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Nielsen: UK Incremental Reach: TV + Online Fusing BARB and UKOM data to improve cross-media planning
 

Nielsen: UK Incremental Reach: TV + Online Fusing BARB and UKOM data to improve cross-media planning

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Incremental Reach: TV + Online ...

Incremental Reach: TV + Online
Fusing BARB and UKOM data to improve cross-media planning
Overview
This article looks at the actual UK advertising spend of a well-known fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) food brand to illustrate how well Television and Internet advertising can work together when it comes to extending the number of consumers that an advertising campaign reaches.
Methodology
Nielsen selected an actual ad campaign where the advertiser allocated the entire budget solely to TV. Using a “fusion on the fly” approach that joins BARB TV currency data with UKOM online currency data, we then analysed what would happen if that advertiser decided to extend the TV campaign versus the outcome if that extra spend was allocated to the Internet instead.
This fusion approach determines how many people would be exposed to each media, how many would be exposed to both media and how many to neither. Thus, the outcome of the extra spend can be measured in terms of the additional number of consumers reached (also known as “incremental” reach or “lift”) and the change in the average number of times consumers were exposed to the ad (a.k.a. “frequency”).

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    Nielsen: UK Incremental Reach: TV + Online Fusing BARB and UKOM data to improve cross-media planning Nielsen: UK Incremental Reach: TV + Online Fusing BARB and UKOM data to improve cross-media planning Document Transcript

