• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Out Of Africa2
 

Out Of Africa2

on

  • 385 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
385
Views on SlideShare
385
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Out Of Africa2 Out Of Africa2 Presentation Transcript

    • Out of Africavs.multiregional
      Brita, Drew
      Out of Africa
      VS.
      Multiregional
      Brita and Drew
    • How did Homo sapiens come to be? That is a major unanswered question that boggles the mind of even the top scientists. Among many theories, two are the most well known, the Out of Africa theory and the multiregional.
    • First up is Out of Africa
      Homo erectus migrated out of Africa and spread across the world.
      With isolation these separate groups evolved on their own and in some cases separate species such as the Neanderthals in Europe and Western Asia.
      Homo sapiens (modern humans) evolved in Africa, including the Middle East.
      The now Homo sapiens migrated out of Africa and replaced all the other newly evolved human populations, without interbreeding.
      In this theory it says that only the genes out of Africa created modern humans.
    • Why in the world would they think that?
      Neanderthals are classified as a separate species with a completely different anatomy than Homo sapiens, suggesting that Neanderthals and Homo sapiens were isolated from one another and evolved separately into two different species
      The highest genetic difference between the people is in Africa, implying that Homo sapiens first arose there, giving them more time to develop genetic diversity
      Scientists were able to collect DNA from some Neanderthals showing the high distinction from our own, also showing that we had been separated for more than 400,000 years.
      Skeletons of Neanderthals were discovered in caves along side other caves with modern human skeletons showing that both Neanderthals and modern humans were alive at once and that Neanderthals didn’t evolve into modern humans.
    • Now for Multiregional
      Earliest hominid ancestors radiated out from Africa and settled all over the world
      Homo sapiens evolved from many different groups of Homo erectus in many parts of the world
      There were no modern humans in Europe until 50,000 years ago, but Neanderthals were discovered.
      Far East before 50,000 years ago the Homo erectus species developed into modern humans with different races (Chinese, Indians, etc.)
      The multiregional theory states that modern humans have mixed genes throughout the world
    • Oh yeah? Prove it.
      After the Homo erectus group spread across the world, evolution from natural selection begun with genetic evolution, giving us different looks for different places.
      In China there was a discovery of a couple skulls that had both Homo erectus and Homo sapiens traits. – Roughly 100,000 years old.
      Some evidence in the far East, Europe, and Africa shows that there are similarities between these ancient civilizations.
    • Out of Africa
    • Multiregional
    • Our opinion
      Personally, we support the out of Africa theory. Of course it is not as simple as it sounds. We believe that Homo sapiens developed in Africa and became the strongest of the newly developed populations. Through natural selection the other populations around the world died out, leaving the Homo sapiens. They were able to withstand and grew stronger from the environmental stress and many other evolutionary stresses. The evidence that supports the out of Africa theory is much stronger and more realistic than the Multiregional theory.