CR T ICAL MA SS:A Colle ction ofVoic es Confront ingSex Traff icking
About the British CouncilThe British Council creates international opportunities for the people of the UK and other countr...
Contents	2	 Introduction: Paul Smith and Cora Bissett	5	Foreword: Baroness Goudie	6	 A Critical Review of Roadkill: Lyn Ga...
2INTRODUCTIONPaul Smith is the British Council Director USAThe British Council, around the world and here in the United St...
3Cora Bissett is an Actor, a Director, and is the Artistic Director ofPachamama ProductionsPhoto by Stephanie GibsonRoadki...
5FOREWORDBaroness Goudie is a senior member of the British House of Lordsand global advocate for the rights of women and c...
6A CRITICAL REVIEW OF ROADKILLLyn Gardner has been going to the theatre regularly since early infancy. She studiedDrama an...
7The young black girl in the white dresssitting a few seats away from me on thebus laid on by the Traverse theatre islittl...
85 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT HUMAN TRAFFICKINGSpecial to CNN (reprinted with permission)Amanda Kloer is an editor with Change.o...
93. It’s happening to people just like you.Human trafficking doesn’t discriminate on the basis of race, age, gender, or re...
10STOLEN VOICES, BY BIDISHABidisha is a writer, columnist, critic and BBC radio and TV broadcaster. She specialisesin the ...
11“The  police didn’t  believe that the trafficker had raped me. Hetold them he was my boyfriendand they believed him. And...
12“He raped and traffickeddozens of women andthey only gave himtwo years in prison, ofwhich he served half.”“They had [our...
13These quotes have haunted me for several years. They are from women who have beentrafficked, women who help survivors of...
14I wasvisitingmyboyfriendand thensome mencame in avan andtook meaway.“OL I S
15I am not exaggerating any of this and my words are nothing compared to the bodily,emotional and mental trauma experience...
16RESTORING CONFIDENCE, ENVISIONING THE FUTUREPrefaceEnvisioning the future can be hard, when trying to overcome the past....
17wanted to be a hair stylistwhen she was a girl, but shewas trafficked from Hondurasto the United States at the ageof 17....
18had dreams of becominga veterinarian when shewas younger, but she wastrafficked from Mexico toNew York by a criminalorga...
19Restorin gconf iden ce,envision ingthe futu reJimmy Lee is the Executive Director of Restore NYCRestore NYC’s mission is...
20Siddharth Kara, Fellow on Human Trafficking, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, HarvardKennedy School; Fellow on Force...
212. How are governments like the United States assistinginternational NGOs or putting pressure on foreigngovernments in c...
22CAASE: ENDING HARM, DEMANDING CHANGE IN CHICAGO AND BEYONDRachel Durchslag, Founder of the Chicago Alliance Against Sexu...
23Trafficking is a gruesome reality. It is the buying and selling of human beings throughforce, fraud or coercion. Traffic...
24FIVE WAYS TO STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKINGAND SEXUAL EXPLOITATION5IVE WAY STO S TOPEDUCATE YOURSELFLearn to recognize the signs...
25A PATH TO SERVICEI am sothankfulfor theroadI oncethoughtwasbroken,to nowbe agatewayto thosegreatestin need.A PATHTO SERV...
26A PATH TO SERVICEJessica Minhas is a speaker, journalist and producer on social justice activism, abuse, andsex traffick...
27For a long time I resented my childhood and everything that had happened. I was angry-at myself, and at those around me....
28YOUR SLA VERYFOO TPRINTMEASURE YOUR SLAVERY FOOTPRINTGo to slaveryfootprint.org to find out how many slaves work for you...
29The BusinessConsultant(male, age 37)New York28 slavesThe Nurse(female, age 26)Florida46 slavesThe ElectricalEngineer(mal...
30Chal lenge SlaveryTec h Con testSPOTLIGHT: CHALLENGE SLAVERY TECH CONTESTThe United States Agency for International Deve...
31Chal lenge SlaveryTec h Con testThe British Council asked the team a few questions about theirwinning project:Q: In a wo...
‘FUS RO DAH’32‘FUS RO DAH’Sarita, a survivor of international human trafficking.I am woman torn from home, from all that w...
33Time ticking no clock seen, routines copied and secrets seen.The hope leads to this, the moment, the one chance I get.A ...
Join the conversation as it unfolds on the Roadkill Forum:http://usa.britishcouncil.org/art/roadkill. Follow us onTwitter ...
Critical Mass: A Collection of Voices Confronting Sex Trafficking
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Critical Mass: A Collection of Voices Confronting Sex Trafficking

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In conjunction with the US theatrical debut of "Roadkill," the British Council presents an anthology of essays, poetry and photography about efforts to end sex trafficking. For more information about "Roadkill" and related public events, visit http://usa.britishcouncil.org/art/roadkill.

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Critical Mass: A Collection of Voices Confronting Sex Trafficking

  1. 1. CR T ICAL MA SS:A Colle ction ofVoic es Confront ingSex Traff icking
  2. 2. About the British CouncilThe British Council creates international opportunities for the people of the UK and other countries andbuilds trust between them worldwide. We are a Royal Charter charity, established as the UK’s internationalorganisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations. Our 7,000 staff in over 100 countries work withthousands of professionals and policy makers and millions of young people every year through English, arts,education and society programmes. We re-energize the transatlantic relationship and partner with US-basedorganisations to work on shared agendas worldwide.A quarter of our funding comes from a UK government grant, and we earn the rest from services whichcustomers pay for, education and development contracts we bid for, and from partnerships. For moreinformation, please visit: www.britishcouncil.org/usa. You can also keep in touch with the British Council onTwitter @usabritish and www.facebook.com/britishcouncilusa.About RoadkillIn 2010 award-winning actor and theater director Cora Bissett’s critically acclaimed work Roadkill, whichexposes the hidden world of sex trafficking, was the first production in Edinburgh Fringe history to win everymajor theater award. As part of the British Council Showcase in 2011, Roadkill again captured the hearts andminds of audiences from around the world.In 2013 Roadkill has its US premiere In Chicago and New York presented by Chicago Shakespeare Theater andSt. Ann’s Warehouse, two of America’s leading producers, presenters and commissioners of innovative globaltheatrical events.Roadkill, produced by Pachamama Productions and Richard Jordan Productions in association with TraverseTheatre, is based on a real-life encounter with a young woman from Benin City, Nigeria, who has been traffickedto Scotland. Staged in a seemingly average apartment, the site-specific nature of the work places the audiencein the young woman’s world to witness at close quarters how her hopes of a new life are turned into violentscenes of rape, brutality and captivity in the sleazy world of sex trafficking. Together with strong writing andexcellent performances from the cast, this groundbreaking production is a deeply affecting work which takeseven the most seasoned theater goers on an insightful journey beyond their comfort zones.CREATIVE TEAM | Directed by Cora Bissett | Text by Stef Smith | Assistant Director/Sound Artist, Harry Wilson| Designed by Jess Brettle | Digital Media Artist, Kim Beveridge | Animation