Babelfish: Articles May2012 April2013 15-5-13
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Babelfish: Articles May2012 April2013 15-5-13

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Articles that I have collected over the last year. Index divides the articles by topic. A lot of info, but worth a scan...at least the index. I hope it is as much use to you as it was to me. Cheers, ...

Articles that I have collected over the last year. Index divides the articles by topic. A lot of info, but worth a scan...at least the index. I hope it is as much use to you as it was to me. Cheers, BC

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Babelfish: Articles May2012 April2013 15-5-13 Babelfish: Articles May2012 April2013 15-5-13 Document Transcript

  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 1ArticlesMay 2012 - April 2013Brian CrottyBabelfish.Brazil@gmail.com
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 2SummaryAnalytics Not All DMPs are Created Equal: What Every Smart Marketer Should Know 20Analytics Excerpted from Analytics: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, andThink by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Kenneth Cukier.31Analytics Interesting Ways Businesses Use Analytics to Improve Personalization 35Analytics The Ads That Know Too Much 49Analytics Increase Analytics Opportunities and Minimize Obstacles 53Analytics CMO COUNCIL FINDS Analytics CRITICAL TO CUSTOMER-CENTRIC CULTURES 53Analytics Analytics analysis allows businesses and governments to mine your personal details 57Analytics How Analytics and Analytics Are Transforming In-Store Experience for Retailers 63Analytics Data Is The Way To Go -- Except When Its Not 81Analytics Madison Avenue’s Odd Couple: Data And Creative Making Beautiful Ads Together 84Analytics Analytics, Big Ads, Big Results: Pulling Data Science into A Premium Exchange 86Analytics The Opportunity Cost of Targeting to Death: Part I of IV - Steve Bookbinder- Digital MediaTraining89Analytics Facebook to Partner With Acxiom, Epsilon to Match Store Purchases With User Profiles 121Analytics Analytics Wont Fix Bad Planning 134Analytics Analytics Goes to Washington -- And Spends Lots of Money 150Analytics Veteran Firm Acxiom Eyes Data-Hungry Advertiser Market 154Analytics Use Analytics to Engage Consumers, Not Just Monitor Digital Costs 155Analytics Analytics Is Enabling Marketers to Do More With Less 170Analytics Data is not always a substitute for strategy 174Analytics Big Brands on Analytics: Bigger Marketing Is Not Better 215Analytics Facebook Inks Deal With Acxiom, Epsilon, and Others to Show Ads Based On ShoppingHabits- Acxiom, Epsilon, Datalogix, BlueKai Announced As Partners253Analytics Facebook to Partner With Acxiom, Epsilon to Match Store Purchases With User ProfilesCan Facebook Ads Drive Offline Buying?258Analytics Big-Data Storytelling: The Agencys Role In Moneyball Era Of Marketing 291Analytics Rentrak Teams With dunnhumby, Revs Up 12% 293Analytics Who Will Win In Emerging Big-Data World? 304Analytics Unlocking marketings dark data: The Year of Analytics 309Analytics How Data and Micro-Targeting Won the 2012 Election for Obama 319Analytics The Dawn of Convergence Analytics 373Analytics BlueKai: Not Just a Data Warehouse Anymore Ad tech firm expands its offerings 396Analytics Gas Pump Videos Integrate Real-Time Ad Targeting 398Analytics Publicis, IBM Expand eCommerce Partnership 402Analytics The Good, Bad, and Ugly of Online Campaign Ratings and eGRPs 405Analytics Mental Models For UX, Search And Conversion 411Analytics 40% of Brands Using DMPs But Emphasize Internal Data 418Analytics Focus on Outcomes, Not Organization 421Analytics The Massive Scale Of Amazons Distribution Operations, Revealed Through StartlingImages436Analytics ComScore Debuts Cross-Platform Reporting System 441Analytics How Prediction Learning Curves Can Improve Digital Ad Effectiveness 442Analytics Email Marketing Is No Stranger to Analytics 447Analytics AudienceScience Rejiggers Business Model, Closes Ad Network Biz 457Analytics Adometry and LiveRamp Meld to Offer Offline-Online Data 475Analytics 10 comments on "Multitasking Media Impacts TVs Dominance". 485Analytics Some Sites Reserve Right To Share Personal Data 490Analytics The Analytics Fallacy And Why We Need To Collect Even Bigger Data 498Analytics Report Finds Data On Online Ad Viewability Is, Ironically, Less Viewable 516
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 3Analytics Inside the Secret World of the Data Crunchers Who Helped Obama Win 527Analytics Data Reveals Influence Of Enthusiast Communities On Purchases 543Analytics Data Key To Yahoo Japan, BrightTag Deal 544Analytics Multi-Channel Marketing Drives Custom Analytics Deployments 546Analytics Facebook Stole Your Fans - and Wants a Ransom to Get Them Back 547Analytics The 2nd Rule of Ad Exchanges 548Analytics Analytics Creates Jobs 562Analytics Analytics Will Transform Financial Industry, Warns TomorrowToday 562Analytics WPPs Spafax Teams With Nielsen To Develop Digital OOH Index, Calls It A Vital Next StepToward Exchange Model566Analytics The Remarkable Rise Of Retargeting 576Analytics Nielsen Chief: GroupM Pushing XCR As Cross-Platform Ratings Standard, Asserts Its A FaitAccompli578Analytics "CREATE EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS TO DETECT COMPETITIVE THREATS" 582Analytics Analytics Technology Drives Online Marketing With Offline Data 582Analytics Analytics and the Marketing Organization 583Analytics Twitter Partners With Nielsen for Brand Campaign Surveys 590Analytics The Disintermediation Of Everything 591Analytics Modeling Behavior To Target Smarter 592Analytics The Four Data Waves And How They Help Us Meet Marketing Goals 597Analytics The Knowledge Revolution Is Not About Analytics, Its About Well-Connected Little Data 599Analytics MasterCard Deal Gives Brands Peek Into Consumers Offline Spending 605Analytics Google Launches Remarketing in Search in Beta 606Analytics RTB Is Growing Up 607Analytics A Decade With The Database Of Intentions 608Analytics Heres The Exact Reason Apple No Longer Has Google-Based Maps On The iPhone 610Analytics IDG TechNetworks Builds Marketing Platform From Analytics 613Analytics Nielsen Cuts 500,000 U.S. TV Homes on Census, Web Viewing 614Analytics Is the Future of Digital Ad Buys in Cost-per-Engagement? 618Analytics Retargeting For Retailers 625Analytics Analyticss Management Revolution 633Analytics Media Buying: TV Shows Now Assigned Brand Value 641Analytics 4 Steps to ‘Close the Loop’ 647Analytics Criteo and Rocket Fuel Join Expanding Facebook Exchange 649Analytics Ad Firm Touts Results On Facebook Exchange 650Analytics Web Analytics Maturity: 3 Signs on the Road to Success 657Analytics Content Marketing Personas 658Analytics Multivariate Testing: Do We Need A Chief Measurement Officer? 661Analytics New Facebook, Twitter Ad Targeting Options Offer Opportunities & Challenges 664Analytics Failure to Beat Nielsen Led Google to Pull Plug on TV Ads 666Analytics Wolfram Alpha: The Facebook app that knows you better than you do 668Analytics RTB Ad Market Soars In Q1, Marketers Rush To Mobile, Avoid Social Inventory 668Analytics How Do You Measure Returns on Investment in Ad Tech? 676Analytics We Cant Be Obsessed With Clicks and Ignore More Nuanced Data 676Analytics In Search Of Analytics Through Mobile Apps 683Analytics AMD Exec: Data Explosion In Surround Computing 685Analytics Recommended Brand Videos Drive 4 To 6 Times Brand Lift 685Analytics Why Too Much Data Disables Your Decision Making 690Analytics The Seduction of Data 691Analytics Marketers Struggle to Link Digital Data to ‘Analytics’ Picture 695Analytics Cookie Deletion and Upper-Funnel Targeting 696
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 4Analytics A Scientific Geniuss Definition of Insane Marketing 702Analytics Apple Is Talking To Cable Companies About A Deal That Could Change TV Forever 705Analytics Connect the Dots: Goals to Metrics to Compensation 708Analytics Whats the Big Deal With Analytics? 713Analytics Google+ Adds Custom URLs for Brands 714Analytics Marketers Obsession With Audience Data Could Teach Media a Thing or Two 714Analytics Facebook Moves Away From Dumb Broadcasting Tool to Marketing Database 715Analytics Page Post Targeting Will Require a Radical Re-Thinking of the Approach to Content 715Analytics Retargeting: 3 Ways to Avoid Frustrating Your Potential Customers 716Analytics How To Sensibly Measure The Impact Of Sports Marketing Activation 721Analytics Travel Research Trumps Bookings On Smartphones 722Analytics Web Ads Target Based On What You Watched On TV 727Analytics TiVo-Datalogix Partnership Lets Advertisers Target People Online Based on What TheyveWatched On Television727Analytics Cross-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining 727Analytics The Art of the Infographic 729Analytics Accurately Evaluate the Performance of Your Marketing Efforts 733Analytics The Social Integration Is On (and Intelligence Follows) 734Analytics Bigger Video Player, Better Ad Performance 735Analytics Much is made of what the likes of Facebook, Google and Apple know about users. Truthis, Amazon may know more. And the massive retailer proves it every day.739Analytics Facebook to Launch Real-Time Bidding for Marketplace Ads 743Analytics Using Data to Drive Interactive Experiences 749Analytics How to Measure Social Media - and Show Results to the C-Suite 758Analytics The Data Olympics 761Analytics When in doubt, when your marketing isnt working, the answer is easy: go one circle in. 764Analytics Stop Letting Sales Get All the Credit! 774Analytics Connect Analytics With Customer Behavior to Improve Social, Email, and Web ROI 775Analytics TV Everywhere - A Broader Definition 776Analytics Congress Concerned About Hidden Dossiers By Data Brokers 777Analytics Consumer Data, but Not for Consumers 777Analytics Ad Industry Needs Fewer Impressions 779Analytics Nielsen Moves From Measuring Effects To Affecting Them: Wants To Change The WayBrands Advertise790Analytics CEOs Want More ROI, How About Look In The Mirror 792Analytics 73% of CEOs Think Marketers Lack Business Credibility: They Cant Prove They GenerateBusiness Growth792Analytics 80% of CEOs Do Not Really Trust Marketers (Except If They Are "ROI Marketers") 793Analytics 3 Tactics for Demographic Targeting on the Google Display Network 798Analytics The Interest Graph Vs. The Knowledge Graph 802Analytics The Must-Have Analytics Tools 805Analytics Digital Targeting Needs Discussion, Not Debacle 806Analytics Online Video CPG Campaign Boosts TV Buy By 10% 807Analytics Shopping for roi: cpg advertisers finding big return with video 807Analytics Video Ads Score With Large Player Environments 813Analytics Demystifying Attribution: What’s The Best Approach? 815Analytics Who Ate My Cookies? “Do Not Track” Legislation Will Hit Mid-Market Hardest 816Analytics How to Combine Personas With Automation and Get Closer to Customers 820Analytics Users Emerge As Distinct Category of Shoppers 821Analytics Top 3 Reasons Why You Need Tag Management Right Now 824Analytics CPG Shopper Based Analytics Delivers Nearly Triple Ad Investment 826Analytics How to measure ROI of online video 826
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 5Analytics EXelate Launches Custom Audience Modeling Tool For Long-Term Brand Affinity 830Analytics Adiant’s Premium-Only Network Adblade Launches Retargeting Feature 831Analytics Publicidade em tempo real começa a chegar ao Brasil 833Analytics Facebook To Roll Out Real-Time Exchange 835Analytics Analytics Means Big Opportunity 838Analytics Optimizing Retargeting for Lift Instead of Shift 841Analytics Add a Little Chaos to Your Data 842Analytics 10 Reasons Your Media Plan Needs to Include More Than Just Ad Networks 843Analytics DoubleClick Reaches For Total Online Advertising Funnel 846Analytics Too Much Data Means Too Much Data 850Analytics 4 Ways to Humanize a Retargeting Campaign 852Analytics Digital Marketing Attribution: Tapping the Data Disruption 852Analytics 6 Tips for Using Propensity Models to Improve Response and Revenue 853Analytics Where am I? › Home › Column › Marketing › Marketing Automation 854Analytics TV Everywhere: Almost Everywhere, But Not Yet For Consumers 857Analytics TV Everywhere Apps Score Better On iPads Vs. Multichannel Distributors 858Analytics EU Cookie Law Could Be the Death of Digital 859Analytics CPG Study: Online Ad Campaigns Using Purchaser Data Nearly Triples ROI 863Analytics Yahoo Builds Browsers For Mobile, Desktop, Connects Ad Targeting Cross-Platform 865Analytics 3 Ways to Know When You Are Data Obese 865Analytics The Marriage Between Customer Data, Media Planning, and Media Buying 866Analytics In Push Toward Viewable Ad Impressions, Industry Has New Tool To Measure Them 867Analytics MEC Debuts Analytics Tool To Optimize Media Sales 869Analytics Mobile Ad Nets Challenged On Delivery, Targeting 869Analytics Ten Principles Of Analytics 871Analytics Web Watchers Ditch Video Ads 873Analytics The 6 Biggest Potholes of Marketing Automation 874Analytics Toning Your Marketing Automation Core 875Analytics Will Facebook Ads Follow Users Around The Web? 882Analytics Online Video Inching Closer to TV Metrics & GRPs 883Analytics Marketers Still Baffled, Suspicious of Agency Trading Desks 885Analytics Analytics Requires Complex Analysis, But Dont Be Scared Off 886Analytics Too Much Data Means Too Much Data 888Analytics Funnel Automation: Customer Conversion at Warp Speed 891Analytics What Do We Really Mean When We Say We Will Not Track Online? 893Analytics Attribution: IgnitionOne Gives Marketers Another View 895Analytics Should All Ad Impressions on Mobile Devices Really Count as ‘Mobile?’ 897Analytics Attribution Defined: What Every Marketer Needs To Know Now 899Analytics TV Universe Continues To Contract, Nielsen Attributes Declines To Census, TechnologyToo900Analytics Why digital GRPs are inevitable 901Analytics Analytics Is Never Too Big When You Can Act On It 905Analytics Behavioral Segmentation: How to Make the Most of Your Data 906Analytics Dashboards, Infographics, and Visualizations - Best Practices 908Analytics Why clicks are the wrong metric 910Analytics Half of Online Video Viewers Say There Are Too Many Ads 920Analytics Time to Stop Talking About Scale And Start Targeting 921Analytics Online Ad Effectiveness Research: Immediate Effect Measurement 923Analytics Click-Through Rates May Matter Even Less Than We Already Thought 929Analytics Google Proposes New Metrics for Online Advertising 932Analytics GRPs to online advertising as well. 932
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 6Analytics Funnel Automation: Customer Conversion at Warp Speed 933Analytics Key To Web Advertisings Future: Comparability To TV Ads 935Analytics Googles Brand Initiatives Bring Offline Metrics To Online Ads 939Analytics Why “Do Not Track” Probably Won’t Kill The Online Ad Industry 940Analytics Adometry Incorporates Impact Of Print, TV, Weather And More Into Attribution Services 941Analytics More than 25% of Video Viewing is Off the TV; Ad Predictions for 2012 942Analytics TV Everywhere Brings Networks Huge Opportunity With No Ad Skipping 945Analytics AOL Uses Nielsen Ratings, Peels Ad Dollars From TV 945Analytics Can comScore Knock Nielsen off Its Perch? 946Brazil Classe C cresce mais no interior que nas capitais 18Brazil Pesquisa revela perfis dos brasileiros nas redes sociais 94Brazil What Brazilians Will Buy in 2013 116Brazil A comScore Lança o Relatório ‘2013 Brazil Digital Future in Focus’ 118Brazil Brazil Now Among the Top 10 Online Video Markets in the World 133Brazil Pesquisa revela perfis dos brasileiros nas redes sociais 147Brazil comScore Releases ‘2013 Brazil Digital Future in Focus’ Report 212Brazil Latin America’s Media Landscape 2015-2017 265Brazil Brazil: Confronting the Productivity Challenge 276Brazil Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP, the Adnews reveals his plans for Brazil 536Brazil The Top 10 Trends in Brazilian Marketing and Media 710Brazil Reaching Brazil’s Exploding Mobile Market 711Content Retail executive lays out the future of content curation. 24Content Content Marketing: Its Not About Shock, but Good Storytelling 68Content The 3 Cs of Content Marketing 92Content Solving the Content Creation Conundrum 104Content Investor Focus Shifts to Content and Context 105Content 5 Content Marketing Trends for 2013 You Havent Heard Yet 137Content Why Analytics Isnt the End-All for Content Marketing 178Content Content Curation On Pinterest: How Brands Can Track ROI With Pinfluencer 184Content How to Create Your Content Marketing Game Plan 192Content Brand gTLD Strategies: Evolution of TV and Internet Content Distribution 238Content Coke tops creativity charts 263Content ABC, NBC and IFC Push Boundaries of In-Show Brand Integration 294Content In the World of Branded Content, Original Always Wins 333Content Connecting With Customers While Managing Branded Content and Channels 339Content Is Content Marketing the Future? Lessons for the Digital Engagement Path 350Infrastructure Google Fiber’s Ripple Effect 18Infrastructure What Happened When One Man Pinged the Whole Internet 22Mobile Coke Runs First All-Digital Effort, Focusing on Teens and Mobile Beverage giant debutsmulti-year initiative29Mobile BII REPORT: Why Mobile Video Is Set To Explode 45Mobile Men lead the way in mobile shopping 50Mobile Mobile Ad Networks Begin Taking a Back Seat to Publishers 52Mobile No Time to Waste: 6 Mobile Musts 69Mobile The M-Election: Mobility Enhances Donations And Citizen Scrutiny 93Mobile Mobile em 2013 122Mobile Brasil: País das redes sociais no celular 124Mobile Automakers embrace apps 183Mobile Brace Yourself, New Mobile Is Coming 191Mobile Mobile Payments Replacement for Small Change? 232Mobile Advanced Search: Women More Active In-Store Mobile Shoppers 250
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 7Mobile Who Will Win As Mobile Payments Go Mainstream? 263Mobile Mobile users cannot leave their phone alone for six minutes, check it 150 times a day 295Mobile Mobile Payments: The How vs. the Who 297Mobile Coca-Cola Sees Expansion In Mobile Future 340Mobile Your Guide to Surviving Life in the Appmosphere 347Mobile Is 2013 the Year of Mobile Video? 352Mobile Are Men The M-Commerce Sweet Spot? 353Mobile Facebook Upgrades Nearby Feature In Mobile 362Mobile BII REPORT: The State of Mobile Video 371Mobile Why Mobile Commerce Is Set To Explode 453Mobile Mobile device PawsyWalsy gets a big paws up from home alone dogs 512Mobile Mobile Shopping On Rise For Holidays 541Mobile BII REPORT: The Mobile Advertising Ecosystem Explained 560Mobile Big brands develop approach to mobile 572Mobile Bankers Chase Mobile In Latin America 627Mobile Brush Up On Your Smartphone Market 665Mobile Report: One-Third Of U.S. Moms Own Connected Devices, 97% Of iPad Moms ShoppedFrom Their Tablet Last Month682Mobile Most Common Place To Go Mobile: In Bed 724Mobile Facebook Says Its Mobile Problem Isnt a Problem 742Mobile Mobile Shopping Is Not Mobile Buying, And It Is Not Just About Being In-Store 878Mobile Mobile Video on Pace to Surpass Web Video in 2012 917Mobile Tablet Users Watch More TV, Viewing Drops On Laptops 946Optimisation Havas Media and DG Form Strategic Partnership for Digital and TV CampaignOptimization19Optimisation Despite Reservations, Programmatic Buying Gains Steam 34Optimisation Programmatic ad drive works for Ford 39Optimisation Starcom MediaVest, Twitter Reach Upfront TV Data Deal 41Optimisation Jeff Bezos Secrets to High Conversion Rates 41Optimisation Video on demand complements TV 51Optimisation Online Video: Too Popular for RTBs Own Good? 65Optimisation Online Video Targeting -- By Device And Audience -- On Rise 66Optimisation Cross-Platform Content Requires Cross-Platform Understanding 67Optimisation How To Handle Marketings New Video Challenge 82Optimisation Solving the Analytical Problem of Marketing Attribution 135Optimisation 4 Paths to Minimize Showrooming, Maximize Sales 138Optimisation Programatic Buying 140Optimisation Arbitron Begins Cross-Platform Work For ESPN 150Optimisation Six Ways To Understand Programmatic Markets 181Optimisation The war between programmatic buying and creativity 188Optimisation Brands build digital ad tools 207Optimisation Slow Economic Growth WIll Pressure Advertisers To Maximize ROI 267Optimisation Predictive analytics: The next big thing (and challenge) for b2b marketers 307Optimisation Real time bidding: Programming the ad-buying future 312Optimisation Execs Favor Brand-Specific Ratings, But C3 Remains 320Optimisation 10 Reasons Your Media Plan Needs to Include More Than Just Ad Networks 351Optimisation Facebook Readying Autoplay Video Ads 356Optimisation Facebook Prepares to Bring Video Ads to News Feed, Aims for TV Dollars 357Other Bolha imobiliária estourando? Onde? 51Other The 6 Keys To Being Awesome At Everything 55Other OMD Wins Experian Media Assignment 56
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 8Other Watchmaker Asks Appeals Court To Revive Case Against Amazon 75Other More Essentials of Marketing 83Other Ant Keogh’s DOs and DON’Ts 87Other Make Yourself an Expert 91Other Why Advertising Agencies Must Disrupt Themselves 95Other JetBlues Loyalty Lessons: Let Customers Decide 96Other Digital Video Ad Spend Up 18% So Far in 2012 100Other Study: Web Marketing More Than Twice Ad Spending Online 101Other Classic Jack: One Year Ahead of The Times and Ad Age 104Other 3 Ways to Get People to Change 113Other Latin America’s Media Landscape 2015-2017 126Other Google predicts seismic ad shift 130Other Google generated about $40bn in total ad revenue in 2012. 130Other 10 Due Diligence Tests: Ensuring you get the Right Job 132Other Havas Worldwide Launches Shared Owned & Earned Media Unit 140Other O acordo do Google com os meios impressos, saiu 1 novo caminho 142Other Kids addicted to fast food app 146Other Should CMOs Own Digital Strategy? Maybe Not 152Other Semantic Search in 2025 156Other Ibope terá novo sistema para medir publicidade na web 167Other Buzzkill: Coca-Cola Finds No Sales Lift from Online Chatter 168Other The ABCs Of Video Ad Management 172Other Pews State Of The News Media Report: Print Ads Down $1.5 Billion; Digital Up 3% 198Other Social News Site Extends Advertiser Campaigns to Other Homepages 202Other The worst mistakes you can make when you start a new job 204Other Morning rituals for men that will improve appearance 208Other Digital redesenha modelos de negócio 210Other SEO Friendly WordPress in 12 Steps 218Other Slam Dunk: Phizzle Adds Sizzle to Sports Marketing with Mobile, Social Campaigns 229Other Is This the Most Important Person in Advertising? 235Other The Future Of Advertising Will Be... 254Other Au Revoir, Business Travel 256Other Insider Facebook Marketing Secrets 257Other Nielsen Redefines Television, Will Include Internet-Only Connected Sets, Households 259Other Video Consumer Mapping Study 265Other How to Approach Social-Media Commerce 268Other BII REPORT: Why The "Second Screen" Industry Is Set To Explode 273Other 9 Subtle Traits Of The Most Talented Leaders 274Other You Attract More Barflies With Fun Than With Savings 287Other Video Viewing Rises, But Growth Rates Slow 288Other Ad Group Says No Reason To Oppose Nielsen-Arbitron Deal 292Other IPG Mediabrands CEO, Consultant Push Pay-For-Performance Model 299Other Why Every Pitch is a Digital Pitch 299Other Why Your Online Marketing Department Is All Screwed Up 301Other Management Is (Still) Not Leadership 305Other What Advertisers Really Pay For 318Other The Most Important Interview Question of All Time - Part 1 327Other The ANSWER to "The Most Important Interview Question of All Time" Part 2 328Other Job-seekers: How to Answer “The Most Important Interview Question of All Time” – Part3329Other What is Your Blue Ocean Career Strategy? 330
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 9Other Starting Out: 334Other Alcohol companies market to children on Facebook and internet 342Other Feliz 2020 343Other 5 Ways to Begin Designing Your Life in 2013 344Other 5 Mistakes I Continue To Make in My Marriage 345Other 7 digital marketing trends to watch in 2013 354Other Five Lessons from Four Years at Samasource 366Other P&G anuncia Pelé como novo embaixador 374Other Agency of the Year: Gold -- Digitas 379Other Rules I’ve Learned and Live by to Motivate People and Organizations 381Other My Rule #2 for Motivating People and Organizations 383Other Part I: Validate Your Business Model Start With a Business Model, Not a Business Plan 391Other Globo pode fechar o ano com pior média em SP 431Other What happens in your body when... 432Other Leadership 101: Throw People in Over Their Heads and See What Happens 434Other Magna Global Revises Ad Forecast, Dips To 3.1% Growth In 13 434Other ZO, GroupM Predict Ad Spend Hits $574B By 2015 436Other As It Nears the End, Lessons From 30 Rock 437Other To Bundle, or Not to Bundle: Mags Grapple With iPad Subs 440Other Small Agencies Crush Big Ones: Its Not Even Close 462Other Top 10 Ways to Stretch Your Advertising Dollars 470Other Report: 51% of web site traffic is non-human and mostly malicious 479Other "We are facing the future," sees Florisbal 487Other Making The Most Of Your New Media Budget, Part 1 494Other Making The Most Of Your New Media Budget, Part 2 496Other Ford Promotes Random Acts Of Fusion Video Randomly 514Other How to be a master networker: golden rules of networking 533Other Executive burnout costing billions 538Other Glance at the 2011 Fortune Global 500 and you’ll quickly note the large representation ofChinese companies—61, to be exact.551Other Unilever seeks new way forward 571Other Two days at NuYu Total Health Retreat = ten life lessons 573Other 10 brilliant quotes from Warren Buffett - the worlds greatest investor 580Other How to survive the nine stages of marriage from wedded bliss to mid-life malaise 585Other ROCKWELL ARCHITECTS ON THE DIGITAL STORYTELLING THROUGH PHYSICAL SPACE 593Other Adaption: Key to Success for Future of Ad World 612Other Master these 11 habits to guarantee success 615Other Internet no Brasil cresceu 16% em um ano, revela Ibope 619Other Match Your Presentation to Your Audience 627Other Creative Agencies Tap Into Other Talents By Temporarily Swapping Staff 628Other Make the Job a Game 631Other How simple people become superstars and create great wealth 636Other CDO Abril Media, Manoel Lemos talks about monetization, convergence, and mobileintegration between paper and digital platforms638Other Say No to Extra Work 641Other Create a Vision that Motivates Your Team 642Other Fall Into Your Next Career Move 642Other The Agency-Client Relationship is Forever Changed 643Other Walter Graff from Bluesky Media 652Other Two questions behind every disagreement 653Other Five body language myths busted 660
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 10Other What Successful Night Owls Get Done Before Bed 674Other Pick One Project 674Other Combat Clutter 675Other Hit The “Idea” Bar 675Other Late Night Rendezvous 675Other A writer’s cheat sheet: 10 useful reminders 680Other Magazines Make Branded Content, So Why Dont They Act More Like Brands? 714Other The Ad Contrarian’s Reality Check 718Other Greatest Threat to the Ad Business 719Other Microsoft lança Outlook, novo serviço de e-mail 31 de julho de 2012 · 14h22 725Other Five Stories That Remind Us How Quickly Things Are Changing These Days 736Other Microsofts radical new business plan is hidden in plain sight 737Other Amazons recommendation secret 739Other A Glimpse Into The Future Of Online Advertising 741Other Takeaways From Forrester’s 2012 CMO Study 744Other The Two Most Important Things to Know From Its First Earnings Report 745Other AppNexus CEO to Potential Investors: We Dont Need Your Money 746Other COCA-COLA AIRS OLYMPICS TV SHOW IN OVER 30 COUNTRIES 750Other Justa mente 750Other The Perfect Storm 760Other 2012 Holiday Marketing Tips for Retailers 763Other How to Create Good Infographics Quickly & Cheaply 770Other Kellogg Debuts Loyalty Program with In-pack Codes 772Other Turbo-Charging Thought Leadership Efforts With Google Authorship Markup 773Other Random House TV launches to create shows based on books 780Other FREMANTLEMEDIA & RANDOM HOUSE FORM EXCLUSIVE TELEVISION PARTNERSHIP 780Other The Learning Enterprise 782Other 5 Reasons Digital Marketing Agencies Are Booming (and 4 Reasons You Might Need One) 796Other Why Microsoft Is Going It Alone With Do-Not-Track 804Other Not That Special: The Hollywood Version 809Other What Do Patients Really Want? 810Other How to Create Marketing Videos on the Cheap 822Other Digital Agencies: Heres Your Wake-Up Call 823Other Whos The Chief Experience Officer? 827Other BBDO Creatives Dissect Breakthrough Spots 829Other Woe The Digital Sale: What Does Viewable Mean, Anyway? 829Other SAPIENTNITRO EXEC EXPLAINS HOW TO SPEAK TO THE DIGITAL CONSUMER [CANNES] 834Other Automation as the Key to Modern Agency Growth 839Other Microsoft Brings IE To Xbox; Integration Could Help Future Ad Targeting 846Other Reminder: Online Video Is The Afghanistan Of Media Industry 855Other Dishs Auto-Hop Ad Skipper Versus Networks 856Other Can TV Survive AutoHop? 857Other MPG CEO Maria Luisa Francoli Plaza on Crossing Cultural Barriers 861Other Starcom, Dish Battle Over Ad-Skipping AutoHop 870Other 6 Habits of Truly Memorable People 877Other Agencies Going After Accenture, Deloitte IT 879Other What Revision3s Sale Means for the Online Video Industry 887Other For Many, Web Videos Actual Value Trails Its Massive Hype 892Other What Facebooks Critics Dont Understand: Its a Platform, Not a Publisher 894Other Every Screen is a TV; Nielsen Says Gaming Consoles, Mobile Viewing Up 896Other MAGNAGLOBAL’s US Advertising Forecast: “US ad market still growing amidst economic 897