    • Incremental Reach: TV + OnlineFusing BARB and UKOM data to improve cross-media planningOverviewThis article looks at the actual UK advertising spend of a well-known fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) foodbrand to illustrate how well Television and Internet advertising can work together when it comes to extending thenumber of consumers that an advertising campaign reaches.MethodologyNielsen selected an actual ad campaign where the advertiser allocated the entire budget solely to TV. Using a “fusionon the fly” approach that joins BARB TV currency data with UKOM online currency data, we then analysed whatwould happen if that advertiser decided to extend the TV campaign versus the outcome if that extra spend wasallocated to the Internet instead.This fusion approach determines how many people would be exposed to each media, how many would be exposed toboth media and how many to neither. Thus, the outcome of the extra spend can be measured in terms of theadditional number of consumers reached (also known as “incremental” reach or “lift”) and the change in the averagenumber of times consumers were exposed to the ad (a.k.a. “frequency”).The analysis uses actual ad spend data, a real television campaign and actual consumer behaviour online and on TV -not self-reported behaviour.The Original CampaignThe advertiser spent just over £600,000 on the TV campaign in November 2010, spread across a combination ofterrestrial and satellite/cable/digital channels.The campaign reached 56.39% of the UK population aged over 15 – each of whom was exposed to the ad an averageof 2.41 times (the frequency). This meant the campaign achieved a total of 136 Gross Rating Points (GRPs) amongstthe 15+ population.GRPs are used in advertising to measure the size of an audience reached by a specific media vehicle or schedule. It iscalculated by multiplying the percentage of the audience the ad reaches by the number of times they see it in a givencampaign. In this case, 56.39 x 2.41 = 136. 1Copyright © 2011 The Nielsen Company. All rights reserved. Nielsen and the Nielsenlogo are trademarks or registered trademarks of The Nielsen Company. Produced in the UK.
    • Ad campaign metrics amongst UK 15+ population Original TV Original TV Original TV UK 15+ Population Original TV schedule + 6 million Online + 4 million Online + 10 percent TV Impressions Impressions Reach (000s) 28,056 28,632 30,008 29,528 Reach (%) 56.39% 57.54% 60.31% 59.34% Average exposures 2.41 2.60 2.49 2.45 per person GRPs 135.72 149.69 149.93 145.17Source: Nielsen IMS & UKOM, November 2010, BARB, 2010Read as: 56.39% of UK people aged 15+ (28.1 million people) were exposed to the original TV-only campaign on average 2.41 times; totalling 136GRPsIncremental Reach OutcomesTV + TVSo what would happen if the advertiser decided to spend an extra 10 percent on the TV campaign?The extended campaign would then reach 57.54% of the UK 15+ population. This is an incremental increase in reachfrom the original TV campaign of 2.04% or 576,000 people.The average number of times each person was exposed to the ad (frequency) also jumps from 2.41 times to 2.60times.This meant the extended TV campaign achieved a total of 150 GRPs – an extra 14 GRPs.TV + Online Display (@ £10 CPM)So what would happen if the advertiser decided to allocate the extra 10 percent spend to an online display campaigninstead of TV?To understand this, we assumed a cost of £10 to have the ad appear on a thousand page views. In online advertisingparlance this is referred to as a CPT or CPM – cost per thousand/mille - of £10.At a CPM of £10, a £60,000 budget equates to an online campaign of 6 million page impressions - assuming the adonly appears once on each web page.The six million page impressions were spread across a number of major portals and entertainment sites.UKOM/Nielsen data for November 2010 shows that this online campaign would, therefore, reach 9.28% of all UKpeople aged 15+ (4.62 million people).Combining the original TV campaign (c £600,000 spend) with the online campaign (£60,000 spend) results in theoverall campaign reaching 60.31% of the UK 15+ population or 30.01 million people. 2Copyright © 2011 The Nielsen Company. All rights reserved. Nielsen and the Nielsenlogo are trademarks or registered trademarks of The Nielsen Company. Produced in the UK.
    • Reach of ad campaigns amongst UK 15+ population 62% 60.31% 60% 59.34% 58% 57.54% 56.39% 56% 54% 52% 50% Original TV schedule Original TV + 10 percent TV Original TV + 6 million Original TV + 4 million Online Impressions Online ImpressionsSource: Nielsen IMS & UKOM, November 2010, BARB, 2010Read as: 56.39% of UK people aged 15+ were exposed to the original TV-only campaignTherefore, the online campaign results in an incremental reach of 1.95 million UK people (a 6.95% increase in reach)on the original TV campaign or 1.38 million more on the extended TV campaign.That the online campaign was able to reach 1.95 million people who didn’t see the original TV campaign equates to42% of people who saw the online campaign not seeing the TV campaign. In terms of duplication, 2.67 millionpeople saw both the online and TV campaign.Extra number of people reached (000s) if original TV spend increased by 10 percent 1,952 1,472 576 TV + TV TV + 6 million Online impressions TV + 4 million Online impressionsSource: Nielsen IMS & UKOM, November 2010, BARB, 2010Read as: allocating the extra 10% ad spend (circa £60,000) to TV increases the reach of the original TV-only campaign to 576,000 more UK peopleaged 15+The “TV+Online” campaign increases the average number of exposures from 2.41 “TV-only” to 2.49. As this is lowerthan the “TV+TV” campaign average (2.60) but also achieves 150 GRPs, it suggests new people being exposed to thecombined campaign at lower, arguably more efficient, frequencies. 3Copyright © 2011 The Nielsen Company. All rights reserved. Nielsen and the Nielsenlogo are trademarks or registered trademarks of The Nielsen Company. Produced in the UK.
