0
BiomimicryEmulating Nature’s GeniusBrightworksNicole Isle | Aron Bosworth
BiomimicryAn Introduction
Current EventsWorld’s Most Influential Designers
How does nature reduce drag?                                                       Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Insti...
How Does Nature Use Pattern?                                                     Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Institu...
How Does Nature Cool?                                                 Images courtesy of the Biomimicry InstituteThe Eastg...
How Does Nature Manage Water?                                                       Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Inst...
Biomimicry                                                        Innovation                              Makes ‘beyond su...
Biomimicry“the conscious emulation of life’s genius”                                   g                                  ...
3.85 billion years agoLife Appears                                                                                        ...
Evolution provides      3.85 billion years of trial and error, research and       3 85 billion years of trial and error re...
MENTOR     MODEL MEASURE
Nature as MENTOR                                                 quiet                                                 you...
Nature as MODEL
Mimicking Form                                              Hexagonal structure uses the                                  ...
Mimicking Process                                                           Application Ideas:                            ...
Mimicking (Eco)SystemForest ecosystems are subject to disturbances that create gaps in the forest stand. Change creates ne...
Earth’s Operating Conditions  – Earth is in a constant state of dynamic    non-equilibrium  – Earth is water based  – Subj...
Credit:ADAM NIEMAN / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
“Each  species is a       i imasterpiece…”      E.O. Wilson                    Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute
Life’s Principles       Life   Life  creates     adapts                   pconditions    andconducive     evolves    to li...
Life’s Principles                                             using multi-functional design       Life  creates        opt...
Life’s Principles                                  using multi-functional design       Life  creates     optimizing rather...
Life’s Principles                                           feedback loops       Life                Locally attuned      ...
Life’s Principles                            resourceful and opportunistic          Locally attuned          and responsiv...
Biomimicry &the BuiltEnvironmentUnderstanding EcosystemFunctions
Understanding Ecosystem Functions               “When the forest and the city are    then we know we have reached sustaina...
The Sustainable Sites Initiative,The Case of Sustainable Landscapes 2009      Fig. 2-1. The Bounty of Ecosystems
The Sustainable Sites Initiative,Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks Draft 2008            Fig. 2-4. Restoring Ecosystem...
Two Design ApproachesDesign to Biology        Biology to Design
Two Design Approaches                     Design to Biology                                        Biology to Design      ...
Biomimetic Design Process                                                               Biology to Design                 ...
Image courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
Existing Site ConditionsImage courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
Existing Site Conditions
Existing Site Conditions
Biomimetic Design Process                                                               Biology to Design                 ...
Floodplain Functions     Water cleansing     W t l       i     Water supply &      regulation     Erosion & sediment contr...
Historic Conditions
Biomimetic Design Process                                                               Biology to Design                 ...
Functional ExamplesCheonggyecheon StreamSeoul, South Korea
Functional Examples
Biomimetic Design Process                                                              Biology to Design                  ...
Conceptual Site Design    Image courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
Conceptual Site DesignImage courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
Conceptual Site DesignImage courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.I         t     f    M ti P t         I
Biomimetic Design Process                                                               Biology to Design                 ...
Biomimicry       o    cy     Resources                                Tree of Life Web ProjectImages courtesy of the Biomi...
Continue the conversationinfo(at)brightworks.netblog.brightworks.netwww.brightworks.net
Brightworks Sustainability Advisors helps ourclients create lasting value by aligning their effortswith basic principles o...
Biomimicry: Emulating Nature's Genius
Biomimicry: Emulating Nature's Genius
Biomimicry: Emulating Nature's Genius
Biomimicry: Emulating Nature's Genius
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Biomimicry: Emulating Nature's Genius

4,846

Published on

Biomimicry offers a holistic and deeply rooted method for achieving true sustainability. Nature embodies more than four billion years of experience perfecting the designs and behaviors that make organisms and living systems thrive. This unique presentation was created by a biologist and architectural designer, both professionally trained in Biomimicry and sustainable building design.