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 11fragility. Core media to grow by 2.2% in 2012”.Other Nielsen: Americans Love TV, Viewing Options Change 900Other Know When to Manage and When to Coach 903Other Five New Management Metrics You Need To Know Bruce UpbinForbes Staff 903Other Not All Inventory Was Created Equal 908Other Internet Advertising Is Still Dwarfed By TV 909Other Facebook - The Future of Branded Video Channels? 909Other The 10 Most Unexpected Media Placements Weve Seen 910Other Adlands New Era of Specialization 911Other Going Virtual: Technology Not Seen as Substitution for Touch 913Other Whos Behind the Agency Twitter Feed: McCann Erickson 913Other Why We Are (And Are Not) In A Startup Bubble 914Other If The Web Helps TV Advertising, What Will Help Online Video Ads? Better Programming 915Other Your Ad Agency Is A Contractor, Not A Partner 916Other The internet flexes its muscle 917Other News Items Reveal A Changing T/V Landscape 918Other Google AdWords Video Launches, Facebook Misses Q1 919Other Internet supera jornal e se torna segunda mídia em 2012, diz IAB 922Other Eliminate Media Fragmentation and Make Clients Happy 926Other Does the 80/20 Rule Still Apply to Web Advertising? 926Other $500 CPMs? The Power Of Advertising At Point Of Decision 927Other Americans Watch Billions Of Video Ads Monthly 931Other Andreessens Market Focus Pays Off For Instagram 936Other When leaders are scarce, employees look to peers 937Other The Demise Of The PC Could Be Slightly Exaggerated 938Other Adobe Releases Online Video Ad Monetization Report 941Planning A nova mídia digital é simples 21Planning Six Current and Six Rapidly Expanding Trends Marketers Should Focus On 26Planning Simple Ways to Achieve a Brainstorming Breakthrough 28Planning Agency briefs must improve 31Planning Andrew Keen: Globo foi estúpida e imprudente 40Planning Thanks to DVR and Streaming Services, Binge TV Viewers Abound 46Planning Maioria pula anúncios em vídeos online 48Planning Women Are Watching More TV, Video, Prefer Positive Ad Messages 57Planning How Coca-Cola found its creative groove 61Planning Convergence Analytics Delivers New Paradigm for Holistic Insights Into CustomerBehavior70Planning Survey: 90% Of Customers Say Buying Decisions Are Influenced By Online Reviews 72Planning More + More Devices = More Multitasking 74Planning Shoppers In Buying Mode More Receptive To Online Ads 76Planning 15 Types of Email Marketing Tests You Should Be Doing 79Planning Report: Many TV Stations To Add Online Video To Advertising Mix 80Planning Using Visual Story Telling To Build Stronger Relationships With Consumers 86Planning Income, Education Levels Impact TV Viewing 88Planning Connected device usage diverges: 90Planning Psychological Priming And The Path To Purchase 91Planning How Google Views Predictive Models 97Planning Web Analytics Is Dead, Long Live Digital Intelligence 98Planning The Acute Heptagram of Impact 100Planning Starting an Unlikely Conversation: U by Kotex Wants People to Talk about "The V Word" 103Planning The five types of men: Which one are you? 107
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 12Planning The five types of women - by a woman 111Planning The Key to Branded Apps Is to Uncover Their Consumer Utility 114Planning Feliz 2020 117Planning Quem é você nas redes sociais? 119Planning Targeted Serendipity: Thinking Harder About Relevance 141Planning Lets ban the word Television - epilogue 143Planning Stop Reinventing Disruption 152Planning The Never-Ending Consideration Phase 159Planning Navigating The Nuances Of Customer Segmentation And Searcher Personas 160Planning Mental Models For UX, Search And Conversion 162Planning Psychographic Targeting Unhinged! The Zen Of “Whole Customer” Persona Modeling 163Planning How Google Views Predictive Models 167Planning 5 Facts You Need to Know About Convergence Analytics 177Planning S.C.O.R.E.: Impact Modeling Through User-initiated Actions 180Planning What Convergence Means For Digital Video 182Planning Brand websites named top priority in US 187Planning The New Brand Building Reality 194Planning How to use body language to get what you want at work 197Planning The Battle for the Living Room Is Over — The War for the Consumer Is On 199Planning OmnicomMediaGroup and ESPN International Study Reveals that Latin American SportsFans Consume Sports on More Devices than Ever, Use Social Media for Sports Information206Planning Emails Role In The User Experience 213Planning Welcome To The Enterprise Phase Of Marketing 214Planning 5 Tips to Improve Your Press Releases 227Planning Why Innovation By Brainstorming Doesnt Work 239Planning Advertising Analytics 2.0 241Planning Mobile Showrooming Leads To In-Store Sales 248Planning Time With Video Underscores Need For Fine-Tuned Cross-Media Placements 251Planning When it comes to social media; are women from Venus and men from Mars? 252Planning Vehicle Purchase Doesnt End With Purchase 257Planning Digital Influence: How the Internet Affects New Product Purchase Decisions 261Planning A Multi-Mix Media Approach Drives New Product Awareness 289Planning Dont Let Strategy Become Planning 290Planning Shopping Is Not Solving 296Planning Avoiding The Wrong Kind Of Customer 306Planning How to listen 307Planning PHD Perspectives: Media Trends: the Convergence of Divergence 321Planning PHD Perspectives: Analog Ghosts 322Planning Underneath the Funnel 348Planning 2013 Digital Marketing Trends: Brand Conversation To Commerce 361Planning Let’s ban the word Television – part 1 363Planning Innovation Requires Courage and Intelligence, But Not Permission 365Planning A CMOs 6 Tests for Evaluating Effective Marketing Programs 368Planning Are GenYers and Baby-Boomers compatible ? 374Planning Real Gamification Mechanics Require Simplicity And, Yes, Game Designers Can Do It 386Planning 4 Types of Markets, 4 Ways to Gauge Them 394Planning What Is Todays Networked Mom Thankful For? 396Planning Web Design Correlates With Purchase Power 397Planning The Whole Story - Social Media and TV 400Planning Facebook And Microsoft Are Working On A Deal, And It Could Change Everything AboutAdvertising403
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 13Planning 9 tendências em redes sociais para 2013 406Planning Navigating The Nuances Of Customer Segmentation And Searcher Personas 411Planning Psychographic Targeting Unhinged! The Zen Of “Whole Customer” Persona Modeling 412Planning Top 10 Trends For 2013 419Planning Weekly Roundup: The World in 2013, conscientious consumption and nail polish fordudes422Planning Twenty years of text messaging 426Planning Mapping the Future: 3 Essential Terms You Must Redefine Today 430Planning Reaching Generation X: Authenticity in Advertising 443Planning Savvy Shoppers Use Connectivity to Score Deals on the Go 444Planning Mobile Along The Path To Purchase: An Unrealized Opportunity For Marketers 446Planning Gartner says that 80% of gamified apps driven by novelty and hype will fail. 448Planning 1 More Obituary for the Website 450Planning My Prediction: Prediction Is Going to Be Hot in 2013 452Planning Thankful For Time Spent Together All Year Long 454Planning Source It: PHD Revamps Global Planning With Gaming System 457Planning D.O.A.: Death of Advertising 458Planning FiOS TV for iPad: A Clear Vision for the Future 461Planning Ten consumer trends for 2013 463Planning SEO – Content | Confusion | Clarity 465Planning Streaming Video - The Looming Battle 478Planning Multitasking Media Impacts TVs Dominance 481Planning Engagement Key To Making Mobile Work 484Planning Multitasking Media Impacts TVs Dominance 485Planning Brand "soul" key for PepsiCo 490Planning Pinterest: 5 Tactics for This Visual Social Media Mecca 491Planning Coca-Cola Relaunches Website as Socially Enabled Digital Platform 493Planning Its Duh-Duh-Duh…Digital Stupid 506Planning Bridging the Gap Between On-the-Go and On-the-Couch 507Planning Video Ad Exchanges Make The Grade 508Planning Apps For The Moment 509Planning This AmEx Ad Stays on TV Constantly. You Just Need to Find It 510Planning Four Performance Marketing Trends To Watch In 2013 513Planning Video Advertising Lessons From The 2012 Elections 513Planning The End of the TV-Centric Era 518Planning What the Multitasking Myth Means for Media Buying 520Planning The Key Ingredient to Successful Engagement Campaigns 521Planning Apple sets its sites on the automotive industry 531Planning Coke takes new approach on the web 533Planning 3 Essential Audience Development Tips for Digital Publishers 537Planning The dynamic digital world 540Planning 6 Ways to Use Images to Improve Your Web Conversion Rate 544Planning Is A Picture Worth A Thousand Votes? Depends On Who Is Conquesting Whose 548Planning Mums turn to Facebook for me-time 557Planning Coca Cola turns to content marketing: Content 2020 558Planning Study: Some Skepticism About Online Ads, Video Content Important 559Planning Study: Brands Get Big Uptick By Using Facebook Ads 559Planning Google Plans to Combine Mobile and Desktop Ads 563Planning Its Time To Toss Average Frequency Into The Bucket 565Planning Web Presence Key Digital Spend For SMBs 567Planning Forget Traditional TV Ads, Think Online Video Advertising! 577
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 14Planning Build It And Theyll Stay Put? 579Planning Reduce Barriers, Add Value 584Planning The Entirely Surprising Thing Teens Demand From Brands 588Planning Forbes Embraces Custom Brand Content With Social Video Play 589Planning Forrester Profiles Smartphone and Tablet App Users 596Planning The True Value Of TrueView 601Planning Video Advertisers in Canada Want Their GRPs 604Planning Ed Cotton: Why Brands Need Places Of Origin 609Planning TV Beats Online, Print In News Consumption 611Planning Eight Mistakes to Avoid in a Sampling Program 613Planning Cokes Wendy Clark at Digital Conference: Liquid and Linked Is Key 620Planning Make Your Brand Story E.P.I.C. And Consumers Will Follow 629Planning The One Advantage Of Online Video Is Also Its Biggest Disadvantage 635Planning Content Sponsorships - The Perfect Partnership 645Planning Six audiences 652Planning Memory and media 653Planning A simple truth about photo albums 654Planning The Demise Of Main Stream Media, One Constituency At A Time 654Planning 9 Trends Defining Consumer Engagement 655Planning Smartphone generation smarter than you think 663Planning Shopper Marketings True Potential 667Planning Pinterest Offers Unique Millennial Opportunities 678Planning Advertising fails to reach target audiences on American TV 684Planning Celebrity endorsement: The trigonometry of talent 686Planning Cliffhangers: Great for Television, Disastrous for Decisions 691Planning Cutting Through the Clutter: 5 Characteristics of Winning TV Ads 692Planning The Future of Planning 692Planning TV ads may make unhappy tweens materialistic 695Planning EA Shifts TV and Print Budget to Facebook 698Planning Omni-Channel Marketing: Your Next Challenge 699Planning Stop Asking Permission And Begin 701Planning Why Brands are Becoming Publishers 706Planning Ad Clutter Rises - 5 Ways to Fight It 709Planning Why Online Ads Perform Well in Latin America 710Planning Report: More than 1/3 of U.S. Adults are ‘Always Addressable’ 712Planning Cable Operators Losing Video Subscribers 717Planning How To Boost Online Retail Sales With Video, Call To Action 720Planning Pros and Cons of Click to Play (CTP) Advertising 726Planning 4 Ways to Build a Winning Digital Contest 730Planning How to Make Real Connections With Teen Girls: : Three Lessons From Being A Miss TeenUSA Judge731Planning Stone Soup And The Lost Art Of Storylistening 748Planning Digital Strategy: 4 Psychology Tips to Improve Brand Messaging 751Planning The importance of message 752Planning And the psychology? 752Planning Social styles with Merrill and Reid 753Planning Cognitive Dissonance and the Call to Action 753Planning Creative emotion with James-Lange and memory 753Planning Through the looking glass self with Cooley and Maslow 754Planning What Does Semantic Search Mean for SEO? 756Planning Marketing Lessons For The New Web: Four Success Tips 787
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 15Planning Dont Forget Content In Your Video Ad Campaigns 790Planning Speaking Your Target Audiences Language 794Planning 5 Things to Remember When Going Local 795Planning Stop Targeting 803Planning Great Brands Are About Fusing Product And Service. How Do You Do It? 818Planning Where Is Search Heading? Check the Map 825Planning The New Competitive Landscape For Online Advertising 832Planning Tapping the Power of Brand Advocates 840Planning Consumer Trust in Online, Social and Mobile Advertising Grows 862Planning TV Dramas Account for Most Primetime Viewing, Timeshifting and Ad Spend 863Planning Retailers and Brands: Being Digital in a Connected-Consumer World 863Planning Advertising in the Age of Choice 867Planning Creating A Destination After Media Exposure 872Planning The Ultimate Content Development Checklist 876Planning Redefining The Consumer Engagement Path 883Planning Long- And Short-Form Videos: Complementary Pieces In Ad Strategy Puzzle 884Planning Connected TVs Offer Appetizing Distribution Platform 902Planning 10 Online Shopping Personality Traits 906Planning Time Inc. Study Reveals That "Digital Natives" Switch Between Devices and PlatformsEvery Two Minutes, Use Media to Regulate Their Mood924Planning Fickle "Digital Natives" Switch Platforms Every Other Minute 925Planning Good Marketing = The Perfect Crime 930Planning Deloittes "Entanglement" Model For B2B Digital Marketing 930Planning Multitasking TV-Plus-Mobile Video Test Campaign Shows Big Brand And Intent Lifts 942Planning Gen Y: The Digital Divide Gets Deeper 943Social Putting Into Practice: Facebook Open Graph 523Social For Facebook Success, Reckitt Takes Lessons From Walmart 535Social Unilever social experiment to shape marketing 541Social Facebook Rolls Out Gift-Giving Feature 603Social Facebook Declines In Social Video Engagement, Web Site Visits Rise 617Social Why Agencies Are Better Equipped To Get Search + Social 622Social Traditional Strategy Is Dead. Welcome to the #SocialEra 623Social Three Things Facebook Needs To Nail With Search 630Social Google makeover for Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon 634Social Using Instagram for Social Media Marketing 669Social The Rise Of Visual Social Media 673Social Social Element Will Move Mobile Payments To Next Level 720Social Is Social A Marketing Tool Or A CRM Tool? 723Social Empresa acusa Facebook de usar robôs que simulam cliques em anúncios 725Social How to Win Friends and Influence People on the Internet 732Social Exclusive: The Man Who Revs Facebook’s Money Engine 740Social New York Facebook Already Thinks It’s Better Dressed Than California Facebook 740Social How thoughtful social media strategy can influence people to buy 744Social Optimizing Social Media Across the Customer Lifecycle 754Social A Timeline of Recent Facebook Ad Changes 768Social Promoted Tweets See 1% to 3% Engagement on Average 769Social Twitter Enhances Promo Tweet Geo-targeting 769Social Setting The Record Straight: 5 Common Misconceptions About Instagram 773Social Espalhe Guerrilla Marketing Team Shares Tips for Breaking Through in Social Media 791Social The Marketers New Role: From Branding to Buying on Facebook 808Social Agency Execs Ready For Facebook Ad Network 814
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 16Social Do You Have a Long-Term Social Media Marketing Plan? 836Social Study: Paid, Earned Media On Facebook Boost Purchases 837Social Campaigns Are Not Conversions: 7 Steps to Unclog the Funnel 847Social Is Facebook Destroying Trust in Marketers? 848Social Funnel Automation: Customer Conversion at Warp Speed 849Social Open Up New Doors With Facebooks Open Graph 850Social Can We Be Friends? Delivering Active And Authentic Audiences Through Social Sharing 858Social IBM Study: If You Dont Have a Social CEO, Youre Going to be Less Competitive 872Social Can We Be Friends? Delivering Active And Authentic Audiences Through Social Sharing 928Social The Yin And Yang Of Facebook Ads 935Social Why Bother With Google+? 944Technology Introducing the New LinkedIn Contacts: A Smarter Way to Stay in Touch 29Technology The Rise of the Term Glasshole, Explained by Linguists 37Technology How Will Google Glass Change Internet Marketing? 42Technology Welcome to the Post-Ad-Tech Era 67Technology How People Use Facebook On Smartphones 78Technology Social ads deliver in Brazil 93Technology Amazon: No Profit On Hardware, Aims For Software Monies 102Technology TECHNOLOGICAL OVERLOAD 105Technology HTML5 vs. Apps: Heres Why The Debate Matters, And Who Will Win 114Technology Facebook Will Launch Content-Specific News Feeds, Bigger Photos And Ads On Thursday 127Technology RMG Unveils ChalkboxTV 228Technology Foursquare Partners With Visa and MasterCard to Give Discounts When Users Shop:Company Will Take a Cut of Offers Redeemed233Technology IAB Unveils LUMA-esque Ad Tech Chart 249Technology Ad Networks Beware: Firefox to Block Third-Party Cookies 255Technology 2013: The Year Of Responsive Web Design 311Technology Facebook Rolls Out Gift Cards 314Technology YouTube to switch on paid-for video 323Technology Microsoft puts Office in the cloud 323Technology Silicon : Secular Force in Videogames 325Technology New application from Abine works to wipe your personal information from the Internet 336Technology Amazon Just Fired A Missile At Apples iTunes Business 340Technology Facebook App Underscores Mobile Future 372Technology HTML5 vs. Apps: Why The Debate Matters, And Who Will Win 402Technology Instagram: The new kind of product placement 449Technology Five Ways Brands Can Be Thankful For Instagram 515Technology Automotive industry partners with Apple on Siri 532Technology HTML5 vs. Apps: Why The Debate Matters, And Who Will Win 575Technology Moments, Media and Modes: Devices Offer A Big Do-Over 602Technology Video Ads Go Native With Sharethrough 611Technology Procter & Gamble taps new tech trends 626Technology iPhone 5 To Have Major Impact On Users, Tech Rivals 650Technology What Every Marketer Needs to Know About Hadoop 677Technology Is HTML5 the End of Native Mobile Apps? 702Technology Clash Group Launches Unique Pre-Roll Video Ad Platform for Web, Mobile 712Technology GPS Fails at Olympics, Twitter Blamed 734Technology IAB Pushes For DIY Ad Units, Modules 735Technology Battle Of The ETA: GPS Vs. Android Vs. iPhone 779Technology QuadrantOne Unveils Targeting Tools For Newspaper Sites 781Technology Aereo Win Could Be a Turning Point for Online Video 791
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 17Technology Local Search: The Dream 801Technology Algorithm Lets Wi-Fi-Connected Cars Share Data 802Technology Techno freaks juggle for control over apps 809
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 18Classe C cresce mais no interior que nas capitaisDados são destacados pelo novo estudo da NeoTVpor Andréa ValerioMeirelles: entender a nova classe média hoje é entender a classe A e B de amanhã‚O interior, a nova classe média e o mercado de TV por assinatura‛. Esse foi o tema da pesquisa apresentada por Renato Meirelles, sócio-diretor do Datapopular, durante a 11ª edição do Expo e Congresso NeoTV, que começou nesta terça-feira (23), em São Paulo. Segundo oexecutivo, o objetivo da pesquisa foi abordar, de forma mais aprofundada, as mudanças que vem acontecendo no país e mostrar quem são osverdadeiros protagonistas.Para Meirelles, entre os diferenciais do estudo está a constatação de que dois agentes foram responsáveis pela maioria das transformações.‚Um deles é a tão falada classe media e o outro é o consumidor do interior, que tem crescido mais do que do restante do pais‛. Ele destacouque, de acordo com o levantamento, essa parcela da população tem impulsionado todo o consumo, incluindo o de TV por assinatura.Outro dado importante da pesquisa, segundo o executivo, são as classes A e B, que também cresceram nos últimos anos, cerca de 7%, edevem crescer o dobro do volume nos próximos dez. Para ele, um ponto importante que precisa ser observado é que, nos próximos anos, osconsumidores das classes mais altas terão mais renda para consumir, mas o modo de pensar será o mesmo da C, já que são emergentes. ‚Porisso, entender a nova classe média hoje é entender a classe A e B de amanhã‛, ressaltou.Meirelles lembrou também a constatação do levantamento de que a classe média cresceu mais no interior do Brasil do que nas capitais. ‚Parase ter uma ideia, de cada dez brasileiros da classe media, seis são do interior‛. Outro ponto detectado pela pesquisa é que o crescimento darenda dos últimos anos permitiu a ampliação e a diversificação do consumo da classe média brasileira. Segundo o estudo, essa parcela dapopulação já representa 51% dos consumidores de internet e 45% dos assinantes de TV por assinatura.Google Fiber‘s Ripple EffectThe threat of superfast Google Fiber is causing other Internet providers to crank up their own offerings.By David Talbot on April 26, 2013Why It MattersThe United States is 16th in the world in broadband availability, speed, and price.As Google plans to expand its ultrafast Internet service from a fledging effort in Kansas City to Austin, Texas, and Provo, Utah, evidence isemerging that the company has forced broadband competitors into offering dramatically better service.New data from Akamai, which delivers a hefty portion of all Web traffic, reveals a remarkable turn of events in Kansas. In the fourth quarter of2012, Kansas saw the largest jump in average Internet connection speeds of all U.S. states compared to the fourth quarter of 2011, with an 86percent surge (see ‚When Will the Rest of Us Get Google Fiber?‛). The next-highest increase was in Wyoming, at 51 percent.Google began installations in November in Kansas City, Kansas, offering one-gigabit Internet connections„nearly 100 times faster than the U.S.average„for $70 per month, or $120 with television service, a Nexus 7 tablet remote, two terabytes of DVR storage, plus another a terabyteof cloud storage. The rollout and TV service had been announced a few months before. ‚It could be the case that the other incumbent providerswere going, ‘Oh, crap, we stand to potentially lose subscribers to this deal with Google if we don’t provide competitive service,’ ‛ says DavidBelson, who authored Akamai’s state of the Internet report.There is no public data that gives a complete picture of the speed improvements or price reductions that Internet service providers in theKansas City area made in response to the beginning of the Google service, which delivers broadband over fiber-optic lines. But SusanCrawford, a professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York and former special assistant for technology policy in the Obamaadministration, says her research suggests that Google is indeed the driving force in the Kansas market.In December, Time Warner Cable increased speeds of some services in the Kansas City area, boosting its ‚turbo‛ service from 15 megabits persecond to 20 megabits per second and its fastest service from 50 to 100 megabits per second. ‚I see Time Warner Cable in and aroundKansas City acting like a bulldog with a bone,‛ says Crawford, author of Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry & Monopoly Power in theGilded Age. ‚They want to make sure they hang onto subscribers, not lose them.‛In general, there is plenty that the dominant Internet providers can do to provide better deals without much effort, she says. Cable companieslike Time Warner Cable and Comcast have the technical capacity to speed up service, and also plenty of room to lower prices, given theestimate from one analyst„Craig Moffet of the Wall Street firm Bernstein Research„that they typically make 97 percent profit margins onInternet services.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 19The competition may be even hotter in the newer Google Fiber battlegrounds. After Google announced plans for Austin (see ‚Google FiberTakes on Texas‛), AT&T quickly announced it would match that effort with its own one-gigabit service, and Time Warner Cable sweetened itsInternet plans with free Wi-Fi in public areas to existing customers.Google has not disclosed how many customers it has in Kansas City, or what plans those customers bought. But Akamai was able to do someforensic work to see just how small Google’s service footprint was, and thus just how little it took to wake up the competition.According to Belson, in the fourth quarter of last year, Google had less than a tenth of a percent of the 800,000 Internet subscribers inKansas, or fewer than 800 customers. ‚Ultimately, we didn’t see enough unique IP addresses from [Google] that those speeds would haveunduly influenced the overall [speed] calculation,‛ Belson says.Even more remarkable, perhaps, was that Google Fiber customers were using far less than the available blazing speed. IP addresses associatedwith Google Fiber were seeing average connection speeds of twice the Kansas average of five megabits, and peak speeds of five timesgreater than the average of 25 megabits.Some of this might be explained by the fact that some Google Fiber customers took only a basic hookup with five-megabit service for a one-time $300 installation fee, and did not accept the fast service. But the larger reality is that, so far, ‚there is not a whole lot of stuff out theretoday that is really gigabit-capable,‛ Belson says.Nonetheless, gigabit speeds have proved to be quite capable of waking up a nation of Internet service monopolies and duopolies (see ‚A Taleof Two Genachowskis‛).Havas Media and DG Form Strategic Partnership for Digital and TVCampaign OptimizationWritten on Apr 26, 2013 Author AdotasWireNEW YORK (ADOTAS) ” Havas Media announced today that it has partnered with DG (NASDAQ: DGIT) to deliver the first integrated solutionfor online and TV campaign management. The global partnership brings together Havas Media’s digital and media expertise and DG’sMediaMind and VideoFusion technologies at the core of Havas Media worldwide operations.This step allows Havas Media to advance its strategy in becoming the leader in cross-media and content marketing globally. Havas Media willintegrate its specialized units such as Artemis (the group’s global data management network) with DG’s MediaMind Online products and DG’sVideoFusion TV solutions. The partnership between the two companies will remove obstacles that hinder the convergence of marketing acrossTV and Online. As both companies focus on client-side optimization, advertisers worldwide will now benefit from a unique value proposition ofintegrated media and technology across digital and TV.‚As part of our strategic efforts to promote agility between all our teams and disciplines at the core of our organisation, DG is a naturalpartner for us due to the openness and scale of their MediaMind and VideoFusion platforms as well as their continued commitment toinnovation,‛ said Stéphanie Marie, in charge of Digital Operations, Havas Media Global. ‚DG’s solutions and continued effort to bridge the gapbetween Online and TV allow us to present clients with a shared vision that meets consumer demand for more meaningful connections.‛With a recent re-alignment of its business under a simplified structure, Havas Media has placed its digital expertise and content marketing atthe core of its operations. Similarly, DG has recently united all of its solutions under the same master brand, creating the largest independentadvertising technology platform in the market, managing more than 10% of the world’s media spend.‚As the worlds of TV and online converge, marketers are seeking technology partners who can deliver cross-channel consumer engagementand analytics,‛ said Neil Nguyen, DG’s President and CEO. ‚DG is uniquely positioned to accelerate the convergence of advertising across anever increasing number of screens. We welcome the opportunity to provide Havas Media clients a multi-screen solution covering distribution,reporting and analytics for TV and Online.‛About Havas MediaHavas Media is the main media brand of Havas Media Group and operates in 126 countries.Our mission is to unite brands and people through meaningful connections and drive business success. We service clients through a portfolio ofspecialist teams that span media, strategy, international management, digital, mobile, social media, experiential, entertainment and sport. Oursimplified and integrated structure has allowed us to build one of the most integrated, agile and responsive global teams in the industry.Further information can be found at www.havasmedia.com or follow us on Twitter @HavasMediaAbout DG
