic socialmedia use cases cloud computingprice war printer sales stagnate Android dominatessmartphones 3d printing inStaples adjunct unionorganization enrolledundergraduatesdeclineJanuary 2013 scan sample
    9. 9.  Social media Cloud computing Mobile ecosystem AR Wearables Ebooks Gaming 3d printingGenerationaldividesOutsourcingvs onshoring
    10. 10.  MOOCboomtime Faculty (andunion) resistance Makermovement badges Demographics:race and youth Adjunctification Total enrollmentdecline Grad programbubbles
    11. 11. AssembleexpertsProbe foropinionsRank anddistill ideasReiterate
    12. 12. Time-to-Adoption Horizon:One Year or LessMassively Open OnlineCoursesTablet Computing
    13. 13. Time-to-Adoption Horizon:Two to Three YearsBig Data and LearningAnalyticsGame-Based Learning
    14. 14. Time-to-AdoptionHorizon: Four to Five Years3D PrintingWearable Technology
    15. 15.  Propositions in time  Shares to be traded
    16. 16.  Quant. + Qual. Affordances ofplay Continuous Distributedfeedback
    17. 17. Stories about futures Event and response Creativity Roles and times Emergent practices andpatterns
    18. 18. Integrate previous methods:Select drivers – environmentalscanIdentify trends – Delphi reportsTest trends - extrapolationTest propositions – predictionmarkets
    19. 19. Mark Weiser, 1988ff Example: "The Computer forthe Twenty-First Century"(1991)“The most profound technologies arethose that disappear. They weavethemselves into the fabric ofeveryday life until they areindistinguishable from it.”
    20. 20. First, the light stuff Museum tours GPS navigators (Garmin) Location services (Yelp)
    21. 21. Searchtheworld
    22. 22. Multimedia lives here
    23. 23. AR art
    24. 24. Gartner: end of themouseTouch screen (iOS)Handhelds (Wii)Nothing (Kinect)
    25. 25. Median age of gamers shoots past35Industry size comparable to musicImpacts on hardware, software,interfaces, other industriesLarge and growing diversity ofplatforms, topics, genres, niches,players
    26. 26. Anecdata: numberof FacebookCityVille players:(as of July 2012, http://www.appdata.com/?AFB_redir=1 )23,900,000
    27. 27. Gamesserious,public, andpolitical• Oiligarchy, Molle Industries• Jetset, Persuasive Games• The Great Shakeout, California• DimensionM, Tabula Digita
    28. 28. Imperialgamification
    29. 29. (politicalandmundane)
    30. 30. Use games to impactsociety
    31. 31. 1. Phantom Learning2. Open world3. The Lost Decade4. The Serpent Digests aVery Large Mammal5. Renaissance
    32. 32. Post-tsunamiSchools are rareand distantInformation isplentiful andnearby
    33. 33. http://research.studentclearinghouse.org/files/TermEnrollmentReport-Spring2013.pdf
    34. 34. Information on demandInstructors, peers “ “Grading outsourcedMultimedia: social,personalized
    35. 35. InstitutionsFunction: contentsupplementsFaculty: adjunct rōninAccreditation: online,multiple, display-based
    36. 36. InstitutionsLibrary: mediaproduction campProfessionaldevelopment: via socialmedia
    37. 37. Students spent more time in K-12with online classes than face-to-face onesK-12 as social center, workingparent support spacesLibraries are softwareBuildings without AR look naked
    38. 38. No good categorical name:…which sometimesindicates the future
    39. 39. Opencontent,open access,open source• Very Web-centric
    40. 40. Global conversationsincrease, filter bubble popsMore access, moreinformationLots of creativity
    41. 41. Information prices dropFaculty creativity, flexibilitygrowIT “ “ “Academic contentunleashed on the world
    42. 42. Industries collapseAuthorship mysteriousSome low quality tech(videoconf.)Some higher costsMore malware + less privacy
    43. 43. Tech challengesOutsourcing and offshoringPLE beats LMSCrowdsourcing faculty workInformation literacy central