Artist, Marta Mackova | LightingDesign by Paul Sorley | CAST | Mercy Ojelade, Adura Onashile, John KazekPictured above: Mercy Ojelade | All photos by Tim MorozzoABOUT THIS PUBLICATIONThe British Council highlights the best of UK culture in a spirit of cultural exchange, so we are delighted toorganize and support a public program to engage wider and diverse audiences to examine the issues ofhuman and sex trafficking. Viewing these problems through a cultural relations lens underscores the complexcauses at their roots, such as globalization and cultural beliefs, and the collective solutions they require, suchas education and capacity building from all the societies involved. The arts are an ideal vehicle for dialogue,and this publication of essays, poetry, interviews and portraits commissioned from or submitted by leadingadvocates, academics, artists and survivors helps to contextualize the performance and broaden audiences’understanding of and public engagement with the issues of human and sex trafficking dramatized in Roadkill.Join the conversation as it unfolds on the Roadkill Forum:http://usa.britishcouncil.org/art/roadkill. Follow us onTwitter (@usaBritish and #Roadkill13) and Tumblr (#Roadkill13)
  3. 3. Contents 2 Introduction: Paul Smith and Cora Bissett 5 Foreword: Baroness Goudie 6 A Critical Review of Roadkill: Lyn Gardner, The Guardian 8 5 Things to Know About Human Trafficking: Amanda Kloer, Change.Org with CNN Freedom Project10 Stolen Voices: Bidisha 16 Restoring Confidence, Envisioning the Future: British Council in collaboration with Restore NYC20 Interview: Siddharth Kara, Harvard Kennedy School22 CAASE: Ending Harm, Demanding Change in Chicago and Beyond: Rachel Durchslag24 Five Ways to Stop Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation: Rachel Durchslag25 A Path to Service: Jessica Minhas, The Blind Project28 Measure Your Slavery Footprint30 Spotlight: Winner of the Challenge Slavery Tech Contest32 Fus Ro Dah: Sarita, Sex Trafficking Survivor Conten ts
  4. 4. 2INTRODUCTIONPaul Smith is the British Council Director USAThe British Council, around the world and here in the United States,engages strongly with civil society and community leaders, withdecision makers and opinion formers and, above all, with youngpeople to encourage them in social enterprise and in contributing toresolving issues of global importance. One way in which we do this isby championing powerful arts productions from the UK that depict and explore the ravagesof human crisis and critical aspects of cultural identity.Roadkill is a site-specific production that deeply immerses its audiences in the tragicnarrative it unfolds. As such, Roadkill’s innovative form and compelling content make thisappropriately the latest in our series of dramatic British productions which have recentlytoured the USA. These have included powerful and challenging productions exploringthe complex repercussions of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan, such as Black Watch fromEdinburgh and The Great Game: Afghanistan from London, which were well-received byAmerican audiences.Art has the power to transform perceptions, assumptions and attitudes and to build the willfor responsible action. Roadkill causes its audiences to experience the horrors endured bymillions of people—particularly women and children—who are trafficked for the purposeof sexual exploitation. It breaks the heart and compels determination for action. The 17th-century writer and historian Thomas Fuller wrote “If it were not for hopes, the heart wouldbreak;” Roadkill is a story that hangs on hope.  The British Council is on the ground in over 100 countries, many of which are affectedby the pressing issue of human trafficking. This anthology, which reveals perspectivesfrom survivors and advocates, helps tell the stories of real characters who, every day,experience this terrible reality. It is our hope that this US tour of Roadkill, and the publicevents that accompany it, will create a legacy of understanding, concern and commitment.Pictured Mercy Ojelade and Adura OnashileINTR ODUC TI ONPAUL SM ITH
  5. 5. 3Cora Bissett is an Actor, a Director, and is the Artistic Director ofPachamama ProductionsPhoto by Stephanie GibsonRoadkill began as an idea way back in 2009 when I came into contactwith a young woman who had been trafficked from Africa to Scotland forthe purposes of sexual exploitation, by an older woman.She stayed with me for a short while. Trafficking was an issue I knew a fair bit about, havingkept abreast of a series of articles which had appeared in The Scottish press in recentyears. But when a young woman quite literally lands on your doorstep, and wakens youwith her screams in the night, Trafficking ceases to be an ‘issue’ and becomes about anindividual, and in this case for me, a friend, someone sharing my home.  I wanted to letpeople know what was going on right now in our city. I wanted somehow to give people theexperience I had had of coming into such alarmingly close contact with this world whichexists quite literally on our doorstep, and that is how I settled upon the idea of putting theplay into a flat and transporting the audience there.The writer Stef Smith and I researched many similar stories and case studies and eventravelled to Italy where many Nigerian women are trafficked, and we interviewed peoplewho had escaped traffickers. From this array of stories, we created our script. And so‘Roadkill’ became an amalgamation of many women’s stories but sparked by that veryfirst meeting with one.By taking the audience to a location they did not know, and keeping them in a smallflat, they too were disorientated and trapped in a space, in the girl’s world for the durationof the piece. We shared the journey with her, rather than watch it comfortably from afar. Wewere in her world, and the impact of that was unprecedented.Roadkill made newspaper headlines, and trafficking was being discussed on TVshows, arts shows, and mainstream radio programmes. The profile it was raising wasunprecedented. People could not believe this was happening in Scotland, right here,right now.We gave the audience sheets at the end of each show with information on organisationsthey could contact should they like to donate, support, campaign, or take direct action. TheScottish Refugee Council was one of these places, and I was reliably informed that theyhad been inundated with calls and emails from audience members who wanted to help.Who wanted change. This was the power of being engaged in that story.Roadkill’s journey, like the journeys of countless thousands of girls around the globe is farfrom over. We have played in Paris, London, Glasgow, Edinburgh and now The U.S. Rathersadly, the story is as pertinent and current in every city around the world as it was when itfirst emerged that summer in Edinburgh. I hope that the spotlight it brought to bear in othercountries, can serve to do the same here in the U.S. and that in partnership with all theorganisations who are working so hard to eradicate this most awful of human rights abuses,we can focus on ways to inform, affect and activate our societies.  COR A BI SSET T
