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Social Media And Democracy In Mexico
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Social Media And Democracy In Mexico

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This presentation describes the influence that the internet and social media tools had in the opening of political spaces in Mexico and the formation of a competitive democracy.

This presentation describes the influence that the internet and social media tools had in the opening of political spaces in Mexico and the formation of a competitive democracy.

Published in: News & Politics, Technology
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  • 1. How Internet Social Media was Critical to Bringing Democracy to Mexico
    Jose A. Briones, Ph.D.
    Twitter: @Brioneja
  • 2. Introduction
    Social Media for Social Change
    Twitter - Iran’s election
    Mexico: 1994 - 1997
  • 3. The MexNews Team 1994-97
    30 Volunteers
    Social Media for Change in Mexican Society
  • 4. Mexico in 1994
    One Party Rule for 65 years
    Media Censorship
  • 5. Mexico in 1994
    NAFTA
    EZLN Uprising - Chiapas
  • 6. The Arrival of the NGO’s
    UseofNew Media to Bypass Information Walls
    Traditional uprising becomes information-age “netwar”
  • 7. The Information War
    Raw information is widely available
    Control of the “infosphere” is broken
  • 8. Keeping the Spotlight
    Mexican Government loses control of information flows
    Maintain attention of foreign media and investors
  • 9. Information Flow: 1st Step
  • 10. Information Flow: 2nd Step
  • 11. 1994 Turmoil
    High-profile political murders
    Mexican Peso Devaluation – Recession
    “Snowball” effect
  • 12. 1995: Traditional Media Moves In
    “Mexican Rebels Using a High-Tech Weapon: Internet Helps Rally Support”
  • 13. 1995: Recognition
    Mexico’s Foreign Minister:
    “Chiapas is a war on the Internet”
  • 14. The Space is Opened
    Mexico’s press blackouts are lifted
    Opposition parties gain stronger foothold
  • 15. 1995: Rise of the Web
    Shift from 1st Gen Social Media to the web
    1st Mexican Newspapers on web
  • 16. 1996: Progress
    Emphasis Moves Toward Mexican Democracy
    Mexico’s Electoral Reform
  • 17. 1997: Breakthrough
    Opposition parties win control of Mexican Congress
  • 18. Mission Accomplished
    In 1997 after the opposition win, MexNewsdeasesoperations
  • 19. Retrospective
    Internet was instrumental in keeping the spotlight.
    Mexican government restraint opened the space for the press and political parties
  • 20. Vision
    Social Media: Individuals Empowered to Generate Social Change
  • 21. Contact Information
    Jose A. Briones, Ph.D.
    Brioneja@SpyroTek.com
    Twitter: @Brioneja

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