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 20DG (NASDAQ: DGIT) is the leading global multiscreen advertising management and distribution platform, fueling campaign management acrossTV, online, mobile and beyond. Through a combination of technology and services, DG empowers brands and advertisers to work faster,smarter and more competitively. Boasting the world’s largest hybrid satellite and internet network for broadcast video delivery, the company’sunparalleled campaign management encompasses multiscreen ad delivery, cross-channel research and analytics, and unified asset management.The DG product portfolio consists of two overarching product lines for online and video campaign management: MediaMind and VideoFusion.With New York as a center of operations, DG is a global company that connects over 14,000 advertisers and 7,400 agencies worldwide withtheir targeted audiences through an expansive network of over 50,000 media destinations across TV broadcast and digital advertising in 78countries, managing approximately ten percent of the world’s media assets.Not All DMPs are Created Equal: What Every Smart Marketer ShouldKnowWritten on Apr 26, 2013 Author Rob GattoADOTAS ” As the ad-tech ecosystem has evolved over the past two to three years, I hear a lot of major brands, agencies andnetworks/marketplaces asking about data management platforms (DMPs). Some have called the DMP ‚the gateway to the next step in theevolution of digital marketing‛ or the ‚layer of technology that will literally touch and enhance every part of your business.‛ I agree that DMPshave a long-lasting place in the industry versus being just a shiny new object, but to truly add as much value as possible, a DMP needs toincorporate:Data Management: The pipes for data collection, normalization, moving data around and preparation for analysis. This includes the ability to linkoffline data (CRM and other first-, second-, and third-party) and online data (impressions, clicks, conversions) to help marketers betterunderstand purchase intent, relevant messaging, and focus on targeting those ready to convert.Predictive Analytics: A way to truly drive insights out of the ‚big data‛ advertisers have collected in their DMP. They need to be able toanswer questions like:Is the data I have good or bad?How much data is there and which data should I care about?How does my data overlay on various inventory sources?How does my data intersect with campaigns?Are the ‚males‛ I am targeting also the ‚females‛?How much duplication do I have in my media buys?What do right prospects look like? How do I find more of them?Attribution Modeling. A way to truly keep score across the entire marketing funnel not just the last touch before a customer buys.Understanding how brand advertising in the upper portion of the funnel effects performance at the bottom portion of the funnel is essential inhelping determine who are your best partners both for brand and direct response advertising. The interplay between each is essential tovaluing the money spent.In my mind, when looking to choose a DMP vendor there are three things to consider:Technology Stack: Is the solution you are looking at a standalone solution? Is this all they do or is this an ‚add on‛ to what they do day in andday out? Was the solution built in such a way that it can scale with you and your business over time?Neutral Platform and Integration Layer: Can the solution assemble all your media and audience data to provide a pure cross-channel view ofyour entire media spend? Can the provider get access to and handle the implementation to ensure you are integrating all of your siloedsolutions and are capturing the right information from day one to take action?Predictive Analytics: Wouldn’t it be great to know what would happen ahead of time if you moved your media buy from one inventory providerto another or if you targeted one specific audience versus another? The ability to do ‚what if‛ analysis across your entire media budget is coreto reducing the inefficiencies that exist in all media plans. In order to find those inefficiencies and decide where to reinvest you need to beable to leverage first/second/third party data to ensure your audience and media are aligned.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 21What many companies do not realize is the value in a DMP partner comes when the partner has the ability to get access to all their consumertouch points and enables them to see cross-channel/inventory provider and drive actionable insights from the data. If you only get insightsinto audiences bought from one specific data partner or only get analytics on your buys from one particular data/media partner you will not beable to deliver the holistic insights to reduce inefficiencies, increase reach, and drive new sales.The bottom line: It is the intelligence layer that goes with a DMP that will take marketers from just investing in digital media to leveraging digitalmedia to effectively drive brand awareness, retargeting efforts, website efficiency, and conversions. Any one feature set falls short withoutthe other two.A nova mídia digital é simplesCristiano Nobrega, sócio-fundador da TailTarget, analisa o atual momento do mercado digital e sua complexidadePor Cristiano NobregaSócio-fundador da TailTargetHá alguns dias ouvi a seguinte frase: "contratei uma TD que comprará mídia display por RTB, através de uma DSP conectada a todas asprincipais AdExs e vamos qualificar a compra da mídia através dos perfis de uma DMP que adotamos". Para um leigo, essa frase pode soarcomo algo indecifrável, contudo, essa é a nova realidade da nossa atividade e demonstra a exata dimensão de que o mercado de mídia digitaljá está repleto de siglas, aparentemente bastante complexas para todos nós.Então, como nos preparamos para participar desta nova realidade? A resposta é paradoxalmente simples e óbvia: entendendo quem são osprincipais agentes dessa nova cadeia de valor e decodificando seus significados de forma objetiva. Transformações como essa, pela qual amídia digital está passando, dependem da adoção sistemática das novas práticas e plataformas por parte dos agentes de mercado, sejamanunciantes, agências ou publishers. A meu ver a complexidade causada por essas novas siglas é muito maior do que deveria, o que contribuipara inibir que parte ainda significativa do mercado entenda e sinta-se mais confortável em fazer negócio nesse novo ambiente.Decifrando esse novo ecossistema, já é possível comprar no Brasil audiências online através de lances programados em tempo real com baseem diversas especificações que asseguram o melhor valor pago para se atingir o público-alvo correto. É a chamada prática de Real TimeBidding, ou RTB. Essas compras sistemáticas são feitas através de plataformas criadas para gerenciar esse tipo de demanda por mídia, aschamadas DemandSidePlatforms, ou DSPs. Elas são operadas por Trading Desks (TDs), empresas ou áreas especializadas nesse novo jeito decomprar mídia digital. Já as Ad Exchanges (AdExs) são plataformas intermediárias que disponibilizam a audiência dos websites para que essaforma de transação ocorra.E para que o público impactado numa campanha programada dessa maneira tenha o perfil desejado pelo anunciante, entra em cena um recursofundamental, a DMP (Data Management Platform). Esse tipo de plataforma processa incontáveis volumes de dados (big data) provenientes danavegação dos internautas e de suas interações online com a marca do anunciante, a fim de padronizar e qualificar o perfil da audiência. Issocria inteligência para o negócio e permite que o lance de compra oferecido encontre, não importa onde, um perfil de público inequivocamentedesejado sem dispersão, otimizando os investimentos publicitários.Portanto os pilares dessa nova forma de operar a mídia digital continuam sendo os mesmos de sempre: de um lado a audiência dos websitesou publishers (oferta), do outro os anunciantes e agências (demanda), passando pelos dados de qualificação da audiência (segmentação). Afinalo que muda na prática é a intensidade com que os dados e a tecnologia são aplicados para tornar a publicidade online muito mais dinâmica,precisa e, claro, simples.What Happened When One Man Pinged the Whole InternetA home science experiment that probed billions of Internet devices reveals that thousands of industrial and business systems offer remoteaccess to anyone.Call response: The approximate location of some of the 460 million responses to a survey of Internet devices carried out by an anonymoushacker.By Tom Simonite on April 26, 2013
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 22Why It MattersMany company’s IT systems have largely unknown and easily hackable backdoors.You probably haven’t heard of HD Moore, but up to a few weeks ago every Internet device in the world, perhaps including some in your ownhome, was contacted roughly three times a day by a stack of computers that sit overheating his spare room. ‚I have a lot of cooling equipmentto make sure my house doesn’t catch on fire,‛ says Moore, who leads research at computer security company Rapid7. In February last year hedecided to carry out a personal census of every device on the Internet as a hobby. ‚This is not my day job; it’s what I do for fun,‛ he says.Moore has now put that fun on hold. ‚[It] drew quite a lot of complaints, hate mail, and calls from law enforcement,‛ he says. But the datacollected has revealed some serious security problems, and exposed some vulnerable business and industrial systems of a kind used to controleverything from traffic lights to power infrastructure.Moore’s census involved regularly sending simple, automated messages to each one of the 3.7 billion IP addresses assigned to devicesconnected to the Internet around the world (Google, in contrast, collects information offered publicly by websites). Many of the two terabytes(2,000 gigabytes) worth of replies Moore received from 310 million IPs indicated that they came from devices vulnerable to well-known flaws,or configured in a way that could to let anyone take control of them.On Tuesday, Moore published results on a particularly troubling segment of those vulnerable devices: ones that appear to be used for businessand industrial systems. Over 114,000 of those control connections were logged as being on the Internet with known security flaws. Many couldbe accessed using default passwords and 13,000 offered direct access through a command prompt without a password at all.Those vulnerable accounts offer attackers significant opportunities, says Moore, including rebooting company servers and IT systems,accessing medical device logs and customer data, and even gaining access to industrial control systems at factories or power infrastructure.Moore’s latest findings were aided by a similar dataset published by an anonymous hacker last month, gathered by compromising 420,000pieces of network hardware.The connections Moore was looking for are known as serial servers, used to connect devices to the Internet that don’t have that functionalitybuilt in. ‚Serial servers act as glue between archaic systems and the networked world,‛ says Moore. ‚[They] are exposing many organizationsto attack.‛ Moore doesn’t know whether the flaws he has discovered are being exploited yet, but has released details on how companies canscan their systems for the problems he uncovered.Joel Young, chief technology officer of Digi International, manufacturer of many of the unsecured serial servers that Moore found, welcomedthe research, saying it had helped his company understand how people were using its products. ‚Some customers that buy and deploy ourproducts didn’t follow good security policy or practices,‛ says Young. ‚We have to do more proactive education for customers about security.‛Young says his company sells a cloud service that can give its products a private, secured connection away from the public Internet. However,he also said that Digi would continue to ship products with default passwords, because it made initial setup smoother, and that makescustomers more likely to set their own passwords. ‚I haven’t found a better way,‛ he says.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 23Billy Rios, a security researcher who works on industrial control systems at security startup company Cylance, says Moore’s project providesvaluable numbers to quantify the scale of a problem that is well-known to experts like himself but underappreciated by companies at risk.Rios says that in his experience, systems used by more ‚critical‛ facilities such as energy infrastructure are just as likely to be vulnerable toattack as those used for jobs such as controlling doors in a small office. ‚They are using the same systems,‛ he says.Removing serial servers from the public Internet so that they are accessed through a private connection could prevent many of the easiestattacks, says Rios, but attackers could still use various techniques to steal the necessary credentials.The new work adds to other significant findings from Moore’s unusual hobby. Results he published in January showed that around 50 millionprinters, games consoles, routers, and networked storage drives are connected to the Internet and easily compromised due to known flaws in aprotocol called Universal Plug and Play (UPnP). This protocol allows computers to automatically find printers, but is also built into some securitydevices, broadband routers, and data storage systems, and could be putting valuable data at risk.Data collected by Moore’s survey has also helped Rapid7 colleagues identify how a piece of software called FinFisher was used by lawenforcement and intelligence agencies to spy on political activists. It also helped unmask the control structure for a long-running campaigncalled Red October that infiltrated many government systems in Europe.Moore believes the security industry is overlooking some rather serious, and basic, security problems by focusing mostly on the computersused by company employees. ‚It became obvious to me that we’ve got some much bigger issues,‛ says Moore. ‚There [are] some fundamentalproblems with how we use the Internet today.‛ He wants to get more people working to patch up the backdoors that are putting companies atrisk.However, Moore has no plans to probe the entire Internet again. Large power and Internet bills, and incidents such the Chinese government’sComputer Emergency Response Team asking U.S. authorities to stop Moore ‚hacking all their things‛ have convinced him it’s time to find anew hobby. However, with plenty of data left to analyze, there will likely be more to reveal about the true state of online security, says Moore:‚We’re sitting on mountains of new vulnerabilities.‛Retail executive lays out the future of content curation.Carrie Whitehead, Zappos on April 25, 2013.If you think about it, fashion may actually be THE industry that started the curation trend ” we just didn’t know it at the time. How could we?‚Curation‛ is a relatively new term, but it’s finding its way into other realms; you hear about content curation, music curation ” all meaning thatin some way, these industries are personalizing their offer according to your individual wants, needs and likes.Online retail has given us the ability to find almost anything we’d want to buy. In fact, offering a great selection has become the goal for manyonline retailers. The largest online retailer, Amazon.com has a vision to be the ‘Earth’s Biggest Selection.’ But is this vast selection toooverwhelming for shoppers? A search for ‘black dress’ in Clothing & Accessories on Amazon.com brings back 65,529 results! For consumers,this large number of choices can lead to confusion, exhaustion and dissatisfied purchases, or worse, no purchase at all.With new retailers, designers and online experiences launching daily, the need for easy discovery of relevant fashion is more important thanever. Shoppers are increasingly turning to experiences that offer a smaller set of tailored selections to help find the product that is just rightfor them according to their individual wants, needs and likes. A tailored experience is no longer just a desire for shoppers, it is an expectation.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 24Frank & Oak Style recomendationsCurated retail is nothing new. Traditional brick and mortar stores have always relied on strategic merchandise presentation, attractive windowdisplays and helpful sales associates to grab their customer’s attention and help them discover new products. Although online stores may nothave the advantage of this physical and in-person appeal, they are using consumer data, advanced technologies and social media to take thecurated experience to the next level.Large retailers are looking at how they can offer a more tailored experience around their existing inventory. Zappos recently launched Glance, ashopping experience allowing users to discover the most exciting products from Zappos through curated collections. In addition to hand-pickedcollections, Glance allows users to heart products they love; ultimately allowing shoppers to discover products hearted by others with similartaste or by what is popular within the community.Retailers are also turning to a limited product mix to offer a more tailored experience. Niche retailers such as Warby Parker (retro-inspiredeyewear) and Frank & Oak (quality menswear) are providing a boutique experience with a price tag that’s accessible.Many websites focus on narrowed discovery by offering products chosen by celebrities, industry experts or the social community. Socialshopping site OpenSky taps celebrities and influencers to select the products they love. Fancy, a social photo site similar to Pinterest, putscuration in the hands of the community. Its goal is to connect users with similar tastes and allow them to purchase the things they like.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 25All of the examples above help shoppers discover products that are more relevant to them. Additionally, because these experiences are handtailored ” in some cases by someone the shopper knows ” they are more likely to purchase the product or share with their friends.Although there will always be a need for the multi-category mass retail experience, curated online shopping is a huge trend that will continue tohelp consumers navigate the incredible selection to find what’s right for them. As online shopping behavior changes, retailers will continue tofind ways to provide easy-to-use, highly personalized experiences that offer customers what they want, where they want it. Combining anonline shopper’s history and preferences with human touch will lead to the perfect answer to the question, ‚What is right for me?‛Carrie Whitehead is the Product and UX Manager at Zappos Labs in San Francisco, where she spearheads new and innovative adventures inonline shopping.Six Current and Six Rapidly Expanding Trends Marketers Should FocusOnPosted on April 25, 2013Image(Originally delivered at the Publicis Investor Conference in London on April 23, 2013)It is clear to everyone today that six forces are driving the future. These are that the world is, and it will become morea) Digitalb) Networked and connectedc) Mobile
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 26d) Social ( we live in a people network age)e) Driven by emerging marketsf) People powered as tech democratizes everything and empowers peopleNow we are anticipating six key drivers of the future that build on the original six trends. And we are building our future strategy around thesesix new realities.1. The future is not just increasingly digital but it is integrating with analog (Digital Leakage)Mobile phones make place and people important. E commerce and regular commerce blend. Amazon has stores and Walmart goes digital.Alibaba in China is spans real world and digital world. People remain filled with analog feelings in a digital world. All this places a premium onthose who can combine TQ (Tech Q), IQ and EQ (Emotion Quotient). Brands and stories will matter greatly since in the end its about people and‚we tell each other stories in order to live‛ (Joan Didion) and ‚we choose with our hearts and use numbers to justify what we just did‛ (BlaisePascal).2 .The future is less about marketing and more about facilitating self marketingPeople use search and social, to learn and speak to each other about products and services. They self market using people’s networks likeFacebook, blogs, Twitter, Yelp and much more. Clients must ensure that their Brands are easily accessible, responsive and broadly distributedin this world. Are you facilitating self marketing. In a transparent world authenticity is what matters. How can brands remain relevant andauthentic?3. Advertising will be less about messages and more about content curation, creation and distribution, and increasingly about utilities andservices.Acts not just ads will be key. Brands increasingly will develop digital products and services such as Amex open forum and Nike Fuel Band.Mobility, Participation and API’s (Application Protocol Interfaces) will allow new ways to tell stories, engage and deliver value to consumers.Experiences will rule.4.The future of TV will be even more but powerful will be very different and come from the slime (IP TV) and be multi-glass.Look at Amazon, You Tube, Netflix, Twitter (and their global equivalents) for where TV is going. Look at the app ecosystem that consumersare getting used to on their phones and tablets as a new way to engage with TV’s. Look at the 13 to 18 year olds who watch more Internet TVthan broadcast TV to see future behaviors. A world of on demand, multi glass (screens, devices like Google Glass and new wearablecomputing) , and full seasons released at one time. Glass will not just be connected to each other and to IP networks but to many of ourdevices like cars!5. The future will be about more access and less ownershipConsumers increasingly want access to content (Spotify, Netflix etc.) or things (Zip car etc.) rather than just ownership. This will also be true inthe world of big data. It will be how to access and combine rather than own the right data in real time to help deliver services and predictcustomer behavior. Finally. marketers will want to be both accessible and look to partners who can provide them with access to globalpartnerships and opportunities key6.Marketing a huge growth categoryThis is a growth game and not a share game as empowered consumers call for empowered marketing. To grow in a networked worldcollaboration and friends rather than ‚frenemies‛ (you are or you are not pregnant…odd this ‚frenemy‛ thing)The future world will not only make marketing more effective but will make brand-building story telling more compelling and to prepare for thishuge growth we are aligning behind three pillars of a) Commerce+, where marketing is commerce and commerce is marketing, b) NextGeneration Story Telling which leverage mobility, participation and API’s and c) Content (Creation, distribution and measurement across glasswhich in some cases will be screens, in some cases will be glasses like Google Glass, and in some cases will be devices like new iWatches) .The future of marketing will be bright. Now all of us marketers have to be bright enough in learning, re-inventing and collaborating to remainrelevant and truly unleash this potential!Ideas and insights from our laboratory of strategy architects,identity shapers, design gurus, web mavens, content experts andsocial media wizards...we invite you to join our conversation.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 27Simple Ways to Achieve a Brainstorming BreakthroughDesign, General | Adam Hansen | 04/23/13mmblog_brainstormAlthough brainstorming is an essential process, it’s not always an easy one. Snatching ultra-creative concepts out of thin air takes a uniqueapproach and mindset. At MM, we’re constantly kicking our brainstorming sessions into high gear to produce great work for our clients. We’dlove to share some of our favorite brainstorming techniques that will help you think outside of the box, while giving your productivity a rocket-like boost.Remember while brainstorming that there are no bad ideas. We repeat: there are no bad ideas. This is an old adage for good reason.Brainstorming should be used to get every last idea out of your brain and into the world„ all ideas should be welcomed and accepted,regardless of how wonky they may be. In a group, picking apart someone’s suggestions can quickly shut down creativity and stall the process.That’s not what brainstorming is all about.At MM we strive to create an open environment where no one is afraid to contribute and everyone is heard. Even if you think an idea is crazy,throw it out there. It often kickstarts someone else’s thought process or evolves into a viable concept later on.While brainstorming, surround yourself with items that will facilitate the process. A whiteboard is a great visual tool to collect all of your ideas,concepts, and drawings down in one place. It’s also an asset later when you start to pare down ideas and explore more specific possibilities.It never hurts to have something to doodle on while you think. Sometimes ideas manifest themselves visually, and a quick sketch will explainthe concept in a way that words can’t. Doodling allows your mind to wander and work on ideas subconsciously. If you’re not a doodler, usesomething else while brainstorming to help put your mind to work„here at the lab, our weapons of choice are Play-Doh and sketching tables.If you get stuck, call on other brainstorming exercises to get back on track. Word association is a great way to revitalize an idea session.Write down a few different words that can be associated with your project’s theme and branch off from them. The same could be done with animage„pick a photo or graphic and describe it. You might be surprised at how often these new descriptors can be readily applied to your ownideas.You could also jump-start idea generation by playing a game. Apples to Apples is a great example. It features cards with many words andphrases that you can apply to your work. It may result in some interesting ideas that wouldn’t otherwise come up. The electronic gameCatchphrase, is another way to get your brain out of the mundane muck of monotonous thinking.Don’t hesitate to step aside and take a break if your brain just isn’t functioning. As mentioned earlier, you work on problems subconsciously.You often produce better results absentmindedly as opposed to forcing yourself to plug away. Go get some food or grab a coffee. Working ona different project or in a new location is another great way to gain new perspective and inspiration.Introducing the New LinkedIn Contacts: A Smarter Way to Stay in TouchSachin Rekhi, April 25, 2013Have you ever wished for a personal assistant who reminds you when your colleagues are celebrating new jobs or birthdays? Or have youwanted to quickly pull up the last conversations you had with people before you head out to meet them?Today we’re proud to announce the launch of LinkedIn Contacts, a smarter way to stay in touch with your most important relationships. Withthis new product, we bring all your contacts from your address books, email accounts, and calendars together with the power of your LinkedInnetwork. Contacts is available both on LinkedIn.com as well as a brand new app for iPhone. Over the coming weeks, we’ll start sendinginvitations to try LinkedIn Contacts to a limited number of members in the United States.With the new LinkedIn Contacts experience, we’ve introduced features in three areas:Bring all your contacts to one placeLinkedIn Contacts brings together all your address books, emails, and calendars, and keeps them up to date in one place. From these sources,we’ll automatically pull in the details of your past conversations and meetings, and bring these details directly onto your contact’s profile.Never miss an opportunity to say helloGet alerted on job changes and birthdays in your network, a perfect opportunity to stay in touch. Also, you can set reminders and add notesabout the important people in your life.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 28Take it on your mobile deviceStay connected on the go. LinkedIn Contacts is available as a standalone app for iPhone, so you can stay in touch with your contacts whereveryou work.If you’d like to learn more or be one of the first to check out this new experience, visit http://contacts.linkedin.com to join our waitlist.Coke Runs First All-Digital Effort, Focusing on Teens and MobileBeverage giant debuts multi-year initiativeBy Christopher HeineApril 23, 2013, 1:48 PM EDTTechnologyCoca-Cola has emerged from an extensive round of teen panels and believes it knows what those kids want from the brand„fun, "snackable"digital experiences that center on mobile consumption over desktops. The beverage firm today unveiled "The AHH Effect" initiative with agencypartner Wieden + Kennedy that will eventually include dozens of digital games and other content based on their recent research.Pio Schunker, svp of integrated marketing communications at Coca-Cola North America, put the effort into historical perspective for the brandthis morning during an online presentation. "Very importantly, this is going to mark the first all-digital campaign by Coca-Cola," he said. "Andcritically, this signals a whole new way in which weve decided to create marketing content."Schunker added: "Mobile phones are [teens] lifelines. Its not that they dont watch TV. But mobile is their first screen."Seventeen digital experiences, such as games called "Ice Toss" and "Guide the Bubble," are live today via dedicated sites that involve imagesthat could be described as interesting if not random or even kaleidoscopic. To be clear, while Coke believes most of the activity will happen onsmartphones and tablets, the effort can be accessed from desktops. A digital media push involving 19 teen-friendly media partners like Alloy,Vevo, Buzzfeed, Facebook and Twitter will be in the offing, while a 15-second video teaser went live this morning.Whats more, Coke marketers envision this content-based strategy to be long term. "The goal is for this to be a multi-year campaign,"Schunker said.In the coming weeks, Coke will utilize paid and owned media via Facebook and Twitter to encourage teens to create their own software-basedexperiences for the brand. Out of the submissions, 25 will be selected to be included in "The AHH Effect" run. Eventually, there will be 61 suchexperiences with a dedicated AHH.com destination„each new addition will add an "H" to the URL. So yes, the 12th experience will have a URLentailing a dozen Hs.Schunker explained, "We will be refreshing these 61 experiences and optimizing them throughout the year as well as in the future in a way thatwe hope will continuously tap into a teens desire for discovery, constant stimulation, novelty as well as recognition."