  6. 6. 5FOREWORDBaroness Goudie is a senior member of the British House of Lordsand global advocate for the rights of women and children. She is on theboard of Vital Voices, is involved in promoting gender equity with boththe G8 and G20 and is also the Chair of the Women Leaders’ Council toFight Human Trafficking at the United Nations. I became involved in human trafficking in the year 2000 when I attendeda meeting at the United Nations with Ambassador Melanne Veveer and Winch Yu, whoat the time were Director of Human Trafficking and Human Rights at Vital Voices. At thismeeting, my eyes were opened to the extent of human trafficking, the damage that is doneto human beings and the amount of money generated from these crimes. I then became amember of the Executive and Board of Vital Voices Global Partnership.Vital Voices is committed to fighting human trafficking around the world. The UN continuesto battle human trafficking under their Department of UNODC, which covers serious crimes,drugs, and human trafficking.As a member of The House of Lords, I have lobbied the British government’s efforts onhuman trafficking. Both the Palermo Convention and the EU Directive on Trafficking havesubsequently strengthened awareness and include cross border prosecutions. Humantrafficking is the trade of human beings for the purpose of sexual slavery or forced labor.Currently there are 21 million people forced into labor around the world including forcedsexual exploitation. Of that number, 5.5 million are children. Potential victims have beenidentified in over 90 countries.As the UK’s cultural relations organization, the British Council touches the lives of tens ofmillions of people around the world each year with its arts programming by supportingprojects that facilitate public engagement with and dialogue around important internationalissues such as social change, cultural identity and conflict and in the case of Roadkill,human trafficking. The human trafficking issue affects every country. Vital Voices has anexcellent toolkit available for download on the Internet, which will reach broader audiencesglobally.The timing is crucial as we are in an economic downturn, and it is easy for families to bepersuaded to sell their children, for women to be conned into domestic servitude and sexparlors, and for men to be taken and forced into labor in construction and fishing industries.Sex trafficking is not just about young women and girls, but it is also about boys and youngmen. There are 5.5 million children exploited around the world. This is a huge humanrights and healthcare issue. Those that are trafficked do not live long lives. It is critical forawareness to be raised at an inter-country level; at meetings such as the G8 and the G20.The United Kingdom and the United States are working diligently to have human rightsissue on the agenda. Every individual must lobby their governments both locally andnationally to fight for the eradication of human trafficking, because it will not go away byitself. The amount of money being made is in the billions. Trafficking is the second biggestorganized crime, the first being arms, followed by trafficking, then drugs. A human beingcan be used more than once. It is time to put an end to this crime.F OREW ORD
  7. 7. 6A CRITICAL REVIEW OF ROADKILLLyn Gardner has been going to the theatre regularly since early infancy. She studiedDrama and English at Kent University. She was a founder member of the City Limitscooperative where she edited the theatre section, before joining the Guardian.PrefaceIt’s almost three years since I first saw Roadkill, but if anything it is more vivid in my mindthan when I first saw it. So it should be. There are nights when I walk home though my partof London and look at the shrouded windows of houses and flats and wonder if there is aMary behind those curtained windows enduring appalling abuse.Sex trafficking is a growing international problem and one that most of us think has nothingto do with us. But no doubt many ordinary people said that about another kind of slavery inthe 18thand 19thcenturies. But it does have something to do with us, and one of the greatstrengths of Roadkill is that it reminds us that it does. It refuses to let us off the hook. Itsvery form—which places the audience in the role of voyeurs who sit passively and watchas terrible things unfold in front of us—reminds that we are all complicit in a system whichsees human beings merely as a commodity to be bought and traded.More than that, Cora Bissett’s uncompromising production makes us look hard and notlook away at something we might prefer not to know about or pretend doesn’t happen. IfRoadkill was performed in a theatre, it would be too easy to dismiss as a piece of fiction.We would be shocked while watching but when we left the theatre we would leave it thereas we headed back to our comfortable lives. But its intimacy, form and site-specific natureensure that we cannot just leave it behind.It is of course a piece of fiction, but one that is based on a reality that many young womenlike Mary are enduring every day. But it is more than that: it is a call to arms, an invitationto act and campaign, and most of all a reminder that if we simply turn a blind eye andrefuse to look at the problem full on, nothing will change and we are failing all the Marys,everywhere.   A CRITI CALRE VIEW6
  8. 8. 7The young black girl in the white dresssitting a few seats away from me on thebus laid on by the Traverse theatre islittle more than a child. She is chatteringexcitedly about the sights she sees to her“auntie”, a flashily dressed young woman,and to anyone who will listen. She hasnever seen buildings like this in Nigeria.Her enthusiasm bubbles over.A few minutes later, in Cora Bissett’soff-site production, now in a dingy flatoff Leith Walk, we see the same youngwoman again. Now her white dress istorn and bloody; she shakes. The lambhas been sacrificed on the altar of theprofitable sex trade. In the space of just afew minutes, she has lost her virginity, herinnocence, her passport, her past andher future. Over the next hour, we watchlike ghostly voyeurs as Mary’s life turnsinto hell on earth, and she is manipulatedby Martha, the auntie she thought wouldprotect her.It’s a familiar tale, and one that is beingtold elsewhere on the Fringe. But in thisuncompromising production, it’s up closeand personal. It doesn’t feel as if this isjust a play. Just as Mary cannot escapefrom the shuttered basement room wheremen inflict appalling violence on her bodyand then review her performance on theinternet as if they’re assessing a hotel orRoadkillLyn Gardner, The Guardian, Thursday 12, August 2010 (reprinted with permission)This is a critical review of the production Roadkill from 2010, the year the show wonAmnesty International’s “Freedom of Expression” Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.meal, so Bissett ensures that we cannotescape the appalling truth of Mary’s life,and all the trafficked young women likeher. The only way to escape is to shutyour eyes, to pretend it isn’t happening.None of us in the room can quite meeteach other’s eye.This is by no means a perfect production,but it is an almightily powerful one.There is some cunning use of video toconjure both real demons and those ofthe mind, and a soundscape that offersdistant children’s voices, and a snatchof Strange Fruit. There are remarkableperformances, too, from Mercy Ojelade asa Mary you want to cradle in your arms,Adura Onashile as the damaged andmanipulative Martha, and John Kazek asa series of men who abuse or fail Mary.Taking the show out of the theatre ismore than a mere gimmick, though itdoes also raise uncomfortable questionsabout theatre’s and the audience’sresponsibilities. Are we simply staring atthe animals in the zoo, or will we actuallyact after seeing the show; file it awayunder “interesting experience” or dosomething? The power of the piece is thatyou cannot forget the laughing girl in thewhite dress; nor should you. She’s outthere somewhere running for her life.