    44. 44. Internet has always beenopenWeb <> moneyOnline identity has alwaysbeen fictional, playful
    45. 45. Mediabattles
    46. 46. Higher education landscape:Two Cultures redux: STEM vsNew LeftAdjunct faculty 95%Public institutions’ shrunkenfootprintsScholarly publication 1/3rd 2000level
    47. 47. Higher education landscape:Accreditation: the sourceof closuresLibraries: rare and/orsmallerProfessional development:distance, DiY
    48. 48.  Great Recession began in 1st grade One or more family members unemployed “ “ “ “ “ underemployed Public education has always been stretchedto breaking point/poor Public-private gap even wider Online learning can beat their schools “Library” denotes digital collection
    49. 49.  Economic growth returns to US(energy, medical, nanotech vs world) 17-22-year-old niche revitalized (K-12failure) Full-time faculty stabilize (AAUP-ALAstrike) Digital tech firewalled from class (i.e.,tv + film)
    50. 50. Higher education landscape:Supplemental rather thantransformative techLogistical instead of pedagogicaltechAcademics include tech in oldstructures (classes, publication)Reconfigured to protect IP
    51. 51. 18-year-olds were .pptproficient by 5th gradeSchools <> digital lifeThey find their parents’recollections of life beforethe web are oddly charming
    52. 52.  Economic growth returns to US(energy, medical, nanotech vs world) 17-22-year-old niche revitalized (K-12failure) Full-time faculty stabilize (AAUP-ALAstrike) Digital tech firewalled from class (i.e.,tv + film)
    53. 53. Higher education landscape:Supplemental rather thantransformative techLogistical instead of pedagogicaltechAcademics include tech in oldstructures (classes, publication)Reconfigured to protect IP
    54. 54. 18-year-olds were .pptproficient by 5th gradeSchools <> digital lifeThey find their parents’recollections of life beforethe web are oddly charming
    55. 55. Gamingworld
    56. 56. Classroom and courses Curriculum content Delivery mechanism Creating gamesPeacemaker,Impact GamesRevolution (viaJason Mittell)
    57. 57. •Joost Raessens and Jeffrey Goldstein, eds,Handbook of Computer Game Studies (MIT, 2005)•Frans Mayra, An Introduction to Game Studies(Sage, 2008)•Pat Harrigan and Noah Wardrip-Fruin, eds. ThirdPerson: Authoring and Exploring Vast Narratives(MIT, 2009)
    58. 58. Changes in hardware,softwarePart of undergraduate lifeLearning content, bothinformal and formalCareer paths
    59. 59. Higher education landscape:Accreditation: drives project-based,studio-style pedagogyLibraries: gaming production,archivingProfessional development: distance,DiYFaculty multimedia production is thenorm
    60. 60. Elsewhere in the world:War on IP ragesNostalgia waves for oldmediaCompeting storytellingschools
    61. 61. Most students identified withone+ game characters in K-12Leading game developers are aswell known as movie directorsMost of their work and school isgamified
    62. 62. 1. Phantom Learning2. Open world3. The Lost Decade4. The Serpent Digests aVery Large Mammal5. Renaissance
    63. 63. Renaissance: youth alreadythere“ : technology beyondbordersSerpent: faculty resistance
    64. 64. Serpent : corporatepower, manipulation oflaws too strongRen: small number ofpeople leading
    65. 65. Social division, stratification ->technological divide (socialblocking, self-blocking)Tech leapfroggingTech for fun, not material life
    66. 66. Persistence of teachersMultitaskingNew creativity might not leadto jobs, esp given economybased on old paradigms
    67. 67. New creativity might not leadto jobs, esp given economybased on old paradigmsOpen content: a cademiccontent not sought after
    68. 68. NITLEhttp://nitle.orgNITLE prediction markets gamehttp://markets.nitle.org/Bryan on Twitterhttp://twitter.com/BryanAlexander

    ×