Published in: Design, Technology
0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,846
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
474
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Biomimicry: Emulating Nature's Genius"

  1. 1. BiomimicryEmulating Nature’s GeniusBrightworksNicole Isle | Aron Bosworth
  2. 2. BiomimicryAn Introduction
  3. 3. Current EventsWorld’s Most Influential Designers
  4. 4. How does nature reduce drag? Images courtesy of the Biomimicry InstituteWhalePower wind turbine blade design gains productivity by reducing drag drag. • 32% less drag • 20% production increase
  5. 5. How Does Nature Use Pattern?  Images courtesy of the Biomimicry InstituteThe InterfaceFLOR Entropy carpet tiles capitalize on the consistency ofinconsistency. y • Reduces waste • Embraces diversity – broadens materials palette, competitor’s waste = product feedstock! p
  6. 6. How Does Nature Cool? Images courtesy of the Biomimicry InstituteThe Eastgate Centre in Harare Zimbabwe uses a natural cooling systemthat pre tempers the air and exhausts through chimneys the same way pre-temperstermites do. • 90% energy reduction for cooling loads
  7. 7. How Does Nature Manage Water? Images courtesy of the Biomimicry InstituteLavasa Hill Station near Pune, India in the Western Ghats uses a sitedesign that i i how th surrounding fd i th t mimics h the di forest manages water and t t dcontrols erosion. • Inspiration: Tree canopies, root systems and water storage
  8. 8. Biomimicry Innovation Makes ‘beyond sustainability’ accessible M k ‘b d t i bilit ’ ibl Broadens the solution spaceSustainability Ecological literacy Environmentalist ideal – ecological imperative
  9. 9. Biomimicry“the conscious emulation of life’s genius” g Bio = life, living things Bio = life living things Mimic = simulate, emulate Forethought, intention Not a slavish re-creation, understand context Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute I t f th Bi i i I tit t Janine Benyus, Co-founder Biomimicry Guild
  10. 10. 3.85 billion years agoLife Appears fe 3.5 billion years ago Photosynthesis Evolves Hist ry of Lif H tor 1.5 billion years ago Multi‐celled Organisms  Appear Fish Appear Fish Appear 508 million years ago 430 million years ago Land Plants Appear 350 million years ago Amphibians Appear Homo Sapiens Sapiens  Appears 246 million years ago Mammals Appear Present Day 212 million years ago Birds Appear 65 million years ago Hominids Walk on Two Limbs Dinosaur Extinction 4 million years ago 50, 000 years ago
  11. 11. Evolution provides 3.85 billion years of trial and error, research and  3 85 billion years of trial and error research and development,  and rigorous quality control testing that resulted in a  and rigorous quality control testing that resulted in a 99.9% failure rate,  so that the estimated  30 million different species of organisms living on earth  today are success stories. They have figured out materials, forms, processes, systems, and strategies needed to sustain themselves in the conditions on earth as it  t t i d dt t i th l i th diti th it is today –the very same conditions in which we must sustain the very same conditions in which we must sustain ourselves.
  12. 12. MENTOR     MODEL MEASURE
  13. 13. Nature as MENTOR quiet your clevernessImages courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute
  14. 14. Nature as MODEL
  15. 15. Mimicking Form Hexagonal structure uses the  least material to create a  lattice of cells with minimal  surface area and the largest  surface area and the largest possible volume. Application Ideas:  A li ti Id • building structural stability • minimizing materialImages courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute
  16. 16. Mimicking Process Application Ideas: A li i Id • organizational / change management • transportation systems It is believed that social insects have been so successful – they are almost everywhere  It is believed that social insects have been so successful they are almost everywhere in the ecosphere – because of three characteristics: • flexibility (the colony can adapt to a changing environment • robustness (when one or more individuals fail the group can still perform its task robustness (when one or more individuals fail, the group can still perform its task • self‐organization (activities are neither centrally controlled nor locally supervised)Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute
  17. 17. Mimicking (Eco)SystemForest ecosystems are subject to disturbances that create gaps in the forest stand. Change creates new opportunity for growth to maintain and enhance many ecosystem maintain and enhance many ecosystemvalues. Ecological features of forest stands:• Size and shape• Abundance• Composition• Spatial / temporal distributionApplication Idea: City Planning
  18. 18. Earth’s Operating Conditions – Earth is in a constant state of dynamic non-equilibrium – Earth is water based – Subject to limits and bounds
  19. 19. Credit:ADAM NIEMAN / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
  20. 20. “Each species is a i imasterpiece…” E.O. Wilson Images courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute
  21. 21. Life’s Principles Life Life creates adapts pconditions andconducive evolves to lif t life