  9. 9. 85 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT HUMAN TRAFFICKINGSpecial to CNN (reprinted with permission)Amanda Kloer is an editor with Change.org, whereshe organizes and promotes campaigns to endhuman trafficking. She has created numerous reports,documentaries and training materials on human traffickingin the United States and around the world.Human trafficking might not be something we think about on a daily basis, but this crimeaffects the communities where we live, the products which we buy and the people whowe care about. Want to learn more? Here are the five most important things to know abouthuman trafficking:1. Human trafficking is slavery.Human trafficking is modern-day slavery. It involves one person controlling another andexploiting him or her for work. Like historical slavery, human trafficking is a business thatgenerates billions of dollars a year. But unlike historical slavery, human trafficking is notlegal anywhere in the world. Instead of being held by law, victims are trapped physically,psychologically, financially or emotionally by their traffickers.2. It’s happening where you live.Stories about human trafficking are often set in far-away places, like cities in Cambodia,small towns in Moldova, or rural parts of Brazil. But human trafficking happens in cities andtowns all over the world, including in the United States. Enslaved farmworkers have beenfound harvesting tomatoes in Florida and picking strawberries in California. Young girlshave been forced into prostitution in Toledo, Atlanta, Wichita, Los Angeles, and other citiesand towns across America. Women have been enslaved as domestic workers in homesin Maryland and New York. And human trafficking victims have been found working inrestaurants, hotels, nail salons, and shops in small towns and booming cities. Wherever youlive, chances are some form of human trafficking has taken place there.5 THIN GSTO KNOW
  10. 10. 93. It’s happening to people just like you.Human trafficking doesn’t discriminate on the basis of race, age, gender, or religion.Anyone can be a victim. Most of the human trafficking victims in the world are femaleand under 18, but men and older adults can be trafficking victims too. While poverty,lack of education, and belonging to a marginalized group are all factors that increaserisk of trafficking, victims of modern-day slavery have included children from middle-class families, women with college degrees, and people from dominant religious or ethnicgroups.4. Products you eat, wear, and use every day may have been madeby human trafficking victims.Human trafficking isn’t just in your town—it’s in your home, since human trafficking victimsare forced to make many of the products we use everyday, according to ProductsofSlavery.org. If your kitchen is stocked with rice, chocolate, fresh produce, fish, or coffee, thoseedibles might have been harvested by trafficking victims. If you’re wearing gold jewelry,athletic shoes, or cotton underwear, you might be wearing something made by slaves.And if your home contains a rug, a soccer ball, fresh flowers, a cell phone, or Christmasdecorations, then slavery is quite possibly in your house. Human trafficking in theproduction of consumer goods is so widespread, most people in America have worn,touched, or consumed a product of slavery at some point.5. We can stop human trafficking in our lifetime.The good news is not only that we can end human trafficking around the world, we can endit within a generation. But to achieve that goal, everyone needs to work together. Already,activists around the world are launching and winning campaigns to hold governments andcompanies accountable for human trafficking, create better laws, and prevent traffickingin their communities. You can start a campaign on Change.org to fight trafficking in yourcommunity. You can also fight trafficking by buying from companies that have transparentand slave-free supply chains, volunteering for or donating to organizations fightingtrafficking, and talking to your friends and family about the issue. Together, we can fighthuman trafficking … and win.
  11. 11. 10STOLEN VOICES, BY BIDISHABidisha is a writer, columnist, critic and BBC radio and TV broadcaster. She specialisesin the arts and culture, social justice issues and international affairs and is the author oftwo novels, an Italian travelogue and a Middle Eastern reportage. She writes regularly forthe broadsheets in the UK and internationally and has judged numerous literary prizesincluding the Orange Prize, the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize, the Comment Awards and thePolari Prize. Her fifth book, about asylum seekers and refugees, will be out in May 2014.She has just been made a trustee of the Booker Prize Foundation. She is currently writingher sixth book, a novel called Transformation Play, and doing outreach work in prisons.STOL EN VOIC ESThey toldme they’d goback to mycountry andkill myfamily.“
  12. 12. 11“The police didn’t believe that the trafficker had raped me. Hetold them he was my boyfriendand they believed him. And thenthey accused me of being atrafficker because they saidanother woman [who had beentrafficked]hadtoldthemIwas.”STOL N VOIC ES
  13. 13. 12“He raped and traffickeddozens of women andthey only gave himtwo years in prison, ofwhich he served half.”“They had [our daughter]there in a flat and said she wasfifteen, not twelve. We hadto drive around looking forher and they blocked off theroad with their cars so wecouldn’t drive down in. Whenwe told the men we’d callthe police they went aroundthe neighbourhood puttingup pictures of her, with herphone number, and we gothundreds of calls from menwanting her services. Whenwe told the police they toldus she’d gone with the menthrough her own choice.”“The police put me in prison for six monthsfor being here illegally when it was me whowas kidnapped, trafficked and raped.”STOL N V IC S“I pitched a TV series about trafficking, based onmy experiences working with trafficked women,and the executives didn’t commission it becausethey said trafficking didn’t exist.”“The journalistasked me, ‘Wereyou frightenedwhen you wereraped andtortured? Wereyou frightened?’A very famous,well-respectedjournalist. I hadto explain to him,gently, that’s notwhat you say toa woman who’s asurvivor. Not in thattone—wanting tobe titillated by theanswer and enjoythe woman’s pain.That is not the wayto ask a question.”
  14. 14. 13These quotes have haunted me for several years. They are from women who have beentrafficked, women who help survivors of trafficking and those who investigate, researchand challenge trafficking all over the world. At the events at which these women speak, wehave to be very careful: we protect identities, use pseudonyms, ban photographs and filmfootage in case the traffickers extract revenge, come and find the women, sabotage theinvestigations in the most brutal, violent and thuggish ways. What I have learnt from thesepowerful, distressing meetings and from unforgettable plays like Cora Bissett’s Roadkill, isthat trafficking, like all abuses of women, is common, not rare; accepted, not undergroundor taboo; international, not local; systematic, not exceptional; organised, not ad hoc.Trafficking, like all sex abuse, is mainstream.In 2009 the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime concluded that 79% of trafficking isfor sexual exploitation. The report covers 155 countries.To traffic women is to be part of a vast, complex and well-factored international crimeprocess which turns women into commodities and trades them, against their will, consent,dignity and knowledge, just like drugs, dirty money, weapons and contraband goodsare traded. This is done with the full knowledge and sometimes with the collusion of non-criminal organisations and networks including the police, politicians and local businesses.Trafficking involves extreme coercion (sometimes by older women offering younger womendomestic or secretarial work abroad); grooming, intimidation and pressure; outrightkidnapping; detention and deception; removal by force within or across countries; repeatedsevere beating, gang rape and other torture to break a woman mentally and physically; theloss of all markers of humanity including a woman’s name, clothes, language, money andpersonal items; sale, trade and rape between gangs of pimping men; being held hostagein a room or house or brothel, often in a completely alien country whose name or languagethey may well not know; the (realistic and true) threat of torture and murder if a woman triesto escape; and then usage, which is nothing more than rape, for weeks and months andyears, by johns, punters, users, exploiters and other ‘ordinary guys’ who think it’s okay torent and use a woman’s body for their own momentary gratification.“I was interviewing womenwho’d been trafficked. The TV was on and there was afamous telly chef on screen.The women freaked outbecause he was a client. In hispublic life he’s a patron of a domestic violence charity.”S OL N IC S
  15. 15. 14I wasvisitingmyboyfriendand thensome mencame in avan andtook meaway.“OL I S
  16. 16. 15I am not exaggerating any of this and my words are nothing compared to the bodily,emotional and mental trauma experienced by the hundreds of thousands of girls andwomen who experience it. To fully acknowledge the extent and harm of trafficking, wemust face the world’s harshest abuses, deepest hypocrisies and most long-standinginequalities. We must be ready to confront the ugliest realities, brutal personalities andviolent processes. Pioneering journalist Lydia Cacho’s recent book, Slavery Inc: The UntoldStory of International Sex Trafficking lays out in shocking and moving detail the extentand depth of this global problem, its endemic features and its interconnection with manyother kinds of international trade. It makes for aggrieving reading, and although there arecountless organisations, like the Poppy Project in the UK and Aapne Aap in India, whichhelp survivors of trafficking, too many people look away, cannot face reality or minimise itsgravity.In many ways the ‘untold story’ of trafficking is echoed in the stereotypes and practices ofall the other parts of society. We must be brave and self-critical enough to recognise thatthe misogynist values and systems which underpin trafficking are echoed far beyond itsnetworks. Whenever women are abused, the tendency is to blame, vilify and punish thevictim and excuse the perpetrator. When a perpetrator is punished—for rape, for murderof a partner, for stalking, for harassment, for abuse—any penalisation enforced by thecourts is markedly lenient. The police, the media, the judiciary, are passive, unenlightened,and unconcerned. When a woman is exploited for sexual and other labour we talk abouthow she ‘chose’ to do it, instead of realising that a choice made in the face of threats ofviolence, extreme poverty, blackmail, shame, fear, extreme inequality, is no choice at all.At the heart of the complexity is something very simple: a woman is a human being and notan object. The many survivors I have spoken to are the strongest human beings of all.O S“An investigative journalist for[a major UK broadsheet] saidhe’d researched trafficking and learnt that figures of traffickedwomen were grossly exaggerated.We contacted the main charitywhich helps trafficked women inthe UK. They said they hadn’t beencontacted by him.”