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 29Twice a week, the brand will analyze the content while switching out mediocre performers for more-promising items. The content will bemodeled from a mobile-first perspective and attempt to appeal to modern teens famously short attention spans. To hear Schunker describe it,Coke is setting up a content lab focusing on teens and mobile."This is meant to be a constantly iterating campaign," he said. "We fully expect to end up in a completely different place compared to where westarted."Lastly, the campaign does have one small offline element. Beginning in May, Cokes 16- and 20-ounce products will feature "AHH" moments todrive fans to the AHH.com URLs.Agency briefs must improveNEW YORK: Marketers need to improve the briefs they produce in order to get better work from their agencies, according to a new industrysurvey.Joanne Davis Consulting in New York gathered replies from 293 agency leaders around the world, asking them to rank clients on variousissues, including integration, procurement, compensation and agency consolidation.Assignment briefs, reported Advertising Age, were consistently highlighted as an area for improvement, with most agencies expressing adegree of frustration about their quality, and none able to report that briefs were always complete and focused.Some 53% of agencies said their briefs were complete but lacking in focus, and a further 27% found them incomplete and inconsistent. Just20% said briefs were complete and focused most of the time.One reason for this may be a dearth of strategic thinking in the marketing community, with a majority of agencies believing that clients abilitiesin this regard are at best "adequate" if not "limited". Only 3% rated their clients as excellent in this field.Few agencies, however, were beyond improvement on their own side. When asked how they could better meet clients needs, just 10% said nomajor changes were planned.But a quarter felt they needed more diversified expertise, while 34% wanted more diversified expertise and technology. In all, 31% said theyneeded more diversified expertise, technology and training.The findings of the survey echo a presentation given at Warcs recent Measuring Advertising Performance event. Jeremy Caplin of Aprais toldthe audience that good clients get great work from their agencies while poor ones do not.Caplin claimed that creative output from an agency is 37% better from the bottom to the top 10% of clients.Like Joanne Davis Consulting, he identified the quality of briefing as an area that was vital in the make-up of a good client. Others included theapproval process, timing and behaviour.Data sourced from Advertising Age; additional content by Warc staff , 26 April 2013Read more at http://www.warc.com/LatestNews/News/EmailNews.news?ID=31319&Origin=WARCNewsEmail#U06HjWqXKABt48mm.99Excerpted from BIG DATA: A Revolution That Will Transform How WeLive, Work, and Think by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Kenneth Cukier.Computer systems currently base their decisions on rules they have been explicitly programmed to follow. Thus when a decision goes awry, asis inevitable from time to time, we can go back and figure out why the computer made it. For example, we can investigate questions like ‚Whydid the autopilot system pitch the plane five degrees higher when an external sensor detected a sudden surge in humidity?‛ Today’s computercode can be opened and inspected, and those who know how to interpret it can trace and comprehend the basis for its decisions, no matterhow complex.With big-data analysis, however, this traceability will become much harder. The basis of an algorithm’s predictions may often be far toointricate for the average human to understand.When computers were explicitly programmed to follow sets of instructions, as with IBM’s early translation program of Russian to English in1954, a human could readily grasp why the software substituted one word for another. But Google Translate incorporates billions of pages of
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 30translations into its judgments about whether the English word ‚light‛ should be ‚lumière‛ or ‚léger‛ in French (that is, whether the word refersto brightness or to weight). It’s impossible for a human to trace the precise reasons for the program’s word choices because they are based onmassive amounts of data and vast statistical computations.Big data operates at a scale that transcends our ordinary understanding. For example, the correlation Google identified between a handful ofsearch terms and the flu was the result of testing 450 million mathematical models. In contrast, Cynthia Rudin initially designed 106 predictorsfor whether a manhole might catch fire, and she could explain to Con Edison’s managers why her program prioritized inspection sites as it did.‚Explainability,‛ as it is called in artificial intelligence circles, is important for us mortals, who tend to want to know why, not just what. But whatif instead of 106 predictors, the system automatically generated a whopping 601 predictors, the vast majority of which had very low weightingsbut which, when taken together, improved the model’s accuracy? The basis for any prediction might be staggeringly complex. What could shetell the managers then to convince them to reallocate their limited budget?In these scenarios, we can see the risk that big-data predictions, and the algorithms and datasets behind them, will become black boxes thatoffer us no accountability, traceability, or confidence. To prevent this, big data will require monitoring and transparency, which in turn willrequire new types of expertise and institutions. These new players will provide support in areas where society needs to scrutinize big-datapredictions and enable people who feel wronged by them to seek redress.As a society, we’ve often seen such new entities emerge when a dramatic increase in the complexity and specialization of a particular fieldproduced an urgent need for experts to manage the new techniques. Professions like law, medicine, accounting, and engineering underwent thisvery transformation more than a century ago. More recently, specialists in computer security and privacy have cropped up to certify thatcompanies are complying with the best practices determined by bodies like the International Organization for Standards (which was itselfformed to address a new need for guidelines in this field).Big data will require a new group of people to take on this role. Perhaps they will be called ‚algorithmists.‛ They could take two forms„independent entities to monitor firms from outside, and employees or departments to monitor them from within„just as companies have in-house accountants as well as outside auditors who review their finances.The rise of the algorithmistThese new professionals would be experts in the areas of computer science, mathematics, and statistics; they would act as reviewers of big-data analyses and predictions. Algorithmists would take a vow of impartiality and confidentiality, much as accountants and certain otherprofessionals do now. They would evaluate the selection of data sources, the choice of analytical and predictive tools, including algorithms andmodels, and the interpretation of results. In the event of a dispute, they would have access to the algorithms, statistical approaches, anddatasets that produced a given decision.Had there been an algorithmist on staff at the Department of Homeland Security in 2004, he might have prevented the agency from generatinga no-fly list so flawed that it included Senator Kennedy. More recent instances where algorithmists could have played a role, have happened inJapan, France, Germany, and Italy, where people have complained that Google’s ‚autocomplete‛ feature, which produces a list of commonsearch terms associated with a typed-in name, has defamed them. The list is largely based on the frequency of previous searches: terms areranked by their mathematical probability. Still, which of us wouldn’t be angry if the word ‚convict‛ or ‚prostitute‛ appeared next to our namewhen potential business or romantic partners turned to the Web to check us out?We envision algorithmists as providing a market-oriented approach to problems like these that may head off more intrusive forms ofregulation. They’d fill a need similar to the one accountants and auditors filled when they emerged in the early twentieth century to handle thenew deluge of financial information. The numeric onslaught was hard for people to understand; it required specialists organized in an agile, self-regulatory way. The market responded by giving rise to a new sector of competitive firms specializing in financial surveillance. By offering thisservice, the new breed of professionals bolstered society’s confidence in the economy. Big data could and should benefit from the similarconfidence boost that algorithmists would provide.External algorithmistsWe envision external algorithmists to act as impartial auditors to review the accuracy or validity of big-data predictions whenever thegovernment required it, such as under court order or regulation. They also can take on big-data companies as clients, performing audits forfirms that wanted expert support. And they may certify the soundness of big-data applications like anti-fraud techniques or stock-tradingsystems. Finally, external algorithmists are prepared to consult with government agencies on how best to use big data in the public sector.As in medicine, law, and other occupations, we envision that this new profession regulates itself with a code of conduct. The algorithmists’impartiality, confidentiality, competence, and professionalism is enforced by tough liability rules; if they failed to adhere to these standards,they’d be open to lawsuits. They can also be called on to serve as expert witnesses in trials, or to act as ‚court masters‛, which are expertsappointed by judges to assist them in technical matters on particularly complex cases.Moreover, people who believe they’ve been harmed by big-data predictions„a patient rejected for surgery, an inmate denied parole, a loanapplicant denied a mortgage„can look to algorithmists much as they already look to lawyers for help in understanding and appealing thosedecisions.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 31Internal algorithmistsInternal algorithmists work inside an organization to monitor its big-data activities. They look out not just for the company’s interests but alsofor the interests of people who are affected by its big-data analyses. They oversee big-data operations, and they’re the first point of contactfor anybody who feels harmed by their organization’s big-data predictions. They also vet big-data analyses for integrity and accuracy beforeletting them go live. To perform the first of these two roles, algorithmists must have a certain level of freedom and impartiality within theorganization they work for.The notion of a person who works for a company remaining impartial about its operations may seem counterintuitive, but such situations areactually fairly common. The surveillance divisions at major financial institutions are one example; so are the boards of directors at many firms,whose responsibility is to shareholders, not management. And many media companies, including the New York Times and the Washington Post,employ ombudsmen whose primary responsibility is to defend the public trust. These employees handle readers’ complaints and often chastisetheir employer publicly when they determine that it has done wrong.And there’s an even closer analogue to the internal algorithmist„a professional charged with ensuring that personal information isn’t misusedin the corporate setting. For instance, Germany requires companies above a certain size (generally ten or more people employed in processingpersonal information) to designate a data-protection representative. Since the 1970s, these in-house representatives have developed aprofessional ethic and an esprit de corps. They meet regularly to share best practices and training and have their own specialized media andconferences. Moreover, they’ve succeeded in maintaining dual allegiances to their employers and to their duties as impartial reviewers,managing to act as data-protection ombudsmen while also embedding information-privacy values throughout their companies’ operations. Webelieve in-house algorithmists could do the same.Opening the black boxThere are no foolproof ways to fully prepare for the world of big data; it will require that we establish new principles by which we governourselves. A series of important changes to our practices can help society as it becomes more familiar with big data’s character andshortcomings. We must design safeguards to allow a new professional class of ‚algorithmists‛ to assess big-data analytics „ so that a worldwhich has become less random by dint of big data does not turn into a black box, simply replacing one form of the unknowable with another.Copyright © 2013 by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier. Reprinted with permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt PublishingCompany. All rights reserved.Despite Reservations, Programmatic Buying Gains SteamBuyers and publishers struggle to get the info and control they need out of exchangesProgrammatic buying has begun to rewrite the way digital ads are bought and sold. Through demand-side platforms and real-time biddingexchanges, marketers are purchasing ad inventory through automated technology, which can allow for real-time response to customeractions„often at a lower cost than traditional ad-buying methods. However, both publishers and media buyers still have concerns aboutprogrammatic buying.Digiday and digital advertising technology provider OpenX surveyed media buyers and publishers in North America in February 2013 and foundthat 70% were already doing some programmatic trading. And 77% of those buying via programmatic means planned to do more of it in thenext 12 months.Not only are more media buyers using programmatic exchanges, but a good number are also considering moving to programmatic trading toreplace their direct relationships with publishers. More than one-third of media buyers said they were at least somewhat likely to do so. Andanother one-third seemed willing to entertain replacing their direct relationship with publishers with programmatic buying, but they wanted tosee the success of the method first. Only three out of 10 media buyers seemed certain they would not move entirely to programmatic buying.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 32For publishers, the concern around programmatic buying is a matter of protecting their pricing and brand image. Three-quarters of publisherssurveyed said that their biggest issue with programmatic trading was controlling cost per thousand impressions (CPM) and pricing. Additionally,publishers want to protect their relationships with media buyers; maintaining a direct relationship with buyers was a concern for over two-thirdsof publishers. Maintaining control over ad quality, and by extension, protecting the publisher brand itself, also ranked as a leading concern.When asked what part of the ad-sales process could be automated, publishers ranked reviewing an ad’s quality last. Only one-quarter thoughtthis aspect of ad sales could be automated, reiterating the importance publishers place on being able to review what goes alongside theircontent.While the cheaper pricing and better targeting upside of programmatic buying may be obvious for media buyers, they too have concerns aboutmigrating onto programmatic platforms. The greatest percentage (68%) wanted more data to inform bids. There was also significant interest inexposure to additional inventory.In terms of what features publishers look for when choosing an ad server to use for their programmatic trading operations, yield optimizationwas most important to publishers, at 88%. Eight out of 10 also wanted to be able to set price floors based on which buyer or segment wasmaking a purchase„a preference borne out of anxiety about losing pricing control.Read more at http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Despite-Reservations-Programmatic-Buying-Gains-Steam/1009833#opuPjvdSKtXSYclS.99Interesting Ways Businesses Use Big Data to Improve PersonalizationAdria Saracino | April 23, 2013
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 33Big data has careened onto the scene in a major way, promising huge rewards: McKinsey Global Institute estimates that employing big dataknowledge could net the U.S. healthcare system somewhere in the neighborhood of $300 billion in value on an annual basis. By the sameestimate, industries that rely on personal location data (such as cellphone triangulation information) can expect to see consumer surplus rise tothe tune of $600 billion when they look to big data for results.Consider for a moment both the enormous scale of these estimates and IBMs claim that nearly 90 percent of the worlds data has beencreated in the last two years, and at least one thing is clear: big data is huge. Given the enormity of the data sets that comprise the field andthe logistical (and sometimes touchy) issues that accompany its use, is it any wonder that big data has come to be regarded as a resourcebest utilized by only the largest companies, the Googles and Microsofts of the world?It is no secret that these big data pros are whizzes at utilizing big data results to create opportunities. However, smaller businesses miss anopportunity to experience their own share of success in this emerging field when they decide that big data is too big for them to tackle. Hereswhy this constitutes a missed opportunity:Using Big Data Results to Improve PersonalizationOne of the great ironies of big data is that it can be used to make commerce experiences feel smaller and more intimate to customers. This, inturn, may positively impact purchasing experiences and deepen customer relationships and brand loyalty. Mining the treasure trove that is bigdata has tremendous potential for smaller companies to improve customer experience through personalization.Consider for a moment Amazons personalization strategy, which many consider to be the go-to example of personalization strategies thatwork. As you are no doubt aware, Amazon relies on wish lists, browsing histories, and purchasing history to create individualized productsuggestions. "The worlds largest marketplace" feels smaller when the online store remembers your name, and that the last time you wereshopping you were in the market for leather gardening gloves (size medium, please).Here we take a look at several of the most interesting (and effective) strategies that organizations (businesses and government organizationsalike) employ to improve personalization:Improve User Experience With Personalized Ads, Products, and ServicesAnaconda Sports, a successful sporting goods retailer, found itself stuck with an inefficient and costly e-commerce platform that had a lot ofissues:It could not store customer information, which meant that customers had to reenter information each time they visited the site.Their platform didnt provide a unique experience for their customers based on that customers individual preferences and buying history.Customers who had questions about an orders status had to call customer service rather than looking the status up online.In order to remain relevant in todays competitive online retail market, Anaconda knew that it needed to make a change (as cited in the abovecase study).The solution came to the retailer in the form of Amazons Webstore. Previously, the company was providing even repeat customers with aclunky and anonymous online buying experience. Opening an Amazon Webstore (which is an independent store outside of Amazon.com) allowedAnaconda to develop the type of efficient online store it needed.Perhaps most importantly, Anaconda can now place Amazon Product Ads, which target sports shoppers searching Amazon.com. However,when someone clicks on an Anaconda ad on Amazon.com, they are taken directly to the Anaconda Webstore. In doing this, Anaconda is able touse Amazons big data by targeting customers searching specifically for sports gear, while still maintaining its identity as a small online store.As reported in the above case study, since making the move to the much more personalized Amazon Webstore, Anaconda is experiencing ahigher ROI. It reports that the conversion rate from Amazon Product Ads is three times higher than the conversion rates from other onlineadvertising streams that they use. Director of e-commerce at Anaconda, Rob Meyer, reports that the company is "reaching more shoppers,generating more revenue at a lower cost-per-click, and earning a much higher ROI."In the long run, this is huge for small businesses, as it puts the big data from corporations like Amazon at their disposal. The overwhelmingamount of Amazons big data isnt a problem here either, because Anaconda is able to tap into only the niche market it needs: sports gearconsumers. In a situation like this, small businesses are able to maintain the best of both worlds: big data from big corporations and a smallbusiness feel.Crowdsourcing Leads to Smart Business DecisionsModCloth began as a small fashion venture in an even smaller dorm room. Since then, the company has expanded - seriously, seriouslyexpanded. The online clothing retailer, which is known for its eclectic vintage and indie fashion, currently attracts over five million unique
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 34viewers each month. However, even though it is one of the fastest growing online clothing retailers, the shopping experience it provides feelsanything but anonymous. And thats the whole point.While ModCloths selection of trendy and unique womens clothes certainly has buyers impressed, it is the companys innovativepersonalization strategies that turn heads in the marketing world. ModCloths brand of personalization relies on involving its loyal customers atnearly every level of the company through crowdsourcing strategies that get customers talking, both to one another and to the company.At its core, ModCloths personalization strategy is to knock out the barriers between customer and company, thereby creating an intimateonline retailing experience. Take, for example, the "Be the Buyer" program, which asks shoppers to vote on a given product and decide if theywould "pick it or skip it." Items with high pick rates are tagged as "Be the Buyer Picks."Not only is this an innovative and fun way to introduce visitors to new items, but it also yields mountains of valuable information (an average of6,786 customers vote in each "Be the Buyer" poll) about buyer preferences and helps the company make valuable predictions about what willsell and what should be cut. If everyone is suddenly "skipping" all of the peplum products, thats information that ModCloth wants to know andact on, before it is stuck with mounds of peplum dresses languishing in the warehouse.ModCloth is a great example of a company that has integrated the collection of big data into its marketing strategy seamlessly. Big data ispart and parcel of what makes the ModCloth buying experience feel unique. The dialogue that develops between brand and customer isvaluable to both parties: ModCloth knows what its customers want and its customers can easily see that their input informs the brandsinventory. Its a win-win.Prediction Leads to ImprovementBig data allowed the struggling school system in Mobile County, Alabama to make some big changes in the way that they reach out to at-riskstudents. Like many struggling school systems, Mobile had a problem with students dropping out of high school at an alarming rate: prior to2011, the dropout rate was 45 percent. This wasnt good for the students and it wasnt good for the community.In order to find a solution to the complex problem of attrition rates in Mobile, the school system looked to big data to tell the story of theirstudents in a unique way (as outlined in this case study). What they found was surprising: when they looked at the data sets they noticeddistinct trends and patterns. For example, they found that suspensions and serial absences frequently preceded a students decision to dropout. This knowledge allowed the school to flag students displaying these risk signs and make sure they made targeted efforts to keep thestudent in school.Using data from across the entire school system, including attendance records, test scores, and disciplinary histories allowed the schoolsystem to gain a unique insight into their students. Looking carefully at the whole student body over time actually allowed the school system tocreate a much more personalized strategy to keep kids in school.And they have some serious results: since beginning their big data experiment, Mobile now has a 70 percent graduation rate, as well asacross-the-board test score improvements.The TakeawayMarketers are always looking for ways to deepen customer loyalty and improve user experience, especially in the face of fierce competition.Big data is perhaps the most important way to create a user experience that treats customers in the way that they want to be treated - likeindividuals. Big data pros have known that data tells a story for a long time, and if you listen properly, your data will tell you vital informationabout your customers and clients.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 35The Rise of the Term Glasshole, Explained by LinguistsRebecca Greenfield 6,702 Views Apr 22, 2013With all the lucky first Google Glass owners now starting to receive their wearable face computers in the mail, we are already seeing a rise inthe "glasshole"„an endearing term used to describe people who do not use the gadgets in socially acceptable ways. Even before there wereso many Glass wearers out in the wild, "glasshole" had started to catch-on beyond the tech-set. After first appearing in TechCrunch in January,it was selected as the Urban Dictionary word of the day in March. Then, just the other day Business Insider sanctioned it as the "new word todescribe inconsiderate Google Glass users." Or, in the words of Bruce Schneier the legendary computer security expert: "Were seeing thebirth of a new epithet, glasshole." But, how did "glasshole" get the honor of representing all the terrible Glass wearing humans out there, whynot glasswipe or glasshat or, something completely different, like Google Jerkbots?"Theres a reason glasshole came first „ its more intuitively obvious," linguist Ben Zimmer told The Atlantic Wire. Asshole is a much morecommon term than asswipe, asshat, or assface. Even as I type, the little red typo line appears under those other terms, but even myspellchecker is familiar with the a-word. Linguist Geoffrey Nunberg chronicled the rise of the term above the rest in his book Ascent of the A-Word. "Within a generation the asshole had become a basic notion of our everyday moral life, replacing older reproaches like phony, lout andheel with a single inclusive moral category," he writes on his site. First used as GI slang during World War II, the term became ubiquitous in justa few decades. "By 1970 it was found across the culture, in country and western songs, the movies of Clint Eastwood and Woody Allen, theplays of Neil Simon, and the essays of Tom Wolfe," writes Nunburg.Asswipe, on the other hand, didnt appear until 1953 in the Saul Bellow novel The Adventures of Augie March. "You little asswipe hoodlum!"wrote Bellow. And it still doesnt quite have the pervasiveness of asshole, despite being the punchline of a Saturday Night Live skit aboutpeople who have it as their unfortunate last name. ("Uh.. listen.. thats Os-wee-pay," Nicholas Cage says at the end of the skit.) Thats perhapsbecause its a wussy version of the word. "The endings -wipe and -hat are just alternate ways of pronouncing asshole when you cant sayit," Nunberg, who teaches at the UC Berkeley School of Information, told the Atlantic Wire. That also explains why glasshole and not glasshattook off. "You can say glasshole without violating the taboo on saying asshole, so why go to -hat or -wipe?" he added. "Why be coy aboutit?" (Nunberg also points out that the same phenomenon happened with devotees of the cultish EST seminars. People used to describe them asestholes„not estwipes.)Further, there is a linguistic reason to choose glasshole: all the glass + ass profanity mixtures are what linguists call satisfying blends becausethey derive from two words whose sounds overlap, as another linguist explained back when we pondered the hatred toward the word "phablet,"which is an unsatisfying blend. All the Glass + wipe, hat, hole, etc work as these blends. But glasshole is more obvious than the others becauseit has been used in other blend combinations before. "Asshole has already generated other similar blends, notably Masshole as an epithet foran inconsiderate Massachusetts driver," Zimmer explained.But, this most recent linguistic phenomenon isnt just about familiarity: Asshole so perfectly encapsulates what it means to be a Glass wearingfreak. The a-hole term denotes a certain inauthenticity, as Nunberg explains in his book:
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 36Inauthenticity is implicit whenever we speak of a sense of entitlement, another phrase that entered the American idiom around the timeasshole did. ... The connection is intrinsic to the idea of the asshole, who imagines that his role or status gives him privileges that aren’t reallyhis to claimGlasshole fits right into that: There is nothing less "authentic" than someone with the cyborg-looking things on their faces. (Trust me, I saw aguy with them sitting outside at a cafe: He looked different in a not-human kind of way.)But even more than that, the glasses bestow "status" and "privileges that arent really to his claim." First of all, the technology is a statussymbol in and of itself, since only a limited number of people "won" the the opportunity to buy the $1,500 devices. The first person to use theterm loosely defined a glasshole as "that know-it-all guy youve always hated, only now hes got 4G and Google+ connected to his face." Inother words, the type of person who would want to wear Glass is a know-it-all„who probably does not know it all„and now he or she hasaccess to the Internet, thus making an otherwise entitled person that much more entitled. In another example, Schneier invoked the term todescribe someone using the glasses to cheat in Scattergories. Glass specifically gave this person "privileges" (ie. a database for cheating) thathe did not deserve.There seems to be another reason, though, that people want to call Glass users a dirty name: the device is designed to allow even more of thekind of online interaction that has already reduced actual human social interaction. Thats why Ryan Lawler employed the term over atTechCrunch earlier this year„he suggested glassholes would watch YouTubes while pretending to have conversations, which would clearly berude. It turns out, however, thats not exactly what has happened. Rather, people just zone out while wearing Glass. Theres even a name for it,as The New York Timess Jenna Wortham explained on her Tumblr. "People in the Valley have coined a term for the weird, half-consciousexpression that Google Glass wearers get on their faces when they are concentrating on doing things with the tiny little screen inside theirglasses," she writes. "They call it glassed out," she continues.That behavior doesnt sound evil or anything. But its potentially rude and mostly just distasteful because having a computer attached to ourfaces differs so much from social norms, as explained here and here. Because of the need to explain the general weirdness that will emergewith the Glass wearing culture, I suspect, the glasshole derivatives, such as glasswipe and glasshat and glassface et. al might start to catch on,too. Plus, writers are going to need synonyms for all the jerks running around with Glass on their heads.Programmatic ad drive works for FordDEARBORN: Ford, the automaker, has extended the scope of its programmatic ad buying beyond digital display formats to encompass onlinevideo, in an indication of the rising importance of this approach.Erica Bigley, Fords digital media manager, told AdExchanger it only recently began purchasing video ads via the programmatic route, but spentfar longer collecting the necessary background information."We have so much robust data that were sitting on. Its taken the past two years of constantly evolving how were looking at that and howwere using it," she said.The company has learned, Bigley continued, the importance of "putting it [video] in the correct data sets hands, and making sure that itscontextually relevant."Programmatic has allowed us to clearly define our swimming lanes," she explained. "Whos going to buy what, to ensure that we are notreaching one consumer 75 times and then missing out on the key consumer we should have been speaking to."Bigley then elaborated on Fords use of data: "In most cases well buy multiple data sets and run them through programmatic buying, so we cantell which one performs better than the other one."The objective of this approach was not necessarily to establish the best data set, but to uncover new insights. For example, "we may havethought our target was women 18 to 34, but actually it looks like men are responding to us more," said Bigley.From there, it was then possible to develop a detailed approach. "Say Message A didnt work against that data set but Message B workedbetter, so obviously this consumer is far more interested in fuel-efficiency messaging over quality messaging," Bigley said."That makes a tremendous difference when you can granularly target your message that way," she continued.For the future, Bigley suggested that major issues included "viewability" and cross-platform metrics, adding: "Eventually, we want to be able todirectly compare how our broadcast is performing compared to how our online video is performing."Thats going to help when we start to segment out our video compared to what we do from a brand perspective, compared to what we dofrom a retail perspective."