  22. 22. Life’s Principles using multi-functional design Life creates optimizing rather fitting form to function than th maximizing i i iconditionsconducive recycling all materials to life leveraging interdependence self organizing using benign using life-friendly materials Life manufacturing adapts p using water based chemistry and fostering cooperative relationships evolves using self assembly
  23. 23. Life’s Principles using multi-functional design Life creates optimizing rather fitting form to function than th maximizing i i iconditions recycling all materialsconducive to life
  24. 24. Life’s Principles feedback loops Life Locally attuned resourceful and opportunistic creates and responsive free energyconditionsconducive shape rather than material to life cellular and nested Resilient antenna, signal, response simple, common building blocks Life Integrates cyclic learns and imitates adapts p processes cross pollination and mutation and diverse evolves decentralized and distributed redundant
  25. 25. Life’s Principles resourceful and opportunistic Locally attuned and responsive free energy shape rather than material simple, common building blocksLifeadapts pandevolves
  26. 26. Biomimicry &the BuiltEnvironmentUnderstanding EcosystemFunctions
  27. 27. Understanding Ecosystem Functions “When the forest and the city are then we know we have reached sustainability.” ~Janine Benyus Provisioning: food, fuel, fresh water, genetic resources, fiber, etc. Regulating: climate regulation, flood regulation, disease regulation, etc. Supporting: nutrient cycling, soil formation, photosynthesis, etc. Cultural: biophilia, educational, spiritual, recreational, etc.
  28. 28. The Sustainable Sites Initiative,The Case of Sustainable Landscapes 2009 Fig. 2-1. The Bounty of Ecosystems
  29. 29. The Sustainable Sites Initiative,Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks Draft 2008 Fig. 2-4. Restoring Ecosystem Services
  30. 30. Two Design ApproachesDesign to Biology Biology to Design
  31. 31. Two Design Approaches Design to Biology Biology to Design Evaluate Evaluate Discover against Life’s  Identify the  against Life’s  natural  Principles real challenge Principles models Emulate Translate to to  Emulate Abstract  Abstract natural  the design  natural  design  strategies brief strategies principles Discover  Discover Identify natural  application  models opportunitiesMethodology Created by the Biomimicry Institute
  32. 32. Biomimetic Design Process Biology to Design Evaluate DISCOVER against Life’s  Principles natural models Emulate Abstract  natural  design  strategies principles Identify application  opportunitiesMethodology Created by the Biomimicry Institute
  33. 33. Image courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
  34. 34. Existing Site ConditionsImage courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
  35. 35. Existing Site Conditions
  36. 36. Existing Site Conditions
  37. 37. Biomimetic Design Process Biology to Design Evaluate Discover against Life’s  natural  Principles models Emulate ABSTRACT natural  strategies design principles Identify application  opportunitiesMethodology Created by the Biomimicry Institute
  38. 38. Floodplain Functions Water cleansing W t l i Water supply &  regulation Erosion & sediment control Habitat functions Waste decomposition  & treatment Human health &  well‐being Cultural benefits
  39. 39. Historic Conditions
  40. 40. Biomimetic Design Process Biology to Design Evaluate Discover against Life’s  natural  Principles models Emulate Abstract  natural  design  strategies principles IDENTIFY application opportunitiesMethodology Created by the Biomimicry Institute
  41. 41. Functional ExamplesCheonggyecheon StreamSeoul, South Korea
  42. 42. Functional Examples
  43. 43. Biomimetic Design Process Biology to Design Evaluate Discover against Life’s  natural  Principles models EMULATE Abstract  Abstract design  natural strategies principles Identify application  opportunitiesMethodology Created by the Biomimicry Institute
  44. 44. Conceptual Site Design Image courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
  45. 45. Conceptual Site DesignImage courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.
  46. 46. Conceptual Site DesignImage courtesy of AC Martin Partners, Inc.I t f M ti P t I
  47. 47. Biomimetic Design Process Biology to Design EVALUATE Discover against Life’s  natural  Principles models Emulate l Abstract  b natural  design  strategies principles Identify Id tif application  opportunitiesMethodology Created by the Biomimicry Institute
  48. 48. Biomimicry o cy Resources Tree of Life Web ProjectImages courtesy of the Biomimicry Institute
  49. 49. Continue the conversationinfo(at)brightworks.netblog.brightworks.netwww.brightworks.net
  50. 50. Brightworks Sustainability Advisors helps ourclients create lasting value by aligning their effortswith basic principles of ecological social and ecological,economic sustainability. Recognized as a leadingprovider of end-to-end sustainability services inthe built environment and for organizationalstrategy, we have completed more than 90 LEEDcertified buildings across the country country.
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×