  17. 17. 16RESTORING CONFIDENCE, ENVISIONING THE FUTUREPrefaceEnvisioning the future can be hard, when trying to overcome the past.In addition to the visible scars that can serve as a reminder of physicalabuse, women who survive sex trafficking often carry invisible emotionaland spiritual scars. Feelings of self-worth and dignity built up throughadolescence can be demolished in seconds and can take a lifetime torebuild, and yet somehow survivors find the courage and confidenceto hope for a better life, to imagine themselves as they deserve to be—healthy and happy.The British Council was privileged to work with two recent graduates ofRestore NYC’s sex trafficking rehabilitation program. These remarkablewomen were treated to a makeover by a team of stylists and a celebrityphotographer to help restore their confidence and inspire them topursue their career dreams.Restorin gconf iden ce,envision ingthe futu re
  18. 18. 17wanted to be a hair stylistwhen she was a girl, but shewas trafficked from Hondurasto the United States at the ageof 17. She was romanced by aman who said he loved her butwas in fact part of an organiza-tion that trafficked vulnerablegirls and women. Before shecame to Restore, she was in apsychiatric ward before the FBIasked if Restore could providea home and services to her.She now has a job, has madegreat progress learning Eng-lish, and would like to own abig restaurant one day.“A”Restorin gconf iden ce,envision ingthe futu re
  19. 19. 18had dreams of becominga veterinarian when shewas younger, but she wastrafficked from Mexico toNew York by a criminalorganization. She alwaysdreamed of having a bigfamily and loving husbandand for the first time in manyyears thinks that this canindeed be true for her. Sheis not sure exactly what shewants to do long-term butis very happy right now withher job in the food servicesindustry—and the apartmentshe is about to move into.“L”Restorin gconf iden ce,envision ingthe futu re
  20. 20. 19Restorin gconf iden ce,envision ingthe futu reJimmy Lee is the Executive Director of Restore NYCRestore NYC’s mission is to end sex trafficking in New York and restore the well-being andindependence of foreign-national survivors.Long-term, safe housing is a critical gap in the aftercare of survivors. A late-2011 study byHofstra University states that 87% of trafficking victims in New York are in need of long-termhousing but only 4% actually find it.The Restore safehouses are the only such facilities in the region that provide long-termhousing for foreign-national survivors. Though our plan is that each survivor successfullytransition in 12 months, we do not have a hard-and-fast rule and a number of our safehousewomen have stayed for as long as 15 months. These homes are essential to the healingand successful future of many survivors. If a survivor is not able to be placed in oursafehouse, she is usually referred to a short-term (60-90 day) shelter focused on victims ofdomestic violence. In the worst case scenarios, some survivors actually go back to the onlysource of housing that they have known—that provided by their trafficker.Restore safehouses are designed to build community, foster healing and develop lifeskills so that each survivor will transition to a healthy and independent life. In addition tocustomized plans to bring healing and hope to each survivor, we provide ESL courses(both group and individual), yoga and art therapy, professional counseling, GEDpreparation, financial literacy training, job-readiness programs, and placement into part-time jobs with trusted businesses. We also bring in committed volunteers to cook meals ortake survivors out for a movie—to be sisters and family to each safehouse woman. Eachsurvivor will also have a mentor (“big sister”) that walks alongside her during her time in thesafehouse and after she graduates. This mentor will do everything from accompany her toappointments, help her with homework, be an informal counselor and friend, and help herthink about her future.You can learn more about Restore NYC by visiting their website http://restorenyc.org/
  21. 21. 20Siddharth Kara, Fellow on Human Trafficking, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, HarvardKennedy School; Fellow on Forced Labor, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights,Harvard School of Public Health1. The public (government) and voluntary (non-profits)sectors are hard at work on this issue, how might the private(businesses) sector with its resources and convening powerfurther strengthen the anti-trafficking movement?The business sector has a vital role to play in combating human trafficking around theworld. The fact of the matter is, countless global supply chains are tainted by various formsof modern-day slavery, and there is very little awareness of the extent to which these supplychains are tainted, let alone how they might be reliably cleansed. Countless productsthat we purchase every day may have supply chains that stretch to the far corners of theworld, where severely exploited labor might be used at various stages in the productionprocess. Supply chains that I have personally documented that are tainted by slave-likepractices for products sold in the U.S. include: rice, frozen shrimp, tea, coffee, hand-wovencarpets, apparel, granite, cubic zirconia, and others. The corporate sector must take amore aggressive stance in acknowledging these issues, supporting research to documentand analyze the extent of problem, and invest in reliable and sustained cleansing andcertification procedures. Doing so will allow consumers to make fully-informed choicesabout purchasing products that are free of human trafficking, forced labor, and child labor.Tracing Tea / Shutterstock.com3hreequesti ons
  22. 22. 212. How are governments like the United States assistinginternational NGOs or putting pressure on foreigngovernments in countries of origin and destination wherecorrupt officials actively facilitate trafficking abuses?The U.S. government is a global leader in advancing more effective efforts to combathuman trafficking. Through its Office to Monitor and Combat Human Trafficking, the U.S.Department of State supports research, awareness campaigns, and others activitiesintended to elevate the global response to human trafficking. The U.S. government alsoengages in important diplomatic and policy efforts around the world relating to humantrafficking. Several other U.S. government agencies, such as the Department of Labor,the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and others also all playimportant roles in combating human trafficking. In addition, the U.S. Trafficking VictimsProtection Act and its four reauthorizations are a model for national legislation on humantrafficking. In many countries, the issue of corruption is a particularly complex one, from thepolice, to border patrol, to the judiciary, and effecting real change in the near term remainsa challenge. Having said this, progress has certainly been made on the issue of corruptionin many of the countries that I have visited. While much remains to be done by the U.S.Government and other governments to tackle human trafficking more effectively, especiallyas relates to providing greater resources and increased international cooperation, the U.S.Government is certainly a global leader as far as current efforts are concerned.3. How has the global economic downturn affected the humantrafficking industry?This is an interesting question. There is limited data on the issue of how the recent globaleconomic downturn has affected levels of human trafficking around the world, but thereis certainly a general sense that the downturn has exacerbated the issue. In many cases,the downturn led to increased vulnerability of already-vulnerable populations, which in turnprecipitated increased desperation to find income-generating opportunities. Traffickersand other exploiters capitalized on this desperation to acquire new victims in a plethora ofsectors. Promises for reliable wages or other opportunities to migrate for a better life haveturned into one-way tickets into outright exploitation. At the same time, the global economicdownturn has also meant that many consumers in developed economies have needed tocut expenses. One way of doing so is to purchase the less expensive version of products.In many cases, these low-cost products are produced through some degree of laborexploitation, which in the extreme can be slave-like in nature. Increased demand for low-cost products has in turn stimulated demand by producers to cut costs of production, andlabor is a prime means of doing so. Thus, on both sides of the equation (production andconsumption) the global economic downturn has exacerbated levels of human trafficking,though it would be very useful for the field to have a more reliable sense of exactly how,why, and to what extent global economic downturns impact levels of human trafficking.The same must be said of other large-scale catastrophes, such as military strife andenvironmental disaster, each of which is almost always a harbinger of significant increasesin human trafficking from the affected areas.
