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MA Happy Museum Bridget McKenzie

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  • Reason for being here: reference to myinvolvement in Happy Museum and development of the Museums for the Future toolkit to support its approach
  • I call this human activity ecocide
  • Climate change is the planetary boundary most significant because it impacts on and worsens all the other breaches of planetary boundaries.
  • There is no way that a
  • The Happy Museum project takes a gentle approach, focusing on opportunities, exploring alternative routes to happiness. However, I think it’s important to make a distinction between positivity and pussyfooting. Study of children in several schools (by environmental charities in UK) showed that where children had lots of input about wider world, combined with tips on what action they could take, they were much happier. Photois by Chris Jordan, albatross chicks are fed plastic by their loving parents, in the Atlantic Gyre.
  • There is increasing recognition that deep-rooted cultural values are where we need to focus transformative efforts. A group of environmental NGOs has formed a movement called Common Cause which seeks to transform values from self-enhancing (materialistic/hedonistic) towards ‘bigger than self’ – to become more communally-minded.
  • Not just your immediate locality and people who support the museum for its own sake, but these four outer dimensions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Setting the scene Why be a Happy Museum?
      BridgetMcKenzie, Flow Associates
    • 2. 2
      BUT, land use changes:
      • Deforestation
      • 3. Intense farming
      • 4. Extraction & fossil fuels
      • 5. In short, ecocide
      Root issue: Belief that wealth = wellbeing
      LEADS TO growth of:
      • human population
      • 6. Consumption & waste
      • 7. unequal wealth
      • 8. NOT happiness
    • 3
      Leading to resource scarcity:
      Spiralling of growth for wealth...
    • 4
      GREENHOUSE EFFECT
      LEADS TO
      • Sea level rise
      • 15. Climate disruption
      DISASTERS
      MORE GLOBAL WARMING
      Feedback effects. Plus,more damage to ecosystems =
      Yet more feedback effects.
      GLOBAL WARMING!
      IMPACTS ON HUMANS
      IMPACTS ON BIODIVERSITY
      • Migrations
      • 25. Habitat collapse
      • 26. Risk of extinction to most vertebrates (includes humans)
      INCREASES RESOURCE SCARCITY
      Wealth-not-wellbeing is root of global warming
    • 27. Quick note on planetary boundaries
      Ozone layer (worse than thought)
      Biodiversity (safe boundary breached)
      Chemical dispersion (can’t quantify)
      Climate change (breached & impacts on others)
      Ocean acidification (40% acid)
      Freshwater consumption (bad but solvable)
      Land use change (on way to breached)
      Nitrogen/phosphorous (pretty bad)
      Atmospheric aerosol (can’t quantify)
    • 28. So, in the false belief that destroying nature ensures human wellbeing by providing jobs, goods, and jobs to make more goods, we destroy the conditions for our own wellbeing and for all other forms of life*
    • 29. *Except maybe ants...
      Technical name: ‘Hairy crazy ant’
    • 30. This crisis means that no museum can sustain itself, financially or ethically, without the thriving and wellbeing of global biodiversity (including humanity) somewhere in its mission*.
      *Ideally, somewhere BIG in its mission
    • 31. Wellbeing: The Eudaimoniamovement
      Human flourishing
      Prosperity without growth
      Autonomy to act
      Happiness not hedonism
      Inspiring #occupywallstreet
    • 32. Museums for the Future toolkit
      • How the Museums for the Future toolkit can help you support this movement
      • 33. You can find this toolkit on the Happy Museum website and on Renaissance South East pages
      • 34. I’ll finish with three approaches of many from the toolkit
    • Use Museums for the Future toolkit
      • Aim: For museums to be centres of sustainable communities
      • 35. By Renaissance South East & Flow
      • 36. The legacy of 8 pilot projects: museums in Kent, Surrey, Hants, E Sussex
      • 37. Includes presentation, directories, evaluation & planning tools
    • Toolkit: 8 thematic pathways to suit your museum
      Materials and things
      Wellbeing
      Biodiversity stewardship
      Green your museum with people
      Place-making and adaptation
      Energy and new technology
      Transition to sustainable economy
      Food, farming and horticulture
    • 38. 1. Show & tell the truth but give people space to feel sad and the tools to act
    • 39. 2. Engage cultural values or ‘deep frames’
      The ‘Common Cause’ values model
    • 40. People struggle to leap the gap from changing values to changing their actions
      Museums for the Future
      15
      The Value-Action Gap
      External influences: Crises, Teachers, Examples
      CHANGED ACTIONS
      CHANGED VALUES
      CHANGED INTENTIONS
      Internal influences: Fears/hopes, personality
    • 41. To help breach the value-action gap we need to learn why it’s there
      16
      External influences tell me ‘conform to social norms of happiness’ & ‘doubt the evidence of science’
      The Value-Action Gap
      ‘I can see logic of change but my values are long-held’
      ‘I need nudges, systems, peers to change my mind’
      ‘I can’t imagine what this future looks like’
      Internal influences: ‘I’m afraid to change. I may be unhappy’
    • 42. 3. Change how you relate to communities
      • Mutual relationships towards wellbeing
      • 43. Work with others to protect heritage beyond the museum
      • 44. Expose & open your assets to help others tackle big challenges
    • Define community
      openly while
      building museum as ‘home’ or local hub
      18
    • 45. To conclude: My question
      If a ‘wellbeing not wealth’ mission means your museum must challenge the status quo, what might be the risks to your museum? How could you overcome the risks?
    • 46. Toolkit available on Happy Museum website More about me on:www.flowassociates.comhttp://thelearningplanet.wordpress.com bridget.mckenzie@flowassociates.com