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 37Data sourced from AdExchanger; additional content by Warc staff , 23 April 2013Read more at http://www.warc.com/LatestNews/News/EmailNews.news?ID=31301&Origin=WARCNewsEmail#0R3oPuRqbIQYHJWC.99Andrew Keen: Globo foi estúpida e imprudenteFamoso crítico da web 2.0, o escritor britânico dá sua opinião sobre a estratégia do grupo de retirar os links das matérias do Facebook22 de Abril de 2013 “ 16:07+ Andrew Keen, autor do livro O Culto do Amador, conversou com o Meio & MensagemPor Isabella LessaA decisão das Organizações Globo em restringir o uso de uma das principais redes sociais do mundo ressuscitou a longeva batalha entreveículos tradicionais e novas mídias. A estratégia, segundo a empresa, baseou-se em estudo no qual o Facebook figura como o principalmotivo de queda de audiência de suas plataformas digitais.A medida, tomada em 8 de abril, contradiz as estratégias de muitas das grandes empresas de conteúdo mundo afora e foi alvo de críticas dopúblico e de analistas. Entre eles, o britânico Andrew Keen, autor do best-seller O Culto do Amador. Ainda que o historiador e cientista políticoseja conhecido por suas fortes críticas à web 2.0 ” a qual chama de utopia comunista ”, ele reconhece que veículos precisam dialogar com asredes sociais. Confira a seguir sua entrevista e veja a íntegra desta matéria, com opiniões de nomes como Mariela Castro, Nicco Mele e outrosespecialistas, na edição 1556, de 22 de abril, exclusivamente para assinantes, disponível nas versões impressa e para tablets do Meio &Mensagem.MEIO & MENSAGEM ›› Há estratégias que grandes empresas de mídia possam adotar para lucrar por meio da divulgação de conteúdo nasredes sociais?ANDREW KEEN ›› Não, porque as redes sociais são um espaço para a publicidade e as pessoas não pagarão por elas. Os veículos podemanunciar, mas não existe um modelo de negócios para que haja essa forma de monetização.MEIO & MENSAGEM ›› Em 2010, a Reuters proibiu que furos de reportagem fossem publicados no Twitter. Você conhece outros exemplos deempresas que tiveram uma reação parecida?ANDREW KEEN ›› É uma boa questão. Discordo da forma como a mídia pensa que o Google está lucrando (referindo-se à polêmica envolvendojornais e o agregador de notícias da empresa). O The Times, por exemplo, publica manchetes para conseguir aumentar a audiência, mas nãodisponibiliza o conteúdo de graça. Espero que a Reuters tenha mudado de ideia. E aconselho a mídia que não se comporte de forma tãoestúpida.MEIO & MENSAGEM ›› Como você avalia a posição da Globo quanto à estratégia de tirar os links do Facebook?ANDREW KEEN ›› Estúpida e imprudente. O Facebook é um pote de mel, um lugar para atrair views. Inclusive acredito que o Facebook deveriaacordar e cobrar para que as empresas mantenham suas páginas. Quanto à atitude da Globo, sou bastante crítico. O Facebook não é umsubstituto para as mídias tradicionais. Se a empresa publica pequenos teasers nessas mídias, encoraja as pessoas a acessarem o conteúdo, eisso é positivo.MEIO & MENSAGEM ›› Você acredita que outras estratégias digitais, como o paywall, substituem a atuação em redes sociais?ANDREW KEEN ›› Sou totalmente a favor do paywall, por exemplo. No Finacial Times você pode acessar o conteúdo de graça e depois de umtempo se paga. Mas Rupert Murdoch cortou o jornal das mídias sociais (quando instalou seu paywall junto ao The Sun). Tem de haver um mix.Se você ignorar a plataforma digital, estará cometendo suicídio. A solução é usar essas plataformas para colocar manchetes e alavancaraudiência. Isso funciona não só para os jornais, mas para qualquer tipo de negócio. Os jornais devem criar novas estratégias.Leia Mais: http://www.meioemensagem.com.br/home/midia/noticias/2013/04/22/Andrew-Keen-Globo-foi-est-pida-e-imprudente.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=mmbymail-geral&utm_content=Andrew+Keen:+Globo+foi+est%FApida+e+imprudente#ixzz2RI22xCnhStarcom MediaVest, Twitter Reach Upfront TV Data Dealby David Goetzl, Yesterday, 3:39 PM
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 38The upfront concept continues to expand. With the NewFronts moving into year two, Twitter has reached a first upfront deal with StarcomMediaVest Group (SMG), which covers both inventory and data access.SMG gains preferred opportunities with Twitter ad products, such as Promoted Tweets, accounts and trends (and possibly others indevelopment).Just as prominent is the opportunity to tap into proprietary Twitter data to analyze how TV and Twitter impact one another and forces drivingan ecosystem of paid, earned and owned media.Lisa Weinstein, SMG president in global digital and analytics, referred to the deal as ‚inventory-plus.‛Unlike most TV upfront arrangements, the agreement covers multiple years. SMG has had a lengthy relationship with Twitter and is on path tobecome the social media network’s first ‚certified‛ agency.The two will work together to create a ‚Social TV Lab‛ that will deliver insight into how TV viewing might impact Twitter activity and vice versa.It’s clear the two have a reciprocal relationship, but Weinstein said: ‚We want to be able to better quantify what that is.‛Insight gained there could have broader implications for SMG’s efforts to better allocate dollars toward paid, earned and owned mediachannels. The group calls the concept ‚convergence modeling.‛Certainly, Twitter can provide unending data that can allow marketers to shift strategies and budgets in near real-time. ‚We’re collaborating onhow we better quantify the overall value of this 24/7 world,‛ Weinstein said.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/198647/starcom-mediavest-twitter-reach-upfront-tv-data-d.html?edition=59119#ixzz2RHzKdquBJeff Bezos Secrets to High Conversion RatesBryan Eisenberg | April 19, 2013 |If you do business, online or traditional business, I hope you took the time to read Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos 2013 shareholder letter.In it he shares this tidbit:"Our heavy investments in Prime, AWS, Kindle, digital media, and customer experience in general strike some as too generous, shareholderindifferent, or even at odds with being a for-profit company. Amazon, as far as I can tell, is a charitable organization being run by elements ofthe investment community for the benefit of consumers, writes one outside observer.But I dont think so.To me, trying to dole out improvements in a just-in-time fashion would be too clever by half. It would be risky in a world as fast-moving asthe one we all live in.More fundamentally, I think long-term thinking squares the circle. Proactively delighting customers earns trust, which earns more businessfrom those customers, even in new business arenas. Take a long-term view, and the interests of customers and shareholders align."The reason many companies struggle is because of the metrics they choose to focus on. Since the early days of online marketing, people havebeen obsessed with traffic and H.I.T.S. (how idiots track success, as it is often called). If youre shaking your head about this one, so am I.Roy Williams, the "Wizard of Ads," shared a similarly brilliant insight from one of his fastest growing retail clients in his Monday Morning Memo:I asked, "How is traffic trending? Are we ahead of last year?""Roy, I dont measure traffic.""Youre kidding.""Last week one of my salespeople made 63 sales presentations and closed only 24 of them. That tells me 39 people bought somewhereelse. And right now theyre telling all their friends why they bought where they did. Theyre showing off their purchases and explaining why theydidnt buy from us.""Good point.""That salesperson is no longer with us."
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 39"Youre really serious about this.""Todays close rate is the most reliable indicator of tomorrows traffic. When close rate is high, traffic increases. When close rate begins toslide, traffic soon begins to slide as well."The same applies online!How is your conversion rate trending?Please allow me to make a suggestion to you. You dont have a traffic problem, you have a conversion problem!I have been advocating since the mid-90s, and in this column since 2001, that "conversion rate is a measure of your ability to persuade visitorsto take the action you want them to take. Its a reflection of your effectiveness and customer satisfaction. For you to achieve your goals,visitors must first achieve theirs."When a visitor comes to your website prepared to buy - not everyone will buy right away, of course - and isnt converted by your salesprocess, she is likely to buy from one of your competitors. When she brags to her friends about what she bought and who she bought it from,it wont be you she raves about. Its the customer experience that matters.Can you tell me why the consumer shouldnt have bought it from you if she came to your website?P.S. If you want to improve your customers experience and increase conversion rates, please check out how to master your conversion rateoptimization, and why it must be your CEOs responsibility to increase conversion rates.How Will Google Glass Change Internet Marketing?Jayson DeMers | April 16, 2013For all the hype about Google Glass, not much has been said about how its going to change Internet marketing.Could it be that for all our gadget drool, were overlooking what could be the biggest Internet marketing explosion of the decade? Or willGoogle Glass even make a ripple in online marketing?Lets look at some possible outcomes, lay out the facts, and propose some ways you can be ready for the rollout of Google Glass, and theimpact it will have on the Internet marketing world.Possible OutcomesFor the best perspective on this question, its best to take a step back and consider Googles marketing strategy. Obviously, Google isnt goingto divulge whatever marketing secrets they have for their tricked-out glasses. The nearly-$1,500 price tag is a sign that theyre not giving themaway for free.But isnt there more to it than just selling glasses? How might Google capitalize on Google Glass beyond the first wave of sales?Its a tricky question for several reasons.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 40Google Glass is unlike anything that Google has done before. Come to think of it, its unlike anything that anyone has ever done. Humankind istreading into an area of vague outcomes.There is so much potential for Google Glass that its hard to get our head around all the possibilities.There are a few options.Google has no bigger marketing plans. Its just a cool gadget. Its just technology. Lets take Google at their word and believe the Google repwho said, "Were more interested in making the hardware available, [than advertising on it]." That would be nice. Google may not be completelyaltruistic, but they may indeed have a pure desire to advance technology in the world today.Google Glass will fizzle and die. Some people seem to think weve reached the utopia of technology: "Sooner or later [Google Glass] willbecome a staple in our daily lives," writes one zealous technophile. Then again, maybe not. Forbes contributor Rob Asghar pessimisticallyprognosticates, "Google Glass seems a longshot to endure past the early fascination of the early adopters." Maybe the Glass will join theGoogle graveyard alongside Google Reader, Buzz, and iGoogle.Google will use it for advertising. "At the moment, there are no plans for advertising on this device," said Babak Parviz, lead engineer on theGoogle Glass project. Operative word: now. Babak said so in a December 2012 interview. Thus, there might be some future chance atadvertising revenue. Todd Wasserman at Mashable has suggested that Google Glass will provide coupon offers, personalized ads, andgamification¬” in other words, advertising on spectacle steroids.Google is going into gaming, or something else entirely. During the interview cited above, Babak spoke opaquely of "augmented reality."Augmented reality is the realm of gaming. Though Google isnt exactly known for their games, maybe theyre trying to edge into the marketwith augmented reality hardware. This, however, is unlikely. Perhaps when the API comes out and Google releases developer kits, then thegamers will jump in and have their heyday. But augmented reality glasses arent just the domain of gamers. Those who are itching to get a pairof glasses are excited about using them as politicians, adventurers, farmers, performers, service personnel, military, medical professionals, andnearly every other field of labor known to humankind. Just like we can all think of some way to make a smartphone useful to anyone, so we canimagine that Google Glass will have a similar impact.Maybe Google is just innovating the future again. As Babak plainly stated, "We constantly try out new ideas of how this platform can be used.Theres a lot of experimentation going on at all times in Google."And maybe thats the whole point. Its not like Google has exactly cashed in on unmanned cars (yet). Its probably safest to predict nothing,while still expecting the technology to shift and shape our world.Such shifting and shaping is unpredictable. Consider this. Youre wearing your Google Glasses, riding the subway downtown with friends. Yousay the words "hungry" and "dinner," and your Google Glasses inform you that Molinari Delicatessen is a few minutes away at the Broadway &Grant Avenue station. Plus you get a free drink for just checking in on Foursquare. Is that advertising? Is that an invasion of privacy? Werentyou just talking with friends?Things can get a little blurry.3 Back-to-Reality FactsProphesying aside, what do we actually know about Google Glass? Is there anything that we are confident will happen? There are at leastthree.At-a-Glance Search ResultsForget having information at your fingertips. With Google Glass, youve got it at a glance, quite literally. Google Glass responds to voicecommands and queries, meaning that users can easily gain results for questions about nearby restaurants or other local establishments. Thiswould provide very little new in terms of search results, but would instead provide a different interface for results, and perhaps moreinstantaneous searching while on the go.Location-Specific SearchesThe technology of Google Glass will make it possible to look at a restaurant, check out their rankings, view their menu, find out if there isseating, and maybe even snag a coupon code, all the while dawdling on the sidewalk out front. Google Glass is primed for on-the-spot activity.Theres no hidden agenda here. Google proudly announces that their spectacles will provide "directions right in front of you" for driving,walking, or just knocking about town.More Social Interactivity
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 41Google Glass will play directly into social networking. One of the main features of the device is taking pictures and videos, and sharing them.Such sharing will provide instant marketing, negative or positive, for whatever establishment or event the user is at. Social reviews will alsoregister on search results, giving users a better perspective on whether they want to patronize a certain business establishment.Get Ready for Google Glass: A StrategyIf you read this article expecting to get to the Google Glass gold rush early, you might be disappointed. Theres not exactly a gold rush goingon. Nevertheless, there is some rock-solid advice for how to posture yourself and your business for the unleashing of Google Glass.Stick closeto Google. It pays to keep your ear to the ground about Google trends and developments. What happens in the Googleplex is crucial to yourmarketing future. As much as we may dislike it, we rely on Google for a lot. When they flinch, we scramble. Thats all there is to it.Keep your Google+ profile robust and active. One obvious trend that will impact all things search related is Google+, along with authorship andAuthor Rank. Stay plugged in to it. Google+/Local results will be immediately accessible to Google Glass, meaning that you want to get in onthose searches.If youre a local company, focus in on local search results and social media. Google Glass is a geospecific marketing tool. Dont get left behind.Furthermore, there is talk of other social sites like Twitter amping up their efforts to get in on the Google Glass action.Google Glass is going to be here in just a few months. Dont expect a tsunami of change all at once. Instead, wait, watch, and listen. GoogleGlass will probably stick around for a while. Somehow, some way, Google Glass and Internet marketing are going to meet up for a magicalconnection. You want to be ready.BII REPORT: Why Mobile Video Is Set To ExplodeMobile video has exploded for a few main reasons. One is the rollout of faster 4G LTE wireless networks, which support on-the-go videohabits.A second reason is that younger audiences are adopting mobile video habits very quickly.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 42Another is the spread of tablets. Devices like the full-size iPad and Kindle Fire „ with their nine or 10-inch high resolution screens „ areemerging as consumers favored video playback devices. The tablet owner is therefore emerging as a hotly pursued target for mobile video.In a new report, BI Intelligence breaks down the mobile video ecosystem, analyzing the behavior and devices behind the growth in consumption,examining the demographics and behavior of mobile video consumers, detailing how mobile video monetization is booming, and looking atpotential barriers to mobile videos continued rise.Access the Full Report By Signing Up For A Free Trial Today >>>Heres a brief overview of how tablets are driving an explosion in mobile video:Tablet use peaks in the evening hours and weekends, when households historically have gathered around TV sets: Tablets are also family-friendly and are often shared by parents with their children. Because tablet users watch video according to patterns similar to those oftraditional TV audiences, they are easier to understand and target for marketers and broadcasters who are already comfortable with the worldof TV. For example, tablet video viewers tend to spend most of their time on longer videos.Video is one of the main reasons people use tablets: comScore consumer data for 2012 shows that two video-related activities „ playingvideos and sharing them „ are among the top ten favorite things to do for tablet users. For smartphone users, neither activity cracks the top-10 list.Tablet users tend to have higher conversion rates than those on smartphones: This has already been borne out in the context of search adsand e-commerce, and the touchable surfaces and larger screens suggest that tablet video ads would enjoy the same benefit.Tablet owners are far more likely than the average U.S. consumer to disconnect their pay TV subscriptions: They are far more likely to usealternative streaming and download services like Hulu, Apple TV, iTunes, Netflix, and Google TV, according to a January 2013 survey fromMorgan Stanley.Among younger viewers in the U.S., millennials aged 14 to 23, tablets are nearly as popular for watching TV shows as Blu-rays or DVDs:Twenty-five percent of respondents in this age group say they watch TV shows on tablets everyday or weekly, compared to 24 percent whodo so on DVD or Blu-ray, according to Deloittes State Of The Media Democracy survey conducted in late 2012.Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-why-mobile-video-is-set-to-explode-2013-4#ixzz2QuvUH6slThanks to DVR and Streaming Services, Binge TV Viewers AboundAPR 18, 2013PrintEmailFree NewsletterUsing an online subscription services is the top method for binge TV viewingAdvancements in cable television and digital video streaming have made it increasingly easy for consumers to watch TV content on their ownschedules. With technologies like DVR and video on-demand (VOD), they can catch up on their favorite shows or watch commercial-free whenthey please. Also, streaming services like Netflix have made it all the easier for viewers to watch just one more episode„and then one more„from the comfort of their home.A February 2013 study by market research firm Harris Interactive looked at how consumers used TV advancements to watch when they wantand ‚binge-view‛ TV content. According to the findings, nearly eight out of 10 US adult internet users watched TV on their own schedule. Ofthose consumers, 41% did so through a cable or satellite on-demand service. Forty percent did so through a web-based streaming service likeHulu, Hulu Plus or Netflix. Thirty-seven percent used a recording device like TiVo or DVR, and 29% watched physical DVDs.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 43Of those who have watched TV on their own schedule, Harris reported that62% watched multiple episodes of a TV show in succession, also known as ‚binge-viewing.‛ Younger consumers were more likely to watchmultiple episodes in a row than their older counterparts„78% of 18- to 29-year-olds binge-viewed and so did 73% of 30- to 39-year-olds,compared with 58% of 40- to 54-year-olds.In terms of the content they binge on, the greatest percentage of respondents (22%) told Harris they did so with older shows or past seasonsof current shows, compared with only 12% who did so with current seasons of shows.Global entertainment research firm MarketCast also examined the binge-view phenomenon in February 2013 and found that most US TVviewers (63%) had used an online subscription service (like Netflix) to binge-view TV. Moreover, 41% said that online subscription services
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 44were their primary method for doing so. A little more than half of TV viewers said they binged via a network or cable website, yet only 15%said that was their primary method for binge-viewing. Forty-four percent of TV viewers binge-viewed with DVR, yet like TV websites, only 15%used it as their primary method.Broadcast and cable TV networks are thinking about how to capitalize on this phenomenon in a smart way. From offering catch-up streamingsessions on their websites, to launching subscription-based portals like HBO Go, it’s an area that could potentially benefit both the network andthe consumer. Jesse Redniss, SVP of digital at cable television channel USA Network, told eMarketer: ‚Consumer habits are moving towardaccessibility of where they want it, when they want it and how they want it.‛ He went on to explain how USA has launched programs toencourage marathon viewing or catch-up viewing before a big episode or a show’s premiere.Prior to its premiere of season two of ‚Suits,‛ USA ran a ‚catch-up stunt,‛ and made season one’s episodes available for streaming on Huluand USANetwork.com, as well as on VOD. According to Redniss, the stunt drove an increase of close to eight million views of the ‚Suits‛franchise. In terms of catch-up viewing, 60% was via VOD and 38% was via streaming„either on Hulu or USA’s site. ‚Those results havereally made us think about how we are bringing in new viewership and how we are talking to our fan bases and using them as brandambassadors to help market our shows,‛ Redniss said.Read more at http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Thanks-DVR-Streaming-Services-Binge-TV-Viewers-Abound/1009823#V8QDMRTBhMjshcyM.99Maioria pula anúncios em vídeos onlinePesquisa entre internautas brasileiros mostra que 65% evitam propaganda no YouTube e 60% consideram as peças ‚chatas‛17 de Abril de2013 “ 14:09Estudo realizado pela agência de mídia online Hi-Mídia em parceria com a empresa de pesquisa digital M.Sense mostra que 65% das pessoasque assistem a vídeos online pulam as propagandas e somente 38% procuram o site do anunciante após ver o filme. O trabalho investigouhábitos de consumo audiovisual na web e entrevistou 300 usuários de internet em diversas regiões brasileiras entre janeiro e fevereiro.O YouTube é o portal mais citado, com 94% dos respondentes declarando o site como principal destino para ver vídeos. Essa porcentagemestá muito à frente do segundo lugar, o Google Videos, mecanismo de busca da própria empresa dona do YouTube, com 28%. Cerca de 27%afirmaram assistir a vídeos de redes sociais, 20% no Yahoo!, 18% na MSN e só 2% afirmaram não ver vídeos na internet.Clipes musicais e vídeos de shows são os campeões de audiência, com 72% procurando por esse tipo de conteúdo, seguidos de vídeosengraçados, com 64%; filmes, com 47%; noticiário, com 42%; trailers e documentários, ambos com 41%; entrevistas, com 37%; e tutoriais,com 36%. O curioso é que 60% desconhecem a existência de canais de conteúdo produzidos especificamente para o YouTube.Antes de realizar uma compra, 58% dos entrevistados procuram por informações do produto em vídeos. Por outro lado, a relação comanúncios não é das melhores. Além dos 65% que pulam a propaganda, 60% consideram chatas as peças que antecedem os vídeos. Cerca de18% dos entrevistados desistem de assistir ao vídeo que aguardavam por causa de anúncios.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 45Estados Unidos - A Nielsen publicou nessa terça 16 resultados de uma pesquisa sobre consumo de mídia por jovens americanos com dadossobre a audiência de TV e vídeos online. Adolescentes entre 12 e 17 anos assistem mensalmente uma média de sete horas e 48 minutos devídeos em smartphones ” 18% a mais que a faixa de 18 a 24 anos e 46% a mais que 25 a 34 anos. A faixa de 18 a 24 ganha no tempodedicadas a vídeos em computador (15 horas e oito minutos) e a de 25 a 34 ganha em TV (136 horas e dez minutos).Televisão ainda é, em todas as faixas, a campeã, com cerca de cem horas de audiência mensal, mesmo entre os mais jovens. Mas smartphonesé o aparelho com maior crescimento entre os jovens, com aumento de penetração em 45% no ano passado.Leia Mais: http://www.meioemensagem.com.br/home/midia/noticias/2013/04/17/Maioria-pula-anuncios-em-videos-online.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=mmbymail-geral&utm_content=Maioria+pula+an%FAncios+em+v%EDdeos+online#ixzz2QoSo5mfJThe Ads That Know Too MuchAds that follow you from one website to another are increasingly common, but in the rush for more tailored advertising, age-old wisdom may belost.Jessica LeberAll over the Web, ads are getting more personal. They follow you from one site to the next and know your browsing history. But are such adsreally effective? The answer may not be as obvious as digital marketers assume.‚There’s been a focus on trying to identify the customers likely to purchase a product. But that’s distinct from which customers will beinfluenced by advertising,‛ says Catherine Tucker, an MIT Sloan School of Management professor who gave a keynote address at aninternational data mining conference in February.In the rush to use ever-more data about people, Tucker says, ads are too often shown to those who have already decided whether to buy ornot buy the product, or who have bought it already. ‚What we may be doing is wasting a lot of money.‛Tucker has focused her studies on the growing number of personalized ads. In an experiment with an online travel firm, for example, she sawthat ads tailored to a specific browsing history were, on average, less effective than generic ads for the site when shown to people who hadrecently visited. ‚You’ve been to the website and looked at the products. There’s probably a good reason why you didn’t buy it,‛ she says. Thisis akin to an age-old marketing maxim„‚timing is everything‛„that Tucker says is being lost in the digital age.In 2012, companies in the U.S. spent nearly $2 billion to buy online display advertising through real-time bidding platforms, according toeMarketer. These platforms allow algorithms to strike split-second deals about which ad to show a person as his or her computer loads a webpage, a negotiation that often takes the ad recipient’s browsing history into account.The practice of serving ads that match past online behavior, generally called ‚retargeting,‛ is growing more important for many onlinebusinesses, which are making increasing use of fine-grained data about products or pages that a person has viewed or searched. Last month,even Facebook said it would allow marketers to retarget ads in people’s News Feeds based on their browsing history. Advertisers have alsobegun tracking people across different devices they use (see ‚Get Ready for Ads That Follow You from One Device to the Next‛).Advertisers say there is no question that retargeted and highly personal ads work, says Kip Voytek, director of digital innovation at themarketing firm MDC Partners, but are also aware that there is room to refine their approach. Generally, they must work within digital ad buyingoptions available from Web publishers and technology providers, which have been slow to evolve.Tucker doesn’t advocate dropping the practice of retargeting. She just says that marketers may need to get smarter, for instance by showinga personalized ad for a product, like a sneaker, only once a person has indicated, through browsing, that he or she may be back in the marketto make a purchase. Even showing a retargeted ad by filtering how long ago a person last visited a site is a piece of information not oftenused today. A person who visited an online flower shop is more likely to buy flowers the following day, not two weeks later. On the other hand,a car company may have more time to influence a shopper.Meanwhile, technologies that track ad performance are getting better. For example, Anindya Ghose, codirector of New York University’s Centerfor Business Analytics, cites a startup called C3metrics that is perfecting ways to track not only people across multiple devices, but also totrack their ‚engagement‛ with mobile ads by determining whether they scrolled down far enough to even see it, or whether they hovered theirmouse over the ad on a webpage.With all of the money involved, and marketers needing to be convinced that mobile ads are also effective, ads will surely continue to makesmarter and smarter predictions. More than simply follow you around the Web, they may also know what you actually want to buy.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 46Men lead the way in mobile shoppingCHICAGO: Men are more likely than women to shop via their mobile phones, multimarket research by Kantar Media has revealed.The research company said technology was helping to reverse the stereotype of the man who dislikes shopping, as its Global TGI indexshowed men in developed and emerging markets were more interested than women in mcommerce.In some instances they were more than twice as likely to make a purchase from their phone. In Germany, the proportion of men using phonesto buy was 5%, compared to just 1.9% of women.The country with the greatest percentage of men buying was the US, where 15.9% did so, against a figure of 13.3% of women.Comparable figures for the UK were 12% and 10.3% respectively and, for Australia, 9.5% versus 9.2%.In South Africa the figures were 4.7% for men and 2.5% for women, in Colombia 2.5% and 1.3%.The patterns in Brazil and France were almost identical, at 2.3% and 1.7% for the former nation and 2.2% and 1.7% for the latter.These two countries also illustrated another finding of the research ” that mobile shoppers are more predisposed to impulse purchasing.In France, 13% of mobile shoppers said they tended to spend money without thinking, compared to 6% of the general population. In Brazil, thecomparable figures were 36% and 29%"Retail is being revolutionised by the smartphone, and the resulting shopping apps and mobile websites," said Polly Christie, senior globalaccount manager at Kantar Media Global TGI."Consumers are firmly in the driving seat and retailers need to use renewed insight and analysis to ensure their offering is truly customer-focused," she added.Data sourced from Kantar Media; additional content by Warc staff , 17 April 2013Read more at http://www.warc.com/LatestNews/News/EmailNews.news?ID=31280&Origin=WARCNewsEmail#9Q7mwZMdId1T1xWR.99Video on demand complements TVLONDON: Video on demand can add to the reach of TV and extend campaign messaging when television advertising is off air, a report hasrevealed.TV and VOD: Friends with Benefits, a joint research study undertaken by Tremor Video, IAB UK, Nielsen and Performics, was based on researchof UK consumers and a range of UK ad campaigns and found that VOD can add between 0.19% and 1.33% to the reach of TV."This study confirms what we have known to be true ” that VOD and TV are friends with benefits ” a perfect complement to each other," saidDoron Wesly, head of market strategy at New York-based Tremor Video."TV advertising does a fantastic job of raising brand awareness. VOD advertising amplifies it further, and can extend the life of a campaignsbrand message well after the TV ads stop," he added.The incremental reach it achieved varied by category, with alcoholic beverages registering by far the greatest increase at 1.33%.This was followed by technology, on 0.45%, finance on 0.44%, beverages on 0.33% and retail on 0.19%.The study also found that VOD bolstered brand awareness by 5.5% and helped to extend the life of a campaign when it is no longer running onTV.This effect was most noticeable amongst "light" TV viewers, classed as those watching less than 14 hours a week, indicating that VOD can bea useful way to reach people who dont watch TV that much.Maurico Leon, commercial director of Performics, ZenithOptimedias performance marketing arm, commented: "Using VOD to support a TVcampaign and adopting a strategy of heavy VOD presence once the TV campaign has ended means clients can now use VOD to maintain thegreat work their TV campaign has done in terms of reach and awareness and get an extended audio-visual presence cost-effectively."It was, he concluded, "a must for any advertiser who cannot be on TV 52 weeks of the year".