  23. 23. 22CAASE: ENDING HARM, DEMANDING CHANGE IN CHICAGO AND BEYONDRachel Durchslag, Founder of the Chicago Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation (CAASE)I never would have imagined that a film could change the course of my life, but in 2003 Iwatched a film about human trafficking, and something inside of me changed. I learnedthat day of an injustice so profound that I had a hard time imagining the subject of the filmcould be true. I almost could not believe that women were being sexually enslaved in the21stcentury.When I got home, I could not stop thinking about what I had seen. The idea of someonebeing forced to endure sexual exploitation, while someone else profited, was unfathomable.When I learned that human trafficking was not only taking place internationally but also herein my home, I knew I needed to take action.In order to really understand the issue, I wanted to get out of my comfort zone and workwith victims abroad. In 2004, I traveled to both Thailand and India to work with youngchildren who had been kidnapped and sold by their families into sexual slavery. Seeingthe faces of these young people transformed me, and hearing the stories of what they hadendured inspired me to make ending sexual exploitation my life’s work. This became thespark for creating the Chicago Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation, or CAASE, a nonprofitdedicated to ending the perpetration of sexual harm.When working on CAASE’s mission, I thought back to my time abroad. I remembered thegirls I met, many of whom had scars covering their bodies from their ordeals. I visualizedthe child who had been set on fire by her trafficker. And the other girl whose body boreknife marks that covered all of her exposed skin.And then I thought about the faces I hadn’t seen—those of the men who had sexuallyexploited these girls and robbed them of their childhoods. I knew that as long as menwere willing to buy sex, creating demand, the sex trade would continue to flourish. Withoutaddressing demand, people would continue to be harmed.The sex trade industry is one of the ugliest manifestations of harmful human interactions.It occurs both internationally and domestically. Many of us have heard about internationaltrafficking. Information and depictions of sex trafficking have begun to appear in our moviesand public awareness campaigns. The United Nations helps us contextualize the extent ofthe problem by showing how trafficking is now the second largest money-making venture inthe world, and that it nets organized crime more than $12 billion a year. pictured Mercy Ojelade and John KazekEND ING HARM,
  24. 24. 23Trafficking is a gruesome reality. It is the buying and selling of human beings throughforce, fraud or coercion. Traffickers are strategic business people. They search out themost vulnerable individuals and entrap them in the sex trade through promises of jobs,education, or a relationship.So what does sex trafficking and sexual exploitation look like in our own community? InChicago alone, between 16,000 to 25,000 women and girls are impacted by the sex tradeindustry on any given day. Many Americans still fail to grasp the severity of the problem ona national and local level. This is in part due to the clandestine nature of prostitution, whichlargely takes place indoors and away from the public eye: in strip clubs, in hotel rooms, inmassage parlors, and in brothels.In Chicago alone, between 16,000 to 25,000women and girls are impacted by the sextrade industry on any given day.Our society also accepts the sex industry and glorifies pimping and prostitution. Theword “pimp” is now used to describe everything from juice, to cars, to parties at clubs, tobaby clothes. We have elevated this particular type of perpetrator to celebrity status. Andthe more we look at pimps as glamorous, the more the harms experienced by sexuallyexploited women and children go both unnoticed and unaddressed.Many people do not understand prostitution and sex trafficking as a pervasive form ofviolence against women. Instead, prostitution is seen as a choice, or even a legitimatecareer. Many who hold these beliefs are unaware of the harsh and profoundly disturbingrealities of the sex trade for the vast majority of those who are in it. While prostitution isan issue that impacts people of all ages, homeless youth are especially vulnerable. InChicago, one study shows that the average age of entry into prostitution is 16. Accordingto the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, one out of every three teens onthe street will be approached to be recruited into prostitution within 48 hours of runningaway. Homeless youth, many of whom have fled abusive homes, are often coerced intoprostitution out of dire emotional and financial circumstances.With all the harms and injustices faced by those in the sex trade, there are very fewresources that exist to help people exit prostitution. In Illinois there are no residentialprograms created specifically for adult survivors of the sex trade, and only eight bedsfor prostituted youth. We lack other needed services for prostituted individuals such assubstance abuse treatment, domestic violence programs, and employment opportunities.Creating resources to meet the needs of prostituted individuals is essential, but this is onlyone piece of the solution. The other piece is both simultaneously simple and complex:we must address the root cause of the issue—the demand, predominantly from men, topurchase the bodies of women and children. CAASE’s work focuses on addressing thisroot cause. Our legal services, advocacy, prevention and community engagement areall focused on holding perpetrators of sexual harm accountable for the harm they cause.We offer free legal representation to survivors of sexual assault and the sex trade. We arepassing laws and influencing policy to hold pimps, johns and traffickers accountable. Weare teaching young men about the realities of the sex trade, with the goal to prevent themfrom becoming patrons. And we are encouraging community engagement around theseissues through the arts. To learn more about our efforts, please visit www.caase.orgDEMAND INGCHAN GE
  25. 25. 24FIVE WAYS TO STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKINGAND SEXUAL EXPLOITATION5IVE WAY STO S TOPEDUCATE YOURSELFLearn to recognize the signs thatsomeone might be a victim oftrafficking: http://www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/recognizing-the-signs. If you believe someone isa victim of human trafficking, contactthe National Human TraffickingResource Center Hotline at1-888-3737-888.FOCUS LOCALSex trafficking wouldnot exist were there nota demand to purchasethe bodies of victims.Find out about whatyour city is doing tosuppress demand at:www.demandforum.net.Sign up for action alertsat change.org so thatyou can support futureinitiatives to end humantrafficking.LEND A HANDVolunteer your time orprofessional expertise bycontacting a local advocacyorganization to see how youcan help. For example, ifyou are a lawyer, you canprovide pro bono services totrafficking survivors. Find outabout organizations in yourstate working to end sex-trafficking by visiting:http://caase.org/our-alliances.DONATESurvivors of human and sex-trafficking are frequently inneed of clothing and otherdonations. Contact localorganizations to find out whatdonations they can accept.SPREAD THE WORDThough there recently has been moremedia attention regarding issues of humantrafficking, many people remain unaware ofthis human rights violation. You can host bookclubs, film screenings, utilize activist toolkits,and create other projects to raise awareness.ButI’mjustoneperson,whatcanI do?Contributedby RachelDurchslag,founder of theChicago AllianceAgainst SexualExploitation(CAASE)
  26. 26. 25A PATH TO SERVICEI am sothankfulfor theroadI oncethoughtwasbroken,to nowbe agatewayto thosegreatestin need.A PATHTO SERVICEPhoto: Jessica Minhas (left)with Samana, a survivorwho is part of the Voicesfor Change leadershipprogram at the Somaly MamFoundation.