    • TV + Online Display (@ £15 CPM)Assuming a higher cost for the Internet campaign - £15 CPM rather than £10 – gives a potential campaign of fourmillion page impressions. This time one million impressions were allocated across four major portals andentertainment sites.This online campaign would reach 7.00% of all UK people aged 15+ (3.48 million people).Even at this higher cost CPM, the overall reach of the campaign still increased by more than the “TV+TV” campaign.Reach rose to 59.34% of UK people 15+ (29.53 million). This is an increase of 1.47 million on the original TVcampaign and 896,000 more than the increased TV campaign.In other words, the £15 CPM online campaign was able to reach 1.47 million people who didn’t see the original TVcampaign.The online campaigns were run across some of the most popular websites so it’s possible to extend the incrementalreach even further by choosing websites in the plan that tend to have higher concentrations of light TV users.It’s worth pointing out that both of the “TV+Online” campaigns still meet the overall communications levels of theoriginal TV campaign. For all three of these campaigns around 17-18% of people exposed saw the ad between fourand six times, and 95% of those exposed saw it no more than six times.Epilogue: EffectivenessThis research focused purely on the number of UK adults that the campaign reached and the average number oftimes they saw it. There are a number of ways Nielsen can provide a more granular and holistic view of how thecampaign performed.For example, being a campaign for a food brand, the performance can be analysed against different buying targets,such as housewives (demographic group), or particular food-type buyers (product groups). Again, selecting sites thatperform strongly on attracting these different groups can improve the efficacy of using the Internet to top up thecampaign’s reach against desired groups.Effectiveness can also be measured beyond just reach by looking at the impact on consumer attitudes and behaviour.Each of the TV and online components of the campaign can be analysed by how much consumers liked the ads, thedegree to which they recall the ad, the message delivered and who the advertiser was. Intent to purchase can also bequantified – particularly relevant for FMCG brands – as can the impact on the number of visitors to the product’swebsite, the number of online searches conducted as well as the change in volume and sentiment around discussionsof the product in online and social media.It’s not just intent to purchase, Nielsen measures the actual impact on unit sales, both overall and amongst differentconsumer groups to assess who the campaign had the greatest impact on. Even if the TV and Online campaign waspart of a wider promotion – for example, one that included in-store promotions – they can be stripped out to isolatethe impact of the media buy.Elements of these measures will be covered in an updated version of this paper.For more information or to receive the updated version contact:Simon NuddsThe Nielsen Companysimon.nudds@nielsen.com+44 207 420 9200 4Copyright © 2011 The Nielsen Company. All rights reserved. Nielsen and the Nielsenlogo are trademarks or registered trademarks of The Nielsen Company. Produced in the UK.
    • About the Numbers and How We Get ThemIncremental ReachThe reach of TV, Internet and combined campaigns is done through Nielsen IMS CampaignRF solution. This uses a“fusion on the fly” approach to join the BARB TV currency data with the UKOM online audience measurementcurrency data to establish the reach and frequency of exposure of each media against a specific target. It determineshow many respondents would be exposed to each media, how many would be exposed to both media and how manyto neither.Nielsen IMS provides complete audience profiling, with more than 1,200 syndicated and proprietary databases thatare loaded each year, along with analytic tools that support global media and marketing decisions. Research optionsinclude reach and frequency analysis, schedule performance and management, single - and multi-media cross -platform campaign analysis, data visualization, brand management and flow-charting systems.Online Audience MeasurementUKOM/Nielsen data is a measure of the actual behaviour of unique individuals accessing the Internet from personalcomputers within home and work locations. The figures come from a fully-representative opt-in panel recruited viatraditional offline as well as online methods.UKOM (The UK Online Measurement Company) is a cross-industry organisation set up to specify and oversee therobust measurement of online audiences, to the standards required for the purposes of brand campaign planning byadvertisers and agencies. It is run by the IAB and AOP representing media owners, with oversight by ISBA on behalf ofadvertisers and IPA on behalf of agencies. UKOM is powered by Nielsen data.Advertising MeasurementNielsen measures advertising expenditure and creative content daily across all major media types. Nielsen workswith many of the industry’s leading associations and bodies to ensure its media measurement methodology is alwaysaccurate and reflects the current market. We use a unique three-tier brand categorisation system in the UK, withdiscount-calculated costs to ensure different media can be realistically compared.Our industry-standard media measurement tools enable benchmarking analysis of competitor brand positioning,advertising share of voice, media mix strategies, ad sales performance, ad verification, and provide valuable leadgeneration services.About The Nielsen CompanyThe Nielsen Company (NYSE: NLSN) is a global information and measurement company with leading marketpositions in marketing and consumer information, television and other media measurement, online intelligence,mobile measurement, trade shows and related assets. The company has a presence in approximately 100 countries,with headquarters in New York, USA. For more information on The Nielsen Company, visit www.nielsen.com. 5Copyright © 2011 The Nielsen Company. All rights reserved. Nielsen and the Nielsenlogo are trademarks or registered trademarks of The Nielsen Company. Produced in the UK.