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 47Read more at http://www.warc.com/LatestNews/News/EmailNews.news?ID=31275&Origin=WARCNewsEmail#lVJC0ylXEfu2tYYR.99Bolha imobiliária estourando? Onde?Revista Istoé 04/2013 Por Ricardo AmorimDesde 2008, quando surgiram os primeiros comentários de bolha imobiliária em vias de estourar no Brasil, tenho analisado evidênciashistóricas e internacionais, refutando até aqui tais alegações e concluindo que, provavelmente, os preços continuariam a subir.De acordo com a consultoria britânica Knight Frank, entre os 53 países com os maiores mercados imobiliários globais, o Brasil teve em 2012 amaior alta de preços de imóveis residenciais: 13,7% em média. Resolvi atualizar e expandir meus estudos.Há um ano, usei o consumo anual per capita de cimento como estimativa do grau de aquecimento da atividade no setor imobiliário emmomentos de estouro de bolhas em vários países. Hoje, pelas minhas contas, este indicador chegou a 361Kg no Brasil. No ritmo médio decrescimento dos últimos 10 anos, que foi de 5% a.a., em apenas dois anos atingiríamos o nível mais baixo de estouro de bolhas, que é de400Kg, o que sugeriria cautela. Por outro lado, o nível máximo de consumo de cimento antes bolhas estourarem, em alguns casos passou de1.600Kg anuais per capita. Para chegar a este patamar, o Brasil levaria mais 80 anos. Por este parâmetro, poderíamos estar entre 2 e 80 anosdo estouro de uma bolha. Pouco se conclui.O segundo indicador importante é o total de crédito imobiliário disponível. Crédito permite que mais gente compre imóveis, aumentando aprocura por eles e elevando seus preços. No Brasil, apesar do crescimento dos últimos anos, ele ainda é de apenas 7% do PIB, muito distantedos 50% do PIB que costuma ser o mínimo quando bolhas imobiliárias estouram. Mesmo considerando-se uma expansão ao ritmo dos doisúltimos anos, que foi de 1,4% do PIB ao ano, o mais rápido da nossa história, levaríamos mais de 30 anos para chegar a 50% do PIB. Sinal detranquilidade.Por fim, como anda a capacidade de pagamento dos brasileiros? Levando em conta preços dos imóveis em relação à renda no mundo, chama aatenção a grande dispersão entre as maiores cidades brasileiras, com algumas entre as mais caras e outras entre as mais baratas.Das 50 cidades mais caras do planeta, 49 estão em países emergentes, incluindo quatro no Brasil: Brasília (10ª), Rio de Janeiro (25ª), BeloHorizonte (43ª) e Porto Alegre (45ª). Por outro lado, Salvador não está mais entre as 100 mais caras do mundo, Fortaleza é uma das únicas 10cidades entre as 50 mais baratas do mundo que não estão nos EUA, e Campinas também está entre as 100 mais baratas. Entre os 385maiores mercados imobiliários globais, a classificação média das 11 cidades brasileiras incluídas foi 124ª, sugerindo que o mercado brasileirocomo um todo está um pouco mais caro do que a média, mas distante dos mais caros do planeta. Entre os mercados emergentes, o Brasil estámais barato do que a média.Outro aspecto favorável é que um menor percentual da renda necessário para pagamento mensal de hipotecas sugere que no Brasil temosmelhor capacidade de honrar dívidas. Além disso, comparando o preço de compra de imóveis com o custo de alugá-lo, constata-se que noBrasil alugueis elevados estimulam compras mais do que no resto do mundo. Por fim, a desvalorização do real barateou os imóveis no Brasilpara compradores estrangeiros.Em resumo, ainda que algumas cidades sugiram mais cautela, para o país como um todo, continuam valendo as conclusões do ano passado.Altas modestas ou manutenção de preços são prováveis na maioria dos casos e o risco de estouro imediato de uma bolha imobiliária nacionalainda é baixo. Se você está na esperança dos preços despencarem para comprar, espere sentado. Segundo Platão, coragem é saber o quenão temer.Mobile Ad Networks Begin Taking a Back Seat to PublishersMatt Kapko | April 15, 2013Are we witnessing the decline of mobile ad networks or the ascent of publishers selling mobile ads? It depends on who you ask and how youlook at it. Mobile ad networks no longer command the majority of spending mobile display ads in the US, according to a new report from IDC.Mobile ad networks, such as Google, Millennial Media and Apple, have been supplanted by mobile publishers like Facebook, Pandora andTwitter.Mobile publishers controlled 52 percent of US mobile display ad spending last year, a significant increase from the 39 percent they collectivelycontrolled the year prior."Mobile ad networks are losing market share to publishers, and we expect them to lose even more going forward," notes Karsten Weide, vicepresident of media and entertainment at IDC.Mobile advertising spend grew 88 percent in the US last year to $4.5 billion. Mobile also comprised a double-digit share of the overall digitalad market for the first time in 2012, reaching an 11 percent share, up from 7 percent in 2011. IDC projects mobile ad spending will grow at least55 percent in the US this year for a total of about $7 billion. All this comes despite mobile growing at a slower pace year-over-year and nolonger experiencing annual growth rates in the triple digits.Mobile display ads generated $1.7 billion in 2012 and gained 8 percentage points on search, comprising 39 percent of total mobile spend in theUS last year.Meanwhile, search still remains the dominant channel for mobile ad spend at 61 percent or $2.8 billion, according to IDC.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 48Facebook ended the year on top, clearing $234 million on mobile display ads, followed close behind by Pandora at $229 million, the firmreports. Twitter came in at third place, selling $117 million worth of mobile display ads.Google remains the top dog on the ad network front at $243 million. Millennial Media surpassed Apple last year with $151 million in mobiledisplay ad revenue versus the iPhone-makers $125 million, and Jumptap closed the year at number four with $90 million.Increase Big Data Opportunities and Minimize ObstaclesNew research from the CMO Council reveals that both CMOs and CIOs believe big data is a key competitive differentiator and will be core toimplementing a more customer-centric business culture. However, the study results also show most CMOs and CIOs consider big data partopportunity and part obstacle (61 percent of marketers and 60 percent of IT executives). In fact, 52 percent of marketers and 45 percent of ITprofessionals believe functional silos block aggregation of data from across the organization, making it difficult to truly achieve customercentricity.Isn’t it time for those silos to come down? Aren’t you ready to develop a strategic partnership with the CIO?Among the groups I’ve been meeting with (most recently at the 2013 Marketing Hall of Femme, e.g.), I can sense that marketers are feeling thepressure to integrate and become data-driven.More specifically, here are the steps I know savvy CMOs taking as they work to eliminate obstacles and better leverage the opportunities bigdata provides:Start with a reality check. Forward-thinking CMOs realize CIOs and their IT teams are essential to modernizing and integrating marketingprocesses both internally and externally.Embrace collaboration. Partnerships are growing as CMOs who may not be well-versed in IT are surrounding themselves with experienced andaccomplished applications marketing technologists.Enjoy the ride. Integrating marketing and data is a BIG job, and successful CMOs are learning to pace themselves. Blending data, customerinteractions and processes across organizations is not a project . . . It’s a journey.Take a long-term view. CMOs and CIOS are building roadmaps to tackle big data challenges together ”all with an eye towards elevating thecustomer experience.The CMOs I see leading the marketing revolution ”the ones who are driving greater value with true customer-centric strategies ”are finding away to bring marketing and IT together. Granted, many of these relationships are only beginning, but they’re growing and getting stronger witheach passing Q. If you want to maintain your competitive edge, you don’t really have a choice. These days, business success depends on arobust, strategic partnership between the CMO and CIO.CMO COUNCIL FINDS BIG DATA CRITICAL TO CUSTOMER-CENTRICCULTURESNew Study Reveals Total Partnership and Collaboration Between Marketing and IT Often Stymied by Lack of Common Definition of CustomerCentricity and Battles Over BudgetPALO ALTO, Calif. (April 2, 2013)„The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) and Chief Information Officer (CIO), often believed to be fundamentallyat odds, have found common ground in big data as both an obstacle and an opportunity. According to the findings of a new study from theCMO Council, in partnership with SAS, both marketers and IT executives believe big data is a key competitive differentiator and will be core toimplementing a more customer-centric business culture.Big data has emerged as the critical factor to achieving an enterprise-wide customer-centric culture, according to 40 percent of marketers and51 percent of IT respondents. However, both also agree that big data is part obstacle and part opportunity (61 percent of marketers and 60percent of IT executives), and a further 52 percent of marketers and 45 percent of IT professionals believe functional silos block aggregationof data from across the organization, making it difficult to truly achieve customer centricity.The study also reveals that the two functions are more aligned than many may think. Some 41 percent of marketers and 39 percent of ITexecutives say they are aligned with one another, but both admit there are still challenges to executing priority projects. Regardless of anysetbacks, both overwhelmingly agree that the relationship is critical, according to 85 percent of marketers and 85 percent of IT executives.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 49‚In this age of digital engagement, it is easy to see how the roles of the CMO and CIO are intertwined,‛ said Donovan Neale-May, ExecutiveDirector of the CMO Council. ‚But the relationship has evolved beyond platforms and processes and has become solidified over the data needsof the organization. Separately, the two roles can devolve into bickering over budget, ownership and governance. But aligned and coupled,these two roles become silo-busters, with the ultimate goal of enabling enterprise-wide customer centricity.‛Multiple areas of opportunity emerge where further alignment and collaboration will improve the organization’s ability to execute customer-centric programs. Marketing is looking for a strategic partner that will come to the table with initiatives to advance customer centricity (26percent). Marketing also believes the greatest value in the relationship can manifest in the ability of the organization to better gather data fromacross the enterprise (63 percent). For their part, IT executives see marketing as their partner in advancing analytics and data-driven decisionmaking throughout the organization (62 percent). However, IT would like marketing to approach them earlier in the process to collaborate moreon strategy (62 percent) and not just platform selection and deployment.‚Both groups are eager for more„that much is clear,‛ Neale-May added. ‚Yet something is still missing as both marketing and IT admit thatstrong, centralized leadership is lacking, making it hard for the relationship to stay focused and on track.‛Both marketing and IT say the top aspect that defines a customer-centric organization is a corporate culture that puts the customer at thecenter of all processes and business decisions. And they admit that this and other key attributes of customer centricity have only beenpartially adopted (31 percent of marketers/33 percent of IT executives).A lack of clear ownership of the customer is likely at the core of this partial commitment to a customer focus. The customer is not clearlyowned by a single office as both CMO and CIO agree that ownership rests across the CEO (18 percent of marketing/20 percent of IT); CMO(17 percent of marketing/19 percent of IT); sales (19 percent of marketing/15 percent of IT); or is simply undefined and spread across multiplefunctions (14 percent of marketing/17 percent of IT). This lack of centralized customer ownership has resulted in a scenario where 48 percentof marketers and 44 percent of IT executives are only moderately confident in ability of the organization’s core touchpoints to reach andengage with the customer.‚Of all the C-suite executives, the CMO and CIO are most primed to drive customer-centricity throughout the organization,‛ said Wilson Raj,Global Customer Intelligence Director of SAS. ‚The CMO and CIO must become comrades in gathering and analyzing data across theenterprise, and adopting technologies that anticipate, automate and accelerate customer engagements.‛Interestingly, for those organizations who believe they have total partnership between marketing and IT, the CEO is the primary owner of thecustomer„not sales. And both marketing and IT are both highly satisfied with the organization’s ability to reach and engage the customer (42percent of marketing/31 percent of IT). These CMOs and CIOs also agree that the lines of responsibility around customer-centric programs andbig data are easy to define; marketing develops both the customer engagement strategy (80 percent of marketing/80 percent of IT) and theinsights into customers and customer requirements (84 percent of marketing/65 percent of IT). IT focuses on aggregating and delivering datafrom across the enterprise (64 percent of marketing/65 percent of IT).The 153-page report features the results of an online survey of 237 senior marketers and 210 senior IT executives, in addition to best-practiceprofiles from leading marketing and IT executives from brands including AIG Bank, Allianz Life Insurance, American Cancer Society, Brown-Forman, Citi, Commercial Metals Company, Conde Nast, Farmers Insurance Gorup, First American Financial, First Tech Federal Credit Union, FourSeasons Hotels & Resorts, GM, Hilton Worldwide, Intrawest, Lockheed Martin, Magnolia Federal Credit Union, Nexxo Financial Corporation,Omnicom Media Group, Outrigger Hotels & Resorts, Panasonic, PNC Financial Services, Rady Children’s Hospital”San Diego, Silicon Valley Bank,Transamerica Insurance & Investment Group, Wyndham Hotels Group and WellPoint. Both the survey and interviews were conducted across Q4of 2012 and Q1 of 2013. The report ($199 value) is available for download at (http://www.cmocouncil.org/r/cmo-cio-alignment). A complimentaryexecutive summary is also available. More information can be found at www.cmocioalign.org.About the CMO CouncilThe Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council is dedicated to high-level knowledge exchange, thought leadership and personal relationship buildingamong senior corporate marketing leaders and brand decision-makers across a wide range of global industries. The CMO Councils 6,500-plusmembers control more than $300 billion in aggregated annual marketing expenditures and run complex, distributed marketing and salesoperations worldwide. In total, the CMO Council and its strategic interest communities include more than 20,000 global executives in more than110 countries covering multiple industries, segments and markets. Regional chapters and advisory boards are active in the Americas, Europe,Asia-Pacific, Middle East, India and Africa. The councils strategic interest groups include the Coalition to Leverage and Optimize SalesEffectiveness (CLOSE), LoyaltyLeaders.org, Marketing Supply Chain Institute, Customer Experience Board, Market Sense-Ability Center, DigitalMarketing Performance Institute, GeoBranding Center and the Forum to Advance the Mobile Experience (FAME). More information about theCMO Council is available at www.cmocouncil.org.About SASSAS is the leader in business analytics software and services, and the largest independent vendor in the business intelligence market. Throughinnovative solutions, SAS helps customers at more than 60,000 sites improve performance and deliver value by making better decisionsfaster. Since 1976 SAS has been giving customers around the world THE POWER TO KNOW®.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 50SAS and all other SAS Institute Inc. product or service names are registered trademarks or trademarks of SAS Institute Inc. in the USA andother countries. ® indicates USA registration. Other brand and product names are trademarks of their respective companies. Copyright © 2013SAS Institute Inc. All rights reservedThe 6 Keys To Being Awesome At EverythingTony Schwartz, The Energy Project | Nov. 16, 2010, 9:06 AM | 252,076 | 8Ive been playing tennis for nearly five decades. I love the game and I hit the ball well, but Im far from the player I wish I were.Ive been thinking about this a lot the past couple of weeks, because Ive taken the opportunity, for the first time in many years, to play tennisnearly every day. My game has gotten progressively stronger. Ive had a number of rapturous moments during which Ive played like the player Ilong to be.And almost certainly could be, even though Im 58 years old. Until recently, I never believed that was possible. For most of my adult life, Iveaccepted the incredibly durable myth that some people are born with special talents and gifts, and that the potential to truly excel in any givenpursuit is largely determined by our genetic inheritance.During the past year, Ive read no fewer than five books „ and a raft of scientific research „ which powerfully challenge that assumption (seebelow for a list). Ive also written one, The Way Were Working Isnt Working, which lays out a guide, grounded in the science of highperformance, to systematically building your capacity physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually.Weve found, in our work with executives at dozens of organizations, that its possible to build any given skill or capacity in the samesystematic way we do a muscle: push past your comfort zone, and then rest. Aristotle had it exactly right 2000 years ago: "We are what werepeatedly do." By relying on highly specific practices, weve seen our clients dramatically improve skills ranging from empathy, to focus, tocreativity, to summoning positive emotions, to deeply relaxing.Like everyone who studies performance, Im indebted to the extraordinary Anders Ericsson, arguably the worlds leading researcher into highperformance. For more than two decades, Ericsson has been making the case that its not inherited talent which determines how good webecome at something, but rather how hard were willing to work „ something he calls "deliberate practice." Numerous researchers now agreethat 10,000 hours of such practice as the minimum necessary to achieve expertise in any complex domain.There is something wonderfully empowering about this. It suggests we have remarkable capacity to influence our own outcomes. But thats alsodaunting. One of Ericssons central findings is that practice is not only the most important ingredient in achieving excellence, but also the mostdifficult and the least intrinsically enjoyable.If you want to be really good at something, its going to involve relentlessly pushing past your comfort zone, along with frustration, struggle,setbacks and failures. Thats true as long as you want to continue to improve, or even maintain a high level of excellence. The reward is thatbeing really good at something youve earned through your own hard work can be immensely satisfying.OMD Wins Experian Media Assignmentby Steve McClellan, Apr 11, 2013, 3:56 PMMarket research firm Experian has consolidated its media planning and buying assignment with Omnicom’s OMD after a review, the agency hasconfirmed. The client’s North American operational headquarters is located in Costa Mesa, CA.Incumbents on the account included Ocean Media and The Martin Agency, which had handled media planning duties. Martin will continue tohandle certain creative chores for the client. Creative duties were not part of the review.Contenders were said to have included Publicis Groupe’s Starcom, Horizon Media and WPP’s MEC. Sources said a key factor in the client’sdecision was its assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the West Coast operations of the contenders.The client spent about $65 million on ads last year, according to Kantar.OMD’s pitch was led out of its Los Angeles office, headed by Greg Castronuovo, president of OMD West.The Experian win is the second big win for OMD in two weeks. On March 29, it secured the $290 million planning and buying assignment fordrug store chain Walgreens. That account is being led out of OMD’s Chicago office.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 51Experian reported revenue for 2012 of nearly $4.5 billion, up 14%. The company is based in the UK and has four business segments, includingcredit services, decision analytics, marketing services and consumer services.An Experian rep declined to comment on the review.Local Online MediaIs Thrivingby Gavin OMalley, Apr 11, 2013, 3:39 PMJust a few years ago, the idea that online consumers would pay monthly fees for local news content would have seemed farfetched. As newresearch shows, however, thats exactly what’s happening. Even more remarkable, millions of consumers are now paying to access YellowPages listings with reviews.Remember the saying ‘Information wants to be free?’‛ asks Gordon Borrell, CEO of Borrell Associates and principal author of the report. Well,today, ‚millions [of consumers] are paying to access directory listings,‛ he says.As a result of these and similarly industry-friendly trends, the market for local online media did quite well in 2012. In fact, the average EBITDA(earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) margin for local digital operations that are leveraged out of traditional mediacompanies was 49% last year.‚Driving the figure [was] the fact that the vast majority aren’t charging for rent, advertising and content -- things that are already paid for bythe host company,‛ according to Borrell. Yet even ‚pure-play‛ companies were able to report margins of 20% to 30% last year, the reportfound.If current trends persist, digital ventures could be contributing half of company profits to these media companies in five years, Borrell predicts.Of all the entities selling digital advertising, newspapers averaged $2.2 million per site last year -- 50% more than the next-highest competitor.Spending by local business on media increased 20% in 2012 and is expected to jump 31% this year. Borrell Associates bases its findings onanalysis of 6,284 local operations and online ad-spending forecasts for 513 U.S. digital marketing regions.Among other entities, these include more than 2,000 radio stations, nearly 1,000 daily newspapers, and almost 1,000 Internet pure-playoperations.Women Are Watching More TV, Video, Prefer Positive Ad Messagesby David Goetzl, Apr 12, 2013, 5:24 PMAs women continue to play the key role in household purchasing decisions, advertisers might be encouraged that their video consumption as agroup continues to increase. Females 18 and older on average watched nearly 180 hours of live TV in the fourth quarter of 2012, up nearly 3%over the same period the year before.Meanwhile, video consumption on the Internet increased 45% to an average of 7 hours and 12 minutes. Viewing on mobile phones increased farless -- 7% to 5 hours and 2 minutes, Nielsen reports.Nielsen says that women spend more than men by $14.31 per trip to supercenters and by $10.32 to grocery stores.Still, increased female TV viewing isn’t occurring in all age groups; the average dropped from nearly 136 hours to 133 hours and 7 minutesamong the 18-to-34 segment. The group’s Internet consumption soared from an average of nearly 7 hours to close to 11 hours.Women in the 25-to-54 demo seem to make more use of DVRs than counterparts, with the highest level of time-shifted viewing at an averageof 17 hours and 28 minutes in the 2012 fourth quarter.Nielsen also reported that 116 million women ‚were active on the Web,‛ compared to 102 million males. Women outpace men in unique visitorson Netflix and Hulu, Nielsen says.Nielsen offered some tips for marketing to women with insight from Nielsen NeuroFocus concluding that ‚the female brain is programmed tomaintain social harmony, so messaging should be positive and not focus on negative comparisons or associations.‛ Nielsen NeuroFocus alsosays women ‚remember more and differently‛ than men.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 52While women continue to point the way in retail shopping, Nielsen says men are becoming more involved. ‚Between 2004 and 2012, U.S.women reduced the number of trips they made across most retail channels, while men increased their visits to all outlets except grocery anddrug stores,‛ Nielsen said.Big Data analysis allows businesses and governments to mine yourpersonal detailsAndrew CarswellThe Daily TelegraphApril 13, 2013 9:22PMTHERE was nothing suspicious in her tidy appearance; no clear body language that was trying to suppress something sinister; no evidence ofcard counting.She was just winning at Blackjack. And winning big.With her joy palpable and her glass always full, hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of mesmeric Las Vegas chips were being packed in neatbunches in front of her heavy mascara-clad eyesWas this a hot streak, or something shady? Two things this desert-bound casino city attracts in spades.High above the gaming floor in a darkened security room abuzz with monitors and the fast tech talk of analysts, a computer was about toascertain the truth.Combining a series of data software - including the fabled NORA (Non-Obvious Relationship Awareness) created by Jeff Jonas that specialisesin linking people through six degrees of separation - analysts used facial recognition to determine Miss Lady Lucks identity and rewound thesecurity cameras to track her entrance.There the computer found the woman parking a Hertz rental car in the casino car park, cross referenced the booking details and used externaldata to prove her brother had once shared a flat with the Blackjack dealer - 19 years earlier.Even an attempt to cover tracks by spelling her name incorrectly on the rental booking form failed to get past NORAs phenomenal reach andsmarts.Shed been made; and in such an effortless manner, which ended with a five year jail sentence for both the dealer and his accomplice.Whether one welcomes such innovative intrusion or not, this sophisticated world of Big Data analysis has arrived, a realm where both criminalindiscretions and consumer appetite will be targeted by a myriad of data analysts, or "geek squads", whose sole purpose is to connect thedots - to cross reference your data, paint a picture of who you are, determine what you want and plan how best to serve you.Or, in the case of the aforementioned gambler, pinpoint you as a crook, or at the very least, a welfare cheat.This so-called Big Data, which has emerged as the boardroom buzz word for 2013, could be in the form of your bank transactions, your phonecalls and texts, the treasure trove of personal details on your Twitter and Facebook account, your Google searches, the petitions you may havesigned, the purchases you have made, the information captured by websites and electronic sensors.It is a world which is set to revolutionise the way governments provide services; a world which allows businesses to build intimate relationshipswith customers; but a world which will ignite an intense debate on the issue of citizen privacy.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 53While Australia may only be ankle deep in the sea of opportunities that Big Data analytics offers, such methods are already being used to greateffect in the corporate sector, where companies have deployed teams of data analysts to turn their previously untapped internal and externalcustomer data into rich revenue streams.They are gaining an in-depth understanding of what their customers want, without even asking them.The major banks use their transactional data to offer customers personalised products and services which suit their needs, based on theirspending habits. Phone companies mine call data and social networks to offer personalised family and friend deals to customers.But the race had only just begun and big businesses are lining up to hire the best analytical minds across the globe to get the jump on theircompetitors."There are huge opportunities for business to actually own the customer," John Riccio, National Digital Leader for PricewaterhouseCooperssaid."At the end of the day, the intimacy of the customer and understanding where they are at in their life stage, and being able to proactivelypromote something to them, or offer something to them, at the heightened point of purchase, is where the opportunity is.""Most consumers are happy to share information if they know they will get more value back. So if you understand their preferences, wherethey are at in their life stage, understand what is happening in their circle, and the ability to actually take that information and provide a valueadded service that the consumer hasnt even had to think about, almost like reading their minds, then I think thats where the opportunity is forrevenue growth."PricewaterhouseCoopers maintains that Big Data is the next frontier for innovation, as businesses finally begin to analyse the vast stores ofdata they have been accumulating on Australians for years. That data has been sitting idly in windowless computer vaults that when crossreferenced with other data sets could deliver upwards of $3.8 billion in extra revenue.This hidden revenue stream has been well tapped by retail giants in the US and UK.Macys, the US fashion and accessories behemoth with its 73 million product lines, is using Big Data analysts to pour over historical salepatterns and social network data to determine exactly what it should be discounting, when, and in which of its 800 locations.Your off-hand rant on Twitter about the lack of discounting on jeans? Yes, it does in fact get noticed. Your Facebook post decrying the lack ofwhite-framed sunglasses? They are onto it.It is this analysis, which used to take months and can now bring about rolling changes in stores within hours, which has driven tremendousmarket share gains for the retailer.For Walmart, the worlds biggest retailer, marrying the more than one million hourly transactions at its stores with the 2.5 billion pieces ofcontent uploaded onto Facebook every day has become an art form.Its data analytics technology is now capable of building the contents of its local stores around what customers in the neighbourhood are sayingon social networks and through their Google searches.As well as honing their product line to suit the demographics, the retailer has also developed in-store mobile navigation where customers canbe guided through the aisles to products they have been talking about, or searching for, online.It also allows for loyalty customers to be targeted with deals on products which fit their demographic, purchasing methods, preferences oncolour, sizes and styles, and an understanding of what brings them back to the store - all gleaned from analysing their transactions and socialnetworking.But as businesses begin to see the monetary benefits of analysing their customer data, the wider benefits to society that Big Data offersshould not be underplayed, according to Chief Analytics Officer at SAS Australia, Evan Stubbs."There is tremendous focus in the private sector around the commercial value of big data. One of the messages that is missed is social value,"he said."You start looking at better disease prevention, early intervention and focussing on forward liability by rather than focusing on the issue athand, try and get ahead of the problem and use data to be able to do that. That is the power of big data."He cites a model used by the Indonesian Government to analyse its health records together with chatter on Twitter in an attempt to predictoutbreaks of deadly flus, ensuring hospitals are prepared in advance to deal with epidemics.It is a style of Big Data analysis that the Federal Government had hoped would be embraced by Australians via its controversial E-Health onlineportal, which allows health care providers to share electronic medical records of patients.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 54Twitter CEO Evan Williams makes a presentation about changes to the social network at Twitter headquarters in San Francisco, In the latestonline attack, Twitter says hackers may have gained access to information on 250,000 of its more than 200 million active users.But despite some clear advantages of such a system - lowering the rate of medication errors and misdiagnosis - Australians remain somewhatsceptical of having their private medical information stored online.And they have reason to be.According to a Daily Mail investigation in London, almost 1.8 million patient records were exposed after a series of breaches of the UnitedKingdoms online National Health Service between July 2011 and July 2012.So far, only 73,648 Australians have signed up to have their medical records posted on the Gillard Governments Personally ControlledElectronic Health Record online program - well short of the 500,000 that it hoped would sign up by July this year.In its Big Data Strategy Issues Paper, released last month, the Federal Government believes the use of big data will extend well beyond anyattempts to streamline health services through E-Health. It claims Big Data analytics has the power to revolutionise how governmentdepartments deal with customers, by being able to personalise their services to every individual."Government agencies hold or have access to an ever increasing wealth of data including spatial and location data, as well as data collectedfrom and by citizens," the paper says."Experience suggests that such data can be utilised in ways that have the potential to transform service design and delivery so thatpersonalised and streamlined services, that accurately and specifically meet individuals needs, can be delivered to them in a timely manner."As an example, it zeroes in on a family with two children which is not receiving the welfare payments that are actually justified by their financialsituation. Big Data analysis would pinpoint that error on behalf of the family, and automatically change their payment structure."The opportunity is huge to be able to correlate personal activity with government entitlement to see whether there is a mismatch there, andthen act on it," Mr Riccio said.Experts believe big data analysis could also help employment services by linking people to the right skills development process, or matchingthe skill set of the unemployed to areas where there are skill shortages.It would also prove an invaluable tool for agencies such as Centrelink, Medicare and the Australian Tax Office in cracking down on fraud,experts suggest, as combined data sets find abnormalities in personal details. Already, the ATO cross-references its enormous data storeswith other government departments in a bid to catch tax cheats, to great effect. But it is yet to cross into the grey territory of analysing socialnetworks.In Los Angeles, authorities currently cross-reference internal government data with purchased social network data to identify childcare fraud,while authorities in the UK have strengthened their watch of child sex offenders by using data across multiple departments to understandpeoples movements.But while consumers may welcome companies collating and analysing data to produce more personalised offerings, the Federal Governmentacknowledges that allowing its departments to collect and use personal data will be a hard sell.Even so, its a discussion which at least needs to take place, Mr Stubbs believes."One of the biggest implications out of this is, and I dont want to come down on any particular side of it, that increasingly everybody is goingto have to reconsider how we manage privacy in a fundamentally digitised world," he said."We have a long way to go sorting out what that (privacy) framework should look like, especially around public-private sector informationsharing, and especially around cross-departmental information sharing.""There are many positives and many negatives in using big data, and the positives and negatives are sufficiently complex that there is nosimple answer. The sooner the public sector and the private sector have that conversation and start setting up the ground rules, and findagreement with the public, the faster we can focus on driving better outcomes."He also admits there is an air of inevitability around governments and businesses using personal data - particularly Twitter and Facebook data.These social networks have increasingly moved towards open platforms, and rigorous opt-out privacy settings for those who care deeplyabout protecting their information.But as the common saying in data analytics goes: when a social network is free, you are not a customer. Youre the product.