  27. 27. 26A PATH TO SERVICEJessica Minhas is a speaker, journalist and producer on social justice activism, abuse, andsex trafficking. Jessica is on the team of the Blind Project. The Blind Project is a collectiveof passionate individuals uniting together, leveraging their unique talents to empowervictims and survivors of the commercial sex trade in Southeast Asia. Learn more atwww.theblindproject.comI have been working in the human rights field for over ten years. I started young—when Iwas 19. I guess you could say I am an accidental humanitarian, though I’m not sure if thereis such a thing. I think social injustice work finds you, rather than you finding it. The truth ofthe matter is, fighting for the rights of those who are vulnerable has so profoundly impactedmy life that I often have to stop and ask myself, “How did I become so blessed?”I was raised in the South by just my single white grandfather. We found ourselves in thispredicament after my biological parents abandoned my identical twin, Jennifer and mewhen we were six months old. It was then that my maternal grandparents courageouslystepped in and accepted custody of us, despite being well into their retirement. Just a few short years later, when Jennifer and I were nearly three years old, we wereinvolved in a deadly accident that claimed her life. As a way to cope, I believe, mygrandparents succumbed to an exponentially aggressive alcohol addiction that wouldeventually contribute to my grandmother’s death when I was nine years old.  My grandfather’s erratic anger towards me, likelyout of his own deep pain and grief, worsened my abilityto navigate the chaotic and terrifying household Ifound myself in.Left alone, my aging grandfather did his best to commit his life to me to ensure my future,but the sad reality was we were now by ourselves, and his alcoholism had become bothunpredictable and violent. As a 4th grader, I was now expected to fulfill the roles mygrandmother had as ‘lady of the house’. Cook, maid, emotional confidant and scapegoatwere now duties that replaced any sense of normalcy in my childhood. My grandfather’serratic anger towards me, likely out of his own deep pain and grief, worsened my ability tonavigate the chaotic and terrifying household I found myself in. Many times I expressed my fear and growing understanding that what I was experiencingat home was not actually supposed to be a part of anyone’s childhood. I frequently wentto my teachers, counselors at school, friends’ parents and neighbors asking for help, butwas met with a display of empathy, but an overwhelming unwillingness to intervene onmy behalf. Gradually, I learned that I was powerless to stop the emotional and physicalabuse at the hands of my struggling grandfather. Feeling isolated, alone, and trapped, Isuffocated for years under the weight of depression and thoughts of suicide. When I was 15, my grandfather fell gravely ill, and our care-giving roles reversed. His lifewas now placed in my hands. In between high school academics, cross-country practiceand play rehearsal, I tried my best to care for him on my own. He survived long enough tosee me turn 18, and graduate from high school, though I’m not sure how. Just a few weeksafter my graduation, he passed away. I was left an orphan. A PATHTO SERVI CE
  28. 28. 27For a long time I resented my childhood and everything that had happened. I was angry-at myself, and at those around me. I couldn’t make sense of all of those years of abuseand what the reason was. Yet, deep within me a strong desire to someday find someresemblance of a family motivated my commitment to search for my biological Indian roots. When I was presented with the opportunity to serve in India and Nepal with one of my bestfriends in college, I immediately said ‘yes’. On route to Nepal, we passed through Calcuttaand volunteered at an orphanage for children age 16 and under. When I innocently askedwhat happened to the girls when they aged out of care at 16, the staff responded thatunless they were married, or were fortunate enough to find work, they would likely be forcedinto sexual exploitation. This was the first time I had ever heard of the commercial sexualexploitation of children. To me, it was criminal for this small percentage of children rescuedoff the street, to later face such desperation that only selling themselves would enable theirsurvival. I couldn’t understand who would want to have sex with a child or how such anatrocity could even happen in a modern world. That single moment at this orphanage inCalcutta changed me.Looking back, I see clearly how my greatest sufferinghas, in fact, become my greatest blessing. My ownstruggles have given me a deep understanding,tenderness and empathy for the poor, the stranger,the orphan and the widow.I soon learned an overwhelming majority of sexually exploited youth are runaways orcastaways from dysfunctional homes where they have suffered physical, psychologicaland sexual abuse. I realized any one of those children could have been me. I was just asvulnerable; I too lacked a strong family and any source of support or encouragement. Iwas fortunate enough to have access to an education and to have never encountered apimp who could have coerced me into prostitution. Still, in a very small way, I saw piecesof myself in the stories of Calcutta’s victims. I could empathize because I shared the samefeelings of being forgotten and used. I remembered screaming for help and having mycry, just like theirs, go unnoticed. Suddenly, the resentment I carried for so long turnedinto a righteous indignation and fiery passion to help those trapped in sexual slavery. Thetragedies of my childhood are incomparable to the atrocities these children in Calcutta andmany others around the world face, but our shared vulnerability and helplessness drivesme to fight for them. I was exposed to the world of child sex slavery and I decided I wouldnever turn away. Looking back, I see clearly how my greatest suffering has, in fact, become my greatestblessing. My own struggles have given me a deep understanding, tenderness andempathy for the poor, the stranger, the orphan and the widow.  I am so thankful for the roadI once thought was broken, to now be a gateway to those greatest in need. I have learnedthat it is in the places where our hearts are broken, that we cultivate our ability to serveothers and love well. This is my story, but what is yours? Where is your heart broken? What gives you a righteousindignation? What gives you joy? What makes your heart come alive? Find this, and you willfind your truest self, and in doing so bring hope to those without justice, community andreconciliation. A PATHTO SERVI CE
  29. 29. 28YOUR SLA VERYFOO TPRINTMEASURE YOUR SLAVERY FOOTPRINTGo to slaveryfootprint.org to find out how many slaves work for you!The average person doesn’t comprehend his or her connection to modern-day slavery.Slavery Footprint helps map consumers’ connections to modern-day slavery by measuringtheir impact based on lifestyle choices—including everyday items they purchase or ownsuch as food, clothing, medicine, and electronics.Slaveà RawMaterialsàManufactureràBrandàYouHowdo youmeasureup?
  30. 30. 29The BusinessConsultant(male, age 37)New York28 slavesThe Nurse(female, age 26)Florida46 slavesThe ElectricalEngineer(male, age 25)San Francisco52 slavesThe Attorney(male, 63)Houston25 slavesThe Graphic Artist(male, age 47)Los Angeles81 slavesThe Teacher(female, age 31)Atlanta64 slavesThe Tech IndustryExecutive(female, 53)Minnesota98 slavesThe Stay-at-Home Mom(female, age 32)North Carolina35 slavesHere is a random sample of people from across the United States.YOUR SLA VERYFOO TPRINT
  31. 31. 30Chal lenge SlaveryTec h Con testSPOTLIGHT: CHALLENGE SLAVERY TECH CONTESTThe United States Agency for International Development (USAID) partnered with anti-trafficking organizations Free the Slaves, Not For Sale, Slavery Footprint, MTV Exit, andAbolition International for the Counter-Trafficking in Persons (C-TIP) Campus ChallengeTech Contest. Thousands of students from around the world were asked to come up witha creative technology solution to help further prevention and protection. The winners wereannounced at the end of March 2013, and were invited to share their proposals with donors,counter-trafficking organizations and technology professionals.WHO:The first-place winners of the Campus Challenge Tech Contest are Virginia Tech’sWes Williams, Kwamina Orleans-Pobee and Nick Montgomery.WHAT:The team’s online intervention tool AboliShop, which is a browser extension for GoogleChrome, makes information about the slavery impact of items available for purchase—basedon Not For Sale’s Free2Work ratings—accessible to Amazon.com’s shoppers. Consumerscan set their own search standards to prioritize ethically sourced and manufacturedproducts or can opt to purchase more socially conscious products in categories like appareland electronics based on the application’s product grades.See the AboliShop demo here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADP04eXQLq8
  32. 32. 31Chal lenge SlaveryTec h Con testThe British Council asked the team a few questions about theirwinning project:Q: In a world where people troll the web to find thebest deal on a particular item or comparable products,WHY doyou think consumers will choose the ethical purchase overthe unethical purchase, even if the socially conscious choicemight be more expensive?A: Many consumers have proven over the past few years to be interested in thesocial impact of their purchases, and we think that the primary reason we haven’t seena similar movement with slavery-aware consumerism is a lack of information. Abolishopseeks to remedy that. When consumers can see exactly how their choices are aidingor combatting modern day slavery, they are empowered to make a difference. Whilesome may continue to make purchases based only on price, we feel that the majority willrecognise that a few dollars is not worth perpetrating the slavery of another human being,and will shop accordingly.In addition, these purchases are often not a matter of major price differences. Many of theproducts that are bought with such low grades actually have better graded alternativesat a similar price point. We really think the utter lack of information, especially informationprovided with such proximity to the act of shopping, is the primary reason consumershaven’t been affected.Q: HOW might this application affect 1) e-tailers thatdon’t offer customers access to ethically sourced brands 2)manufacturers that might not be concerned with debt-bondageor wage theft in supply chains?A: We hope that the effect is a simple one: it hurts their profits. With the powerof our alternative recommendations in hand, which is one of the features of AboliShop,consumers will be able to move easily toward rewarding companies that do offer ethicallysourced products and away from those that are apathetic to this fight. We want to putmonetary pressure on any and every corporation that is actively ignoring the plight ofmodern day slavery. We want it to be ethically laudable, but also distinctly profitable, tocare about your supply chain.
  33. 33. ‘FUS RO DAH’32‘FUS RO DAH’Sarita, a survivor of international human trafficking.I am woman torn from home, from all that was known.I was a child in innocence, lost at their hands.I was mother, sister, daughter, cousin, friend .... all gone.But through it all I never gave up.The pain, the fear, the unknowing.The starvation, separation and threats.The rapes, the bleeding, hope lost.They took my children away from me.But I am the Unrelenting Force.This, they did not know as they targeted me.It is impossible to silence, to hide, to still.Each day the voice grows stronger ready to shout.And through it all I never forgot me.I prayed every night for this ordeal to end.But every morning I awoke to more cruelty.My children fed lies more often than food.Keeping lies out through family bonds.The Force grows stronger from the pain inflictedThe Balance in my mind fights to remain sane.The Push to find a way out steadily takes shape.In spite of it all I found strength anew.A moment of clarity now and then.A plan of escape, I’m smarter than them.I watch and listen and take the chance.Twenty minutes can feel like forever.
  34. 34. 33Time ticking no clock seen, routines copied and secrets seen.The hope leads to this, the moment, the one chance I get.A phone, no signal is all lost again? Wait, static, static is all I canhear.A message left in desperation, then wait and hope, time runningout.My Voice is raw power, pushing aside anything - or anyone - whostands in my path.The desire for freedom, the need to escape, the prayers for this tobe taken away.Building, building, growing stronger, growing braver, welling upinside until.The escape plan formed, the rescue made, the silence shattered.The voice speaks out, the voice is known.As the voice grows stronger the fear of the captors is seen.Chasing through states, burning bridges with haste.The police, the questions, the asking for proof.The shelters, the running, the hiding, the fear.Following every movement made, traffickers pursue.They think they are smart but they are not smart enough.But I am the unrelenting force.The journey is not complete when the rescue takes place.Held captive with no rope, no chains, no end in sight.Threats against children, starvation and sleep deprivation.Feed their ego, lack of morals, their thoughts not of human.To speak out now gives the woman new hope.To speak out now gives the children a voice.To speak out now helps others understand.Thiscanhappento you.
  35. 35. Join the conversation as it unfolds on the Roadkill Forum:http://usa.britishcouncil.org/art/roadkill. Follow us onTwitter (@usaBritish and #Roadkill13) and Tumblr (#Roadkill13)Susan Feldman and Andy Hamingson of St. Ann’s Warehouse, Criss Henderson andKendall Karg of Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Cora Bissett, Richard Jordan, TimMorozzo, Rachel Durchslag of Chicago Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation (CAASE),Leif Coorlim of CNN Freedom Project, Veronica Zeitlin and Emilie Yam of USAID, NormaRamos of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women, Sara Elizabeth Dill, Ruth Lewa ofSolidarity with Women In Distress (SOLWODI) Kenya, Kate Mogulescu of Legal Aid Society,Vivian Huelgo and Laurel Bellows of the American Bar Association, Jimmy Lee of RestoreNYC, Robert Rigby-Hall and Dawn Conway of the Global Business Coalition AgainstTrafficking, Siddharth Kara, Debra Brown Steinberg of VS: Confronting Modern Slavery inAmerica, Baroness Mary Goudie, Lyn Gardner, Bidisha, Jessica Minhas of the Blind Project,Chipo Nyambuya and Alison Cline of the British Consulate in Chicago, George Kogolla ofBritish Council in Kenya, Anne Milgram, Heather Gregorio, and Nancy Hoppock at NYULaw, Matthew Windrum of the British Consulate in New York, Craig Longhurst and GregRuggeri of Ruggeri Salon, Harley DeOliveira, Daniela Federici, Aaron Cohen, Alyse Nelsonof Vital Voices, Mai Shiozaki of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons,Jody Raphael from the College of Law at Depaul University, Kaitlyn Soligan of Madre, AmyO’Neil Richard at the U.S. Department of State, Wes Williams, Jennifer Chan at the U.S.Fund for UNICEF, Tracy Francis of New York Foundation for the Arts, Ken Karlic of SpliceDesign Group, and Brooklyn Borough Hall.SPEC IAL THANKS

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