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 55How Coca-Cola found its creative grooveAndrea SophocleousIn 2012, The Coca-Cola Company enjoyed its most-awarded year in history at the Cannes festival, taking home a total 30 Lions. This year, thefirm is also set to be named Cannes Creative Marketer of the Year. Back in 2003, however, it was a different story. Then-CEO Neville Isdelldeclared the company "creatively bankrupt", prompting the beverage giants marketing department to set up its creative excellence discipline ayear later.Cokes VP of global advertising strategy and content excellence, British-born Jonathan Mildenhall, has become the brands most visible andpassionate creativity advocate and was in Sydney recently to espouse the power of creative work at the third annual CIRCUS Festival ofCommercial Creativity.Mildenhall was treated to a rock stars welcome as he took to the stage to deliver the first presentation of the conference. His message ” thatthe most creative brands in the world are the most commercially successful brands ” was popular with an audience drawn from all disciplinesof the marketing and advertising spectrum.Opening with a quote by Harvard University professor John Kao ” "Creativity is the crucial variable in the process of turning knowledge intovalue" ” Mildenhall explained that the most important contribution of creativity to the Coca-Cola business is to create re-consideration."We cant change the formula of our drinks ” woe betide if we try, we tried that in America and it was the most disastrous marketing eventever in the history of human kind ” so well never do that again," Mildenhall said. "Were not like a Nike, were not like a Facebook, were notlike an Apple ” to continue to inspire different generations of consumers with product innovation, we have to base most of our innovation onmarketing communications because thats the leader that we can change and change quite radically."Mildenhall reminded the audience that, for the past 127 years, Coca-Cola has stood for happiness. But just like the pop music icon Madonna,who has remained "at the forefront of her competitive industry for 42 years" by reinterpreting popular trends, Coke has to tap into popularculture to stay relevant."Nobody comes to the Coca-Cola business [and] no agency works on Coca-Cola to try to rethink our strategic position for that brand," he said."But we all have to read popular culture better than any of our competitors to make sure our expression of happiness is relevant to an ever-changing consumer base."The business case for creativityIn the presentation, Mildenhall also covered seven other reasons why Coca-Cola values creativity ” among them because the company believescreativity sparks brand love. "Brand love is very important for us. I always say to any of my agencies, Guys, I want ideas so cool that Id wearthe t-shirt. And I really, really mean that," he said.A more business-focused reason, however, is Cokes belief that creativity looks for new possibilities. For this, Mildenhall offered the exampleof Coca-Cola scientist Ed Hayes, who, for 30 years, worked towards creating the perfect "Coke taste with zero sugar". According toMildenhall, Hayes worked on the Diet Coke launch but was not satisfied with its taste profile, so kept trying until "he managed to crack it" eightyears ago. The result, Coke Zero, is now the Coca-Cola Companys fastest growing multimillion-dollar brand.Creativity also creates "new capabilities", such as Cokes recycling practices, and it "travels" across different markets. "If my work isnttravelling to a minimum of 50 countries, its deemed to have failed," Mildenhall said.He offered the example of Coca-Colas super-charged 2012 London Olympic Games campaign. Four years earlier at the Beijing Olympics, Cokecreated 12 pieces of content and 10 markets around the world activated the brands Beijing presence. By the time the London Olympics rolledaround, Coke created 250 pieces of content, activated in 110 markets."My production budgets hadnt increased but the way that we were spending the production budgets was creating much more content,"Mildenhall said, referring to the massive jump in the amount of content produced. On spreading that content to more markets, he added: "Thatsbecause we got better at telling the stories and putting creativity at the heart of those stories."We had a bigger idea for the London Olympics that we had for the Beijing Olympics. That idea was getting people to really engage with thesound of the London Olympics and that idea was so fertile that it spawned documentaries, live events, a visual identity system, clothing range,out-of-home shopper. The idea was so fertile that every aspect of content that was required for us to activate that in 110 markets was veryeasy to extend."Creativity resets the barMildenhall told the audience that another benefit of creativity is that it "resets the bar". While admitting Coca-Colas instinct is to "codify"successful campaigns in an attempt to repeat that success, Mildenhall argued in favour of imagining better campaigns for the future.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 56"I dont know why we would want to codify something that is already going to be four years old by the time we next activate. Creativity isabout constant innovation, therefore Im less interested about codifying whats been than imagining whats yet to come."Creativity also demands better, he said. "It demands better people, better agency relationships, better conversations, better processes. Weneed to stamp out anything that is getting in the way of really enabling creativity to flourish."Creativity, interestingly and most importantly, is behind every single leap that is made in science, manufacturing and marketing," Mildenhalladded. "So creativity is not just the remit of a few people. Creativity is the responsibility of everybody in any organisation."Next up, content excellenceMildenhall told the audience that Coca-Cola is aiming to move from creative excellence to content excellence."The purpose of content excellence is to create ideas that are so contagious they cannot be controlled," he said, and in the process to earn "adisproportionate share of popular culture" for Coca-Cola Company brands through the stories the company tells and shares with itsconsumers. For content to be "liquid" ” Cokes way of saying viral or contagious ” it must adopt the elements of dynamic storytelling,Mildenhall added.Importantly, technologists will play a growing role in the creation of content, he continued. "So we really need to integrate technologists into ourco-creative teams and having deep and meaningful relationships with technology companies is a business mandate."Overall, Coca-Cola is rethinking the way it works with collaborators and content creators to develop liquid content, Mildenhall said. "The fluidityof all of our ideas means that no one model of content creation can do it all for us. So we need to continue to be very innovative in where weget our content. We can work directly with the creative industries ” the music industry, the film industry. We can work with our brand fans,who have created so much content. We can work directly with creative talent ” photographer and directors. Or we can work with a rock starsingle agency for all of our content needs."The role of the marketing team, he added, is to govern the flow of those ideas and bring out the creativity in everyone they work with.Big data and creativityWhen it comes to the latest buzz phrase in marketing, big data, Mildenhall added its not what data you have but how you use it that will setbrands apart from their competitors."We have pretty much the very same access into the very same data as our biggest competitor," he said. "If youve got creative people, theycan read that data and turn pretty much the same data that everyone else has access to, into really, really valuable insights that are going todrive your business."Drilling into data can unearth "bigger provocations" that lead to transformational actions, Mildenhall said. "Data whisperers ” creative peoplewho can manage that data ” become our new messiahs... For The Coca-Cola Company, all of our creative briefs have to have a big fat fertileidea at their heart. We get to that big fat fertile idea through mining data, through collaborating with internal and external collaborators, andpossibly through engaging with consumers ” not just with qual groups, but regular online dialogue."Read more at http://www.warc.com/Content/ContentViewer.aspx?ID=94bbe6d8-f877-47ea-aeb7-16903c687a65&MasterContentRef=94bbe6d8-f877-47ea-aeb7-16903c687a65#pKeEFKkblA6Plmvb.99How Big Data and Analytics Are Transforming In-Store Experience forRetailersKrishnan Parasuraman | April 9,Last week Google indicated that it would provide same-day delivery service from local retail stores. Joining Amazon, eBay, and a host of otherstartups providing similar services, Google will attempt to eliminate the last compelling differentiator for a traditional brick-and-mortar store -instant gratification. With the ability to browse, order, and now obtain within 24 hours products from the comforts of your home, how does thatimpact traditional retail storefronts? Is this the death knell that we have long been hearing about?Not really. Recent studies have shown that, for a majority of categories, consumers still prefer to use physical stores for both researching andpurchasing products. And since most retailers now employ a multi-channel strategy, physical storefronts have to be an integral part of theoverall shopping journey for their customers. The key is to create a unique shopping experience where customers derive both value andpleasure from visiting physical storefronts. We have seen leading digital e-tailers employ big data analytics to create a superlative experiencefor their users. We are now beginning to see retailers take a leaf from that playbook and emulate similar capabilities in their physical stores.They are:
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 571. Delivering experiences tailored to individual shoppers. Personalization of content based on customer behavior has been the hallmark ofsuccessful digital media e-tailers. Online stores seem to "know" their customers better - correctly identifying them by name, remembering theirlast few purchases, or dynamically customizing the storefront to showcase relevant products. Retailers are now enabling their physicalstorefronts to provide a similar level of personalization.Consider the scenario where you walk into your favorite apparel store. Surveillance cameras mounted on the door immediately detect who youare and instantly beam identifying information to the in-store sales associates. An app on the sales associates tablet then correlates all ofyour shopping characteristics such as loyalty, past purchases, cross-channel preferences, service incidents, and social expression and providesa consolidated view. With this information, a sales associate walks up to you as you are entering the store, greets you by name, and enquiresabout your most recent purchase. This level of personalized attention dramatically alters an individuals in-store shopping experience…and itsnot that far-fetched. Breakthroughs in new facial recognition technology combined with real-time analytics are now enabling brick-and-mortarretail storefronts to provide greater levels of personalization.Almax has created "smart mannequins" that have cameras for eyes and analyze shoppers faces to detect age, gender, ethnicity, and a varietyof other characteristics. A luxury goods retailer is currently piloting their technology to better assess their marketing messages, potentiallydiscover new target groups, and tune their in-store displays.NEC has built a similar system called NeoFace that can alert staff when a loyal customer or a big spender walks into a store.2. Guiding shoppers to discover associated products. Automated guided selling was another aspect of the shopping experience that wasunique to digital channels. We have seen intelligent algorithms make real-time product recommendations based on what was in a customersshopping cart. Retail storefronts are now trying to emulate similar capability by using interactive display units and kiosks that can intelligentlyassess the customer and a product under consideration to make recommendations that enhance the shopping experience.Kraft has partnered with Intel to create an in-store kiosk that leverages video analytics to assist shoppers with product recommendationsbased on their physical characteristics and past purchasing history.IBM helped German retailer METRO boost customer satisfaction by 18 percent with intelligent dressing rooms that would detect the shopperscurrent apparel selection and make appropriate recommendations for accessories.3. Tracking and analyzing shopper behavior across visits. One of the advantages of digital commerce was that all user activity was measurable.One could measure shopper behavior via clicks, page views, time spent per page, and the path traversed from landing to conversion. Thisenabled online retailers to optimize page design, placements, and tailor promotional messages. Big data analytics is now helping retailstorefronts collect and analyze fine-grained shopper visit data.RetailNext, provider of big data analytics solutions for physical storefronts, collects shopper data from a variety of sources such assurveillance video cameras, RFID tags, POS systems, etc. Retailers are currently using this system to collect about 10,000 data points perstore visitor, translating to trillions of analytic data points. Retailers such as American Apparel use this technology to optimize store layouts,fixtures, staffing, and even product offering.Euclid Analytics provides a similar solution, but relies exclusively on Wi-Fi pings emanating from shoppers smartphones to track their in-storelocation. They then analyze this data to measure engagement rates, traffic conversion paths, and identify weak points in the shoppingexperience.The benefits that big data and analytics provide are significant and furthermore blur the divide between online and physical worlds. However,while retailers are applying these practices to optimize in-store experience they must also address privacy and security concerns. Themechanisms employed for data collection in the physical world are different from what we are used to in the digital world and that raisesgenuine concerns among consumers. Physical retailers will have to be transparent in their data collection practices, respect individuals privacyconcerns, and honor customer preferences.Long-Form Branded Videos: Who Has Time To Watch Them?The-Replacer-BThe year was 2008. Bankers were awarding mortgages to any individual whose footwear didnt announce "my current domicileis a mud hut." Lifetimes "How to Look Good Naked" taught an insecure, body-dysmorphic nation how to look good, naked. On the Internet, wereveled in the glory of branded Flash-y sites with embedded video doohickeys. Oh, the techno-pageantry! Clicking on one thing took you toanother thing - which, in turn, revealed either another thing or another another thing. In the end, there were many things.Then brands decided they were cool with video alone, which relegated our little Internet playthings to the scrapheap. Their fate was richlydeserved: heck to Betsy, some took as long as three minutes to navigate, which made them the modern-era equivalent of a paginated book.They disappeared overnight, quaint relics of a less attention-deficit-disordered time.Or at least thats what twitchy Internet people would have you believe. Two new video-centric programs, one from Perrier and one fromActivision, beg the question, "Can consumers still be wowed with pizzazzy technology?" In both cases, the answer is "sure!" Alas, theprograms also beg a second question: "Who has time for this crap?"
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 58Of the two programs, Perrier Secret Place is more involved from a tech perspective and more baffling from a branding one. The game (theadventure? the mission? the proto-experience?) opens outside a seedy dry-cleaning joint, whose proprietress waves us through to a backroom after we hand her what appears to be a steamrollered Monopoly token. The camera lingers on our mysterious wrist tattoo, which isnt aclue… OR IS IT? The guy we meet in the back of the dry-cleaning joint, a carnival barker/cabaret host sort who could use a bath, doesntprovide much information beyond advising us to click on his image. When we do, voilà! We become him and we see us. We have nice hair andan appealingly apportioned skull. Got it? Of course you do.From then on out, every time we click on a character, we become that character and survey the scene from the new characters perspective.And oh, what characters there are: sexy librarians, sexy roller-skaters, sexy guitar players, sexy bartenders, sexy dancerpersons. Each issomehow intertwined with the next, in a way that only those with an endless reservoir of patience will be able to unravel. In the time I spenttrying to figure out what the dickens is going on, I saw the sexy librarian doff her blouse, which prompted the sexy bartender to dunk his facein an icy sink filled with Perrier bottles (all together now: branding!). I witnessed the sexy breakdancer bust several moves of low-gradesexiness. I espied the sexy roller-skater provoke a jealous spat with a sexy interloper, which delighted the sexy objet daffection.What I didnt see was anything that resembled a coherent plot or anything that would help me win whatever I was supposed to be trying to win(sez the directions: "5 clues are hidden at the party. They will help you find the Golden Woman and the secret Perrier bottle. Find them and tryyour chance at winning tickets to one of the worlds craziest parties." Whuh?). Theres an app and additional clues on Facebook. In conclusion, Ido not feel that I received a satisfying return on my temporal investment of 35 minutes, and will spite-drink Canada Dry seltzer instead ofPerrier from now on.I dont have the same problem with Activisions "The Replacers," a higher-concept-than-the-subject-matter-demands teaser campaign for thenext game in the "Call of Duty" series. The bit is that we, the first-person-shooter-playing citizens of Planet Earth, need to free up some timefor "Call of Duty" duty. Enter the Replacers, a pair of dark-suited mercenaries - think The Wolf from Pulp Fiction, minus the focus andcompetence - who will handle everyday responsibilities for gamers as they play away. The trailer has a few inspired bits, especially boyfriendduty (holding handbags outside a waiting room) and a quick weathercasting stint (one replacer ogles the anchor, the other warns of "swampass" conditions in Atlanta). The game clips, which promise "magma" and "vertigo," are similarly right up my juvenile alley.Its the rest of the campaign, especially its aggressive social-media component, that feels extraneous. The site offers a bunch of short clips inwhich one of the Replacers deadpans about brunch attendance, LOL-worthy web videos and more. Theres also a location-based component, inwhich gamers who seek to pass off, say, dog-walking responsibilities can be connected with a Yelp listing for dog-walkers in their area. Itssmartly detailed and well thought-through, but who cares? After clicking on a few clips and being bludgeoned with 74 PLEASE OH PLEASESHARE THIS VIA SOCIAL MEDIA come-ons, boredom kicks in something fierce.So is there still a place for web tchotchkes like "The Replacers" and Perrier Secret Place? I dunno. Maybe-ish? They dont come cheap, interms of time or resources, but theres so much video out there that quickie experiences of this sort can help distinguish a brand or product.Itll be interesting to see how (or whether) such programs translate onto mobile devices in the future.Online Video: Too Popular for RTBs Own Good?by P.J. Bednarski, 29 minutes agoTaking a deeper dive into a new Forrester Consulting research report about Real Time Bidding’s effect on online video makes for someinteresting reading.One takeaway that is a bit ironic: As online video gets more and more popular with viewers and advertisers, the necessity of RTB will becomeobvious. But as online video gets more and more popular, big publishers will become more and more reluctant to offer inventory via RTB.The Forrester Research, commissioned by SpotXChange, was tipped by MediaPost’s Gavin O’Malley a few days ago. The big headline was thatRTB will account for almost one out of every four dollars spent on online video advertising by 2014. That’s awesome.The report points out: ‚Online video is hot, making it RTB’s own worst enemy because premium publishers that sell direct believe that theyneed to manage their inventory themselves to sustain the high CPMs they enjoy. RTB is generally associated with tier-two and -threeinventory at lower eCPMs, giving premium publishers little incentive to participate. Furthermore, premium content owners have been slow toopen up to the idea to sell through indirect channels. However, as RTB becomes defined more by the programmatic buying process rather thanthe pricing model, publishers will enter the fray to reduce friction in the transaction process.‛And along those same lines: ‚Premium publishers still withhold inventory with claims of sold-out status. Even as the quantity of premiumcontent increases, premium publishers of video content remain hesitant to use automated platforms to sell their inventory in a publicenvironment, due to the high eCPMs they are able to sustain for the moment. Those that have tested automated platforms are doing soprimarily in private marketplaces, where they are able to test the impact on pricing, fill rate, and targeting on a limited and controlled basis.‛
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 59So there’s the conundrum. Online video is plentiful so publishers don’t want to offer it in an RTB environment. But as online’s popularity grows,publishers will have to figure it out: There’s too much to take care of.The conclusion, Forrester says, goes like this: ‚[P] ublishers are caught up in the idea that technology-driven sales will lead to less pricingpower and diminished eCPMs. Publishers need to keep their eyes on management tools that allow them to set price floors, choose advertisersdirectly, and get detailed insight into the types of inventory that are in demand. As they test private marketplaces to improve sell-throughrates on these spikes in traffic, they can test the boundaries of the pricing of their content without the risks of putting it on a public exchange.And ad agencies have to come to grips with the fact buyers don’t get how the digital ad space works.Forrester says, ‚What these buyers need to learn from their peers on the trading desks is that transparent inventory, priced high, holds thesame value as inventory priced similarly in a direct deal, or possibly more. While bid-based models may lead to decreased eCPMs on broad-based campaigns, they may wind up driving up the price on high-quality, relevant, and in-demand content.‛All right now get to work.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/197764/online-video-too-popular-for-rtbs-own-good.html?edition=58655#ixzz2Q4yVuTFlOnline Video Targeting -- By Device And Audience -- On Riseby Daisy Whitney, Thursday, April 11, 2013One of the most wonderful and yet most vexing things about the online video business is the plethora of research being released each day.Numbers and stats make the lives of brands and agencies both easier and harder. Which research should you rely on? Which report should youignore?There are a few recent studies that bear a closer look because they point to rising trends that have great impact for both TV and online video.What’s more, these studies dive into the intersection of TV and online video.For starters, Forrester aimed to quantify the real-time bidding market for video earlier this week with a report that said programmatic buyingand real-time bidding will account for about 25% of all online video ad spend in 2014, or $1.14 billion. The study found that real-time bidding forvideo more then doubled from 2011 to 2012, representing the fastest-growing segment of the online video business. Real-time bidding willaccount for nearly half the growth in online video between 2012 and 2014, the report says.Does that mean online video is moving away from being a branding vehicle? No. This means brands are learning to take advantage of one ofthe biggest benefit of Web advertising: more precision in data and analytics. Plus, media buyers like real-time bidding because they can use itto complement more traditional reach campaigns with additional targeting. ‚While advertisers have begun to move a small percentage of TVbudget to online video, those dollars represent a major influx of revenue into this green-field medium. As buyers learn how to fill in the gaps ofcampaigns, they will use RTB to maximize reach, frequency, or sales-lift gaps midflight,‛ Forrester says.If we’re going to hone in on the targeting crossover between online videos, let’s keep in mind that marketers should target by devices as well.In its just-released report, online video tech firm Ooayala found that 47% of all broadcast tablet video viewed was a half hour to an hour long,and that audiences watch twice as much tablet TV on the weekends. Those findings suggest marketers would we wise to layer device targetinginto online video buys.But while targeting online video may be a key underpinning of this sector in the next few years, not all marketers have hopped on the onlinevideo train. Kantar Media studied more than 4,100 brands using online video and national TV, and found that only 12% were using both media. Inaddition, about one-quarter were using online video overall, with 11% using it exclusively. A whopping 77% used national TV exclusively.Restaurants and car makers were most likely to use both, with 43% of the former and 30% of the latter in this category.Cross-Platform Content Requires Cross-Platform UnderstandingFrank Sinton | April 9, 2013 | 0 CommentsTo integrate or not to integrate - that was the question raised by a recent ClickZ article examining the reluctance and confusion brands and adagencies have over publishing to multiple devices. While the piece contained some interesting insights from those struggling with this question,it didnt really dig into the core reason of why this reluctance and confusion exists.From my perspective, there are three underlying problems that need addressing before cross-device integration becomes a mainstream trend.Analytics
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 60Brands and agencies need one dashboard to compare all their activity across devices and platforms. Today, they buy iPad ads from oneagency, online ads from another, and mobile from a third. And all report results differently enough to make it very difficult to compare theresults of each channel against each other. Thats a nightmare for anyone trying to apply an ROI to their strategy. So providing unified metricsthat illustrate the reach of an ad buy across platforms is a must.LogisticsGiven the relative nascent stage of ad creation and distribution on devices like mobile and, even more so, tablets, brands tend to deal withdifferent groups of people with "expertise" in each vertical. Even those fortunate enough to employ one agency for all needs still deal withdifferent people at that agency for each different channel. Couple that with the tendency for brands themselves to have people internally witha similar dispersed focus on one area or the other. This makes for a significant barrier to entry, as people familiar with mobile gravitate tomobile solutions, while those focused on tablet will gravitate to tablet strategies.TechnologyToday, there are different standards for different devices. For instance, Apples iOS platform has a cookies policy that states one cant track auser across platforms, like you can online. That inhibits behavioral targeting. Its just one of many technical restrictions that serve more tofragment than unify the market that we hope one day will be resolved.The common thread among all these issues is fragmentation, which creates silos of familiarity. Brands and agencies familiar with one silo willremain in their comfort zone until they can better understand both how other channels work and how they relate to their area of focus. Untilthese issues are fixed, brands and agencies will continue to spend their time on money primarily on the formats they understand - thosefamiliar with TV will continue to make TV buys; those into mobile will keep on making mobile buys; and so on. People are afraid of what theydont understand. Once mobile, tablet, online, and traditional media can be accessed, measured, and deployed on a cross-platform basis, eachchannel will be easier to understand, and this fear will go away.The good news is that we can expect to see dramatically greater interest in all three areas this year. I believe 2013 will be the year of cross-platform integration. Or at least the start of it (hey, each of the last 10 years was dubbed the "year of mobile" until it finally happened lastyear). Googles TrueView platform is a start. And Im sure others will soon follow.Welcome to the Post-Ad-Tech EraTime to End the Bickering Over Metrics and Let Tech Shape Marketings FutureBy:Bill DemasPublished: April 10, 2013While many in digital media continue to explain what ad tech is and does, its time for the conversation to evolve beyond this to the realbenefits that enterprise technology can bring to a marketers strategy. Big data and programmatic advertising have become embedded in theexecution of mainstream advertisers and technology. Were on the CMOs radar screen, so lets make sure that the education and conversationevolve consistently with the rapid innovation in the space.This transformation has never been more critical. Technology that drives marketing is transforming advertising as we know it. Forecaster IDCestimates that worldwide RTB-based spending (real-time bidding) will rise to $13.9 billion and the big-data market will grow to $23.8 billion in2016.It is imperative that we as industry leaders help foster the growth and maturity of the relationship between enterprise technology andmarketing leaders. Heres how:Automation is great, but it contributes to business results only when paired with a marketers intelligence and intuition. Data can and shouldinform key decisions, but the human element is crucial to establishing emotional bonds and preference between brand and consumer. Look atwhat Netflix has done with data to create the political drama series "House of Cards," leveraging its understanding of customer viewing habitsand preferences to drive content creation, to great effect Technology can provide the insights that help marketers make better decisions. Itfrees up marketers to focus on interpreting results, refining strategy and ensuring business success.Think audience -- not media channel -- first. Marketers who truly want to understand consumers need to use data from every channel andplatform to create a complete picture of their most valuable customers. Then they can design specific campaigns based on how each differentsegment interacts with the brand.The walls have come down. Multi-touch attribution and cross-channel campaigns are here. Companies that tell single-media-channel stories aredoing a disservice to the data-driven marketer. The notion of thinking in silos is outmoded, as is having separate technology partners for video,mobile, social, display, et al.The imaginary C-suite battle between technology and marketing is outdated. As product and service providers, we must stop using this analogywhen we speak to customers. The CIO and the CMO are both leaders charged with delivering ROI to their business. Marketing is becomingmore IT-like and IT is embracing marketing as a strategic partner. Were seeing more companies with a Chief Marketing Technology Officer,
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 61where all of these elements are coming together. Whatever you call it, though, its an acknowledgement that new kinds of bridges are beingbuilt every day.Marketers have embraced technology. But they are demanding transparency, clarity and ROI, and instead what they often get from the industryis jargon and bickering over metrics and strategies. Its time we move beyond the ad-tech swordfight and get to a mature position whereenterprise technology shapes the future of marketing.Content Marketing: Its Not About Shock, but Good StorytellingWhat Expert Knowledge Does Your Brand Have That Customers Could Use?By:Alexander JutkowitzPublished: April 09, 2013Want your message to cut through the noise? You have to be doing content marketing -- and doing it right.Content marketing is not a shallow advertisement, a blatant self-promotion or an attempt to trick readers. First and foremost, it has to beabout great content. Its writing a story that people want to e-mail a friend, or unearthing a fascinating piece of information buried in anorganizations little-read white paper. Its a stunning infographic that breaks down a complex idea or drives home a jaw-dropping statistic thatyour organization happens to know. Its a video interview featuring an expert who gives honest answers to interesting questions.A content marketer has to think like a journalist about crafting a narrative and providing either a thought-provoking idea or accurate, timelyinformation that helps people to better navigate the world. But like a public-relations professional, he or she has to think strategically about theorganizations larger goals and the audience it wants to reach. Like an advertiser, the successful content marketer has to know how to tellthese stories visually and tap an emotional vein.Lincoln Motor Co. is an example of a brand that gets it. The average Lincoln buyer is older than the buyers of any other luxury car brand,including Cadillac, according to research published last year by Polk, the automotive market research firm. The company understandably wantsto introduce itself to sophisticated younger drivers. But rather than focusing only on its own rebranding, Lincoln has been exploring the veryconcept of reimagining tradition through content that is interesting enough to grab eyeballs on its own merit. The companys website featuresstories about a New York City street photographer who captures the urban landscape as his bicycle tires might see it, an artisan who restoresstring instruments and innovations in e-book publishing.But the highlight of the Hello, Again campaign came when the company commissioned Beck to remake David Bowies classic album, "Sound andVision," in a live performance with more than 160 musicians. A series of 360-degree camera shots and microphones brought the theater hometo online viewers. The performance was an apt move for Lincoln because both the impressive aesthetics and the celebrity firepower spoke tothe sort of energetic, youthful luxury that would appeal to the under-60 crowd.Nokia Music is also doing stunning work. In collaboration with the Sundance Film Festival and production company Somesuch & Co., thecompany has created a series of mini-documentaries on the music scenes in several American cities. The purpose of the New American Noisefilms is to promote Nokia Musics music-streaming service, which offers curated playlists available on the companys smartphones. How betterto tell audiences that Nokias got the goods on music than straight-from-the-streets documentaries?Authenticity is the quality that makes many worthy brands stumble when they create content, but the fearlessness of these documentariesmakes Nokias videos shine. In Atlanta, the film crew takes viewers inside the clubs that determine which up-and-coming rappers make it big. InNew Orleans, they venture into the gay clubs where bounce music originated. The ethereal vibe of Portlands indie scene and the portrayal of athriving New York underground hip-hop scene that focuses on storytelling also ring true. The images in some videos can be explicit, and thelanguage is raw and uncensored. But the videos are beautifully produced, and they tell a true story about the diverse musical styles that giveeach city a soundscape as unique as its skyline.These brands have proven that the key to successful content marketing is to stop thinking about how to shock your audience into payingattention. Instead, start thinking about what they might want to know. Whether youre into fashion or finance, what could your organizationshare that might make people come back day after day?How are people doing it wrong? You only need to visit the Condescending Corporate Brand page on Facebook to see how irksome audiencesfind insincere, lazy marketing ploys. An Applebees franchise asking fans to weigh in on what color they would like the companys French friesto be ” with a helpful display of paint chips for inspiration ” makes the grade. Like a perfunctory message on a birthday card, "engagement"like this tells people a brand doesnt think highly enough of them to spend much time thinking about what to say. Restaurant chains have lots ofknowledge that people might find fascinating. Why waste time with inane questions?Theres no question that doing this right is more expensive and time-consuming than sending a press release or tweeting. If brands want tobecome media platforms, they have to accept some of the costs of being a publisher. Many of them are. A recent survey of marketers basedlargely in the United Kingdom and Europe showed that 70 percent would increase their content budgets this year.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 62The knowledge economy continues to rocket forward. People actively seek out things that entertain them or keep them a step ahead inwhatever field interests them, but they have no time for halfhearted efforts. If youre going to have a content-marketing strategy, unlock whatyour organization knows thats worth sharing with the world.Figure out what your most interesting stories are, and tell them wellNo Time to Waste: 6 Mobile MustsAnna Bager | April 10, 2013It is finally crystal clear that mobile is here to stay. And, in keeping, we see a world in which consumers will be using mobile to executive themajority of their daily activities, if they arent already. However, even with all of the buzz surrounding mobile, most sellers and buyers seemsomewhat unclear about how they can make money from it.What I think is the first priority - no matter who you are - is dipping your toe in. You cant wait for the mobile ecosystem to simplify itself. Toomany agencies and marketers are taking that stance. While we can work together to improve the workflow, the number of devices andplatforms will continue to evolve and proliferate. The longer you wait, the more complicated things will get. The time to take action is now.In that vein, I thought Id offer up a few suggestions and tips on how to launch a successful mobile campaign, focusing on what a marketerneeds to think about when it comes to mobile.Avoid buzzwords in your request for proposal (RFP). When drafting up an RFP dont use every buzzword in the industry. It wont make yousound smarter and it makes it more confusing for your media provider to fulfill. It fogs up your true intent, and you need to be specific at alltimes. Do you have Foursquare and Yelp feeds dynamically updating in your rich media creative? Great, say that instead of the fact that youwill be "leveraging social media to enhance your creative relevance." It is important for media providers to be clear that you want to target yourcampaign to the right properties and audience to meet your campaign needs.Hyper-local isnt always the best strategy. Hyper-local is probably one of the most used words when it comes to talking about mobile. It istrue that users are walking around with a device in their pocket at all times, often providing you with their precise location. But, keep in mindthat while a large portion of your audience has that device with them, they may not be opting in to allowing their precise location to be passedalong to all their apps. Even if they are opted in, are you missing scale and reach? How many users are in that three-mile radius from yourstore and using their smartphone during your one-week promotional campaign? Going with a bigger local target and undertaking creativeoptimization may be a better option to meet your campaign goals.Dont get caught up in all the fragmentation. It is true that there are a lot of differences that emerge dependent upon operating system,device model, app developer to app developer, etc. However, the mobile industry has been advancing rapidly to meet these challenges tocreate a robust marketing channel. With so many mobile-focused companies out there mastering the fragmented marketplace, many have foundways to handle different sized screens and use MRAID to improve the right media experiences. Publishers know their apps and how theybehave on different devices, so it is important to work with them and give them enough quality assurance (QA) time before the launch of acampaign.Dont expect the world from a test campaign. Right now, many advertisers are testing the mobile waters. They arent clear on how the mobilechannel will enhance their overall goals. As a result, they are running small test campaigns to try different strategies all at once. That wontwork. Use test campaigns to test out specific goals and learn about your audience.Be clear about your goal. What is the real objective of your campaign? Are you driving people to a store? Getting them to sign up forsomething? Or are you seeking brand awareness? Being clear about what your goal is will help publishers and other media providers fulfill yourIO and produce a campaign that is successful across the board, instead of just meeting impression goals.Mobilize your website. This is where a great number of users will first see your site. Therefore, your mobile presence is where initialperceptions and opinions will be formed and, if played correctly, it is also where a lot of business will be made. If you dont have a siteoptimized for mobile, your customers may look elsewhere.This Thursday, the Interactive Advertising Bureau and its Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence will again host the annual IAB MobileMarketplace conference and I foresee this event breaking new ground and offering up keen insights that are needed to drive mobile forwardfor consumers, agencies, marketers, and technology vendors alike. Throughout the day, we will bring industry leaders together to tackle mobilefrom all angles - and also challenge the mobile definition, as we know it.This event is one of many things that the IAB is doing to try and answer the issues Ive noted above. And, where a meaningful guideline oranswer does not exist, we will try to find or develop a solution.Join us on Thursday, stay tuned, and maybe this list will help in the meantime.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 63Convergence Analytics Delivers New Paradigm for Holistic Insights IntoCustomer BehaviorPelin Thorogood | April 10, 2013 | 0 CommentsCloud-based applications give businesses routine access to vast volumes and a variety of data literally at their fingertips. However, greateraccessibility to data has, unfortunately, not always yielded greater usability or value. Despite the oceans of data furnished by a flotilla ofvendors at their disposal, deciphering return on marketing investment (ROMI) still remains that elusive Holy Grail of measurement for todaysmarketers.A recent survey by Black Ink (a division of the marketing firm Winsper) revealed that more than three-quarters of respondents who believe ROIis "very important" cited marketing data integration as a primary challenge to measuring it. This is consistent with a Forrester Research findingthat 86 percent of marketing decision-makers surveyed believe successfully integrating multiple channels under a single, integrated marketingstrategy is critical to long-term success.Thats one reason for the high interest in a groundbreaking research report, "Convergence Analytics: Digital Measurement in Transition" fromEfectyv and ClickZ. Released at the recent SES New York conference, the report from authors Andrew Edwards and Rand Schulman, Efectyvfounders, described a new paradigm in marketing defined as: "everybody is measuring everything - or at least they want to." How - andwhether - some of these measurements should be handled is of course fodder for much debate.The report defines convergence analytics as the "confluence of digital marketing, big data, cloud computing, data connectors and sophisticatedpresentation-layer capabilities." As the report aptly highlights, there also is a brisk growth of technologies and vendors in the analytics spacewith a confusing array of features, functions, and capabilities.The end-goal of convergence analytics, of course, is to give marketers a holistic view of customer behavior in the context of financial, market,and other related information. Thats exactly why I really like how the Efectyv team defined the convergence analytics stack as extract,transform, and load (the basis of all traditional business intelligence), augmented by analyze, visualize, and - last but not least - predict. Themarketing team needs tools that connect to and normalize data from vendors, including social media stats, web metrics, call center details,CRM data, results from marketing campaigns, and third-party research, such as financial or market data. Visualization tools add a further layerby reporting data on these customer touch points in various types of dashboards. However, dashboards alone do not deliver the insightsneeded to drive marketing decisions. In a single word, they are not all that actionable because dashboards only capture data on the state of thesystem and often fail to describe the system itself and its potential levers.Here are some basic questions to ask in evaluating critical analytics capabilities in this evolving world of convergence analytics:Can you ask the data ad hoc questions? An analytics platform should provide more than dashboard reporting. Ad hoc data discovery is keyto uncovering new trends and hidden correlations. The report stresses, "It is safe to say that without an action plan based on discovery, theresnot much reason to engage in measurement at all." Too true! After all, you need to be able to analyze and ask any question of the combinedmultichannel data in real time, including ones that enable you to identify how consumers are likely to respond to a variety of paid-, owned-, andearned-media efforts.Will the tools give you predictive capabilities? Marketing teams need to be able to analyze the data for patterns and correlations todetermine predictors-to-purchase by buyer segment. These capabilities are fundamental to right-time marketing - microtargeting the rightconsumer segments at the right time with the right offers. Predictive analytics is also essential in identifying what the future holds if marketingactivities remain as is, as well as optimizing the marketing mix to deliver the desired future.How can you get the most out of your analytics platform? It is still all about people, process, and platform. Professional services remain akey ingredient for businesses to leverage the full power of these emerging technology platforms. To gain the full measure of benefits that ananalytics platform can provide, you need to configure and integrate analytics tools with marketing processes and business needs.Implementation of data connections, analysis, reporting, and predictive modeling all need to relate to your specific business and marketinggoals, and not be based on a generic model. As co-author Andrew Edwards stresses "having a method for deploying convergence analyticsapplications, and taking action on the data, is as important as having the tools themselves."Theres no question that technology advances and the growth of data are moving at lightning speed. Marketing teams now have an evengreater requirement to showcase their analytics prowess in the form of better engagement with buyers across all marketing channels. So, whatwill it take to discover truly actionable insights that deliver predictable top-line and bottom-line results? As I watch the tools and processescontinue to evolve, convergence analytics appears to be a pretty good place to start.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 64Survey: 90% Of Customers Say Buying Decisions Are Influenced ByOnline ReviewsPublished on April 9, 2013Written by: Amy GesenhuesAccording to a new survey conducted by Dimensional Research, an overwhelming 90 percent of respondents who recalled reading onlinereviews claimed that positive online reviews influenced buying decisions, while 86 percent said buying decisions were influenced by negativeonline reviews.The survey, sponsored by Zendesk in the early part of 2013, included responses from 1,046 participants. Respondents had to be in the UnitedStates, and had to have experienced a recent customer service issue with a midsized company, either as a consumer or in a business context.Approximately two-thirds of the 1,046 respondents reported reading online reviews. While Facebook was the leading resource for positivereviews, the most common place to find negative reviews were online review sites.When asked what made a customer service interaction bad, 72 percent of the respondents blamed having to explain a problem to multiplepeople, while only 51 percent blamed a bad customer service interaction on the problem not being resolved.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 65Not only are customers most frustrated with the way customer service issues are handled, 58 percent said they were more likely to sharecustomer service experiences today than they were five years ago, with more and more people sharing experiences on social networking sitesand writing online reviews.Of the respondents who shared negative experiences, 45 percent used social media and 35 percent shared via online review sites.When respondents were segmented, 100 percent of the participants who earned $150K or more a year, said they shared bad customer serviceinteractions with others.B2B companies were more likely to benefit from customers who had a good customer service interaction with 62 percent of respondentssaying they purchased more products or services from a B2B company following a positive customer service experience. Only 42 percent ofpositive B2C customer service interactions resulted in customers buying more products or services.Key findings of the study illustrated that customer service not only affects revenue, but has a long lasting impact, with customer serviceranking as the No. 1 factor influencing how much a consumer trusts a company.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 66The overall takeaway from the survey is that midsized companies create better customer experiences when they react quickly to a customerservice issue.Because a company’s social media channels and website are managed most often by marketing, the study offers strong evidence toward theimportance of customer service working hand-in-hand with marketing to respond quickly to online reviews and addressing customer concernsthat are delivered via a company’s site and social media channels like Facebook and Twitter.More + More Devices = More Multitaskingby Aaron Baar, Yesterday, 2:57 PMThe proliferation of media-able devices in our households (PCs, smartphones, tablets) is leading to a division of our attention when it comes totraditional television viewing and programming.According to Accenture’s third annual ‚Video Over Internet Consumer Survey,‛ 90% of consumers watch at least some video content over theInternet. Not only are they watching more content over the Internet, but when it comes to watching traditional television, attention isincreasingly more divided. According to the results, 77% of respondents said they use their computer or laptop while watching TV -- up 16%from last year.‚It’s impressive how much multitasking is increasing,‛ Francesco Venturini, broadcast lead for Accenture’s media and entertainment group, tellsMarketing Daily. ‚Many people [who are] in front of TV are doing something else. Their expectations from traditional linear TV [programmingand content] are decreasing.‛At the same time, the tablet is becoming the go-to device for multitasking while watching television. According to the survey, 44% ofconsumers used their tablets for multitasking (up from 33% last year). Significantly, 14% of consumers used their tablets to search for contentand engage in social media directly related to the television program they were watching.The findings present an opportunity for broadcast and cable networks to interact with consumers much more readily and immediately than theyhave in the past, Venturini says. ‚Marketers need to understand [these behaviors] because that second device opens up more and newmonetization models,‛ Venturini says. ‚[The tablet is] a perfect tool to engage the consumer with new activities which they cannot do on TV,such as social media.‛Among devices, the PC/laptop is still the top device used for these ‚over-the-top‛ (OTT) services with 65% of respondents using them towatch video content (up from 59% last year). About a third (31%) said they did the same on a mobile phone (up from 24%), while 22% saidthey used a tablet (up from 14%). Tablets and PCs are the preferred devices to watch longer-form video (such as movies or TV shows),according to the survey.When it comes to accessing these OTT services, the local providers are making inroads against larger, national brands (such as Netflix andYouTube) in providing on-demand services. According to the survey, the number of consumers using local online video providers and
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 67broadcasters rose to 40% this year, compared with 37% in 2012. Moreover, consumer trust in these local providers is increasing. When askedwho they trusted most to offer video over the Internet to their traditional TV screens, more than half (53%) said their traditional TV broadcastprovider, up from 32% last year.‚Broadcasters are becoming the most-trusted providers for on-demand services,‛ Venturini says. ‚This is a reflection of the investments thebroadcasters have made in the last [few] years in launching on-demand services. For the last 10 years they were very complacent in theirbusiness models. [The payoff on recent investment] is a very encouraging sign for most of the broadcasters.‛Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/197669/more-more-devices-more-multitasking.html?edition=58647#ixzz2Q4Hc1GfaWatchmaker Asks Appeals Court To Revive Case Against Amazonby Wendy Davis, Yesterday, 5:56 PMWatch manufacturer Multi Time Machine is asking a federal appellate court to rule that Amazon infringes trademark with its internal searchengine.Multi Time sells watches for up to $2,000 under the names MTM Special Ops‛ and ‚MTM Military Ops.‛ The company -- which doesnt sellmerchandise on Amazon -- alleges that users who search for one of its brand names on Amazons site are shown ads for watches made byother rivals.‚This constitutes an infringement,‛ Multi Time Machine argues in its 2011 complaint against Amazon. The watchmaker adds that Amazon ismisleading consumers into thinking that theyre viewing ads for Multi Time products.Amazon has countered that the case should be dismissed because ‚no reasonable fact finder could conclude that a consumer is likely to beconfused over the source of clearly identified products.‛In February, U.S. District Court Judge Dean Pregerson in the Central District of California granted Amazon summary judgment. Pregerson heldthat Multi Time Machine didnt prove that Amazons search results were likely to confuse consumers.He noted in a 23-page decision that the watch maker ‚did not conduct a study to determine whether users of Amazon are likely to beconfused as to source.‛ Without that type of study, the company didnt show that consumers are confused about whether theyre viewing adsfor Multi Time watches or those of its competitors.Multi Time has now filed an appeal with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The ruling in the case could ultimately affect practices at allcompanies that operate search engines.Google has been accused repeatedly of infringing trademark by allowing companies to use their rivals brand names to trigger search ads. Todate, no court has ruled that doing so automatically infringes trademark.But Google recently suffered a setback when the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a trademark infringement lawsuit by Rosetta Stonewas prematurely dismissed. In that case, Rosetta Stone alleged that its trademark was being used by counterfeiters, who duped consumersinto purchasing fake software.U.S. District Court Judge Gerald Bruce Lee in Alexandria, Va. dismissed the case before trial, but the 4th Circuit ruled that Rosetta Stone hadpresented enough evidence to justify a trial. Google and Rosetta Stone later reached a settlement.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/197710/watchmaker-asks-appeals-court-to-revive-case-again.html?edition=58644#ixzz2Q4HzxxSXShoppers In Buying Mode More Receptive To Online Adsby Gavin OMalley, Yesterday, 5:15 PMA woman who has recently been researching a family vacation is most receptive to ads for cruises when she is shopping online for, well,anything else.That (arguably intuitive) finding is one of the first from Aisle A -- the media solutions and audience-targeting division launched by comparison-shopping site Shopzilla in February.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 68The hypothetical woman ‚is in an active buying mind-set when she is buying [for example] clothes online for her kids, and therefore morereceptive to an ad for a family cruise,‛ according to Craig Teich, vice president and General Manager of Aisle A.‚Similarly, an avid moviegoer is more receptive to a trailer for the next action film when he is shopping for a new TV,‛ Tech said.After surveying over 4,500 online shoppers, Aisle A found that 85% agreed with this statement: ‚When shopping online, I’m receptive to onlineads for products or services that I am currently considering buying.‛A more modest 62% of respondents agreed with this statement: ‚When shopping online, I’m receptive to additional products or services thatare relevant to me (even if I’m not currently considering buying them) and targeted to my interests and buying preferences.‛Broken down demographically, 69% of Generation Y (which Aisle A defines as consumers under 30) respondents agree with the laststatement, while 53% of seniors (or consumers over 65) agreed.Aisle A also found that the type of site and activity (gaming, reading, shopping) significantly impacts ad receptivity, as survey respondents saidthey are most likely to be receptive to ads on shopping sites (57%); followed by email sites (47%); information/news/blogs (25%); social-media sites (22%); video sites (4%); and gaming sites (3%).‚With credit cards in hand, the path to purchase during online shopping is a lean forward environment where people are more open to ads forproducts targeted to them,‛ Tech said. ‚A shopping environment presents valuable opportunities for advertisers in all categories becausethey’re reaching active buyers.‛‚This study also highlights that retailers or publishers at the bottom of the sales funnel are sitting on valuable, engaged audiences foradvertisers,‛ Tech added.Aisle A’s survey was conducted via the Bizrate Insights survey platform and offered to online buyers immediately after purchasing fromBizrate’s network of retailers in the U.S. and Canada.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/197709/shoppers-in-buying-mode-more-receptive-to-online-a.html?edition=58644#ixzz2Q4ILQb1X
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  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 70"The Medium is the Message"Canadian-born Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) was a philospher of communication theory, who some have suggested first floated the phrase -"print is dead" - but thats not exactly what he said. What he did say (in the early 1960s!) was that the print culture would die with the adventof electronic media. He predicted that electronic media would foster "electronic interdependence," moving society toward a collective "tribalbase" or global village-type culture."Print is the technology of individualism. If men decided to modify this visual technology by an electronic technology, individualism would also bemodifed." - Marshall McLuhan, The Gutenberg Galaxy (1962)The often overindulged, overstated misnomer that "print is dead" could not be more misunderstood. The number of magazines has grown overthe past decade according to the Magazine Publishers of America. Why do they continue to grow? McLuhan suggested that "the medium is themessage," arguing that the way communication is delivered is more important than the communication itself. Print is still the medium choice ofmillions to receive messages.McLuhan theorized that every medium created a symbiotic relationship with the end user and that content, or the message, is influenced by themedium. In other words, news stories delivered on television by anchors influenced the audience much differently than the same contentdelivered via a newspaper, radio or magazine.The question is: "Is print culture, the culture of individualism really dead and has it been replaced by a collective identity?"Lucro da Globo cresce 36% em 2012Receita líquida da empresa chegou a R$ 12,59 bi, considerando veiculação publicitária e circulação, serviços digitais e outrosHow People Use Facebook On SmartphonesJay Yarow | Mar. 27, 2013, 5:44 PM | 5,734 | 2IDC conducted a survey in conjunction with Facebook to find out how people are using smartphones. It surveyed 4,446 people aged 18-44 whouse iPhones or Android-based phones. In this chart you can see how people are using Facebook on smartphones.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 71Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-facebook-usage-on-smartphones-2013-3#ixzz2PnwzqSTo15 Types of Email Marketing Tests You Should Be DoingJeanne Jennings | April 1, 2013I was recently asked to develop a "testing protocol" for a client. The deliverable was a worksheet that would document tests for a particularsend, but they wanted it to do more than just that. They wanted it to educate on the value of testing and spur these groups within theirorganization to truly leverage testing to their advantage.Not a simple task.One of my observations, both with this client (who Ive been working with for more than two years) and with other clients, is the focus onsubject line testing. My personal goal, with this project and in general, is to get email marketers to go beyond just testing subject lines and lookat other elements that might improve response.There are a lot of "100+ things to test in email" lists out there. But these leave me a bit flat. Many of the items they list are specific to anindustry or type of email, and many arent things that will normally drive large increases in response.So heres my much-less-impressive sounding list of 15 types of email tests you can do, along with some narration on my personal favorites andleast favorites. The list is roughly organized from what generally provides the most to least value in terms of increased performance for thelong term.1. Lists2. Landing page elements (which could spur another list of 15 or more)3. Completely new creative (multiple elements)4. Preview pane view5. Customization (targeted content)
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 726. Offer/offer copy/placement7. Call-to-action copy/placement8. General wireframe/layout9. General copy10. Personalization (data merge)11. Subject line12. From line13. Design (fonts/colors/images)14. Time of the send15. Day of the sendList testing tops my list of 15, because if you arent reaching the right audience it doesnt really matter what content the email carries. This is abroad category - you can test to indentify segments of your house list, which are more and less responsive to certain offers, and use thisknowledge to boost your revenue per email sent by targeting offers. See my recent case study on this.You can also mail to third-party rental lists to not only boost your immediate performance but also grow your own house list with qualifiednames via opt-in. Infusing your house list with qualified names on an ongoing basis is a key to success in email. According toMarketingSherpas 2013 Email Marketing Benchmark Survey, only 17 percent of marketers have email lists that are growing rapidly. Another 50percent say their lists are growing slowly, and a third of respondents are seeing neutral to negative growth.Landing page elements, which you can see could have a list of 15 or more elements of its own, is my second favorite thing to test. Emailconversions tend to happen on landing pages, microsites, and web-based conversion funnels. Its important to keep readers engaged andmoving toward the end goal of your email once they click through. Even a small boost in performance here, getting 5 percent or fewer ofvisitors to convert, can have a large impact on your bottom line. The results of many landing page tests you do can also be applied for futurecampaigns, in both email and other channels, producing true long-term value for the money spent.Now on to some of the items at the bottom of my list.Im not a big fan of day and time send tests, nor do I pay much attention to those reports released periodically that tell you the best day andtime to send email. Ive found common sense to be the best guide here. For B2B email, I shoot to have it arrive during the business day basedon the time zone of the recipients. For B2C email, I set send day and time based on the audience and when I imagine theyll have a few minutesto read it, which is typically late afternoon/evening or weekend days. Ive done day and time testing for clients, but assuming they are startingwith a "common sense" control time for their audience, I havent seen huge, sustainable lifts.The same is true for design, which I consider fonts, colors, and images. This is not to be confused with wireframes/layouts, which I have muchhigher on the list. I love good email design; but I have also found that as long as common sense is your guide, the fonts, colors, and specificimages used dont tend to have a large impact on response. For me, common sense design is about using readable fonts and colors and imagesthat compel readers to the action you want them to take. Testing magenta instead of maroon as the accent color on the email isnt somethingthat typically provides you a large lift.A challenge to readers: when you plan your next email test, start from the top (not the bottom) of my list of 15 and choose a type of test thatyouve never done before. Then build the test, see how it does, and let me know!Until next time,JeanneReport: Many TV Stations To Add Online Video To Advertising Mixby Daisy Whitney, Thursday, April 4, 2013TV stations have traditionally centered their tune-in efforts on-air. But with consumer habits shifting to an online world, broadcast tune-instrategies are moving in that direction too. That’s the conclusion of a white paper from video marketing and analytics platform Mixpo. Thecompany surveyed local broadcasters around the country to assess how they use all types of online advertising to drive viewership, and theresult is that nearly half will be upping their online ad spend this year, with many leaning more on online video.Previously, stations that used online advertising had mostly relied on display ads, but now they’re adding online video to the mix. On the onehand, it’s about time. On the other hand, this is also an important step forward in the online video business, which is still new. Just a few yearsago, the rallying cry around online video centered on scale and standards. Now the focus is on the move to broad ubiquity and practical use ofonline video for all sorts of marketing such as product videos, pre-rolls and now tune-in.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 73Mixpo found that stations spend about 18% of their tune-in budget online, and that 42% of stations plan to increase their online tune-inadvertising budget in 2013. Diving deeper, about 85% of stations plan to use online video to market their shows this year. About 57% ofstations in the top 10 DMAs say they’ll boost their tune-in budget this year, with much of the increases coming from video. ‚Today’s audiencesare not only online, but are increasingly spending a large portion of their online time watching video. TV broadcasters are uniquely positioned totake advantage of this shift and reach viewers with online video advertising,‛ the report said. ‚TV marketers already have engaging videocontent, daily topicals, social media strategies, promotions, co-op programs, and skilled creative resources at their disposal.‛Many smaller stations are also relying more on online video. Stations in large markets on average spend 15% of their tune-in advertising budgetonline, while in small markets, the average is 24%. Local broadcasters say they use online and digital video ads because such ads ‚extend thereach and frequency of their on-air promotions.‛ In addition, they also said they rely on online advertising to effectively target viewers bydemography and geography.One of the reasons stations are just starting to explore online video is that, frankly, TV stations have never been at the cutting edge ofmarketing. Only 20% of survey respondents said their stations had a "reasonably effective program in place‛ for online advertising. However,46% said they are actively growing their capabilities and another 23% have rated online advertising as a ‚new strategic area of emphasis.‛If stations are just beginning to use online video for tune-in, Mixpo advises them to start with their on-air spots and reuse them online, to leadwith daily topics to drive spikes in viewership, and to pivot off popular prime-time shows in video ads, with perhaps a split-start screenshowing an ad for a popular network show alongside a topical for the nightly news. Don’t forget to add localized info such as call letters, andbe aware that consumers might view the tune-in ad on a mobile screen, so make sure it’s optimized for mobile.Data Is The Way To Go -- Except When Its NotBy Kaila ColbinFriday, April 5, 2013In last week’s column, I discussed what I called the disturbing dogma of social media. The idea provoked some strong responses (thank you! I’malways grateful for feedback). Traci Browne pointed out that I had used a narrow definition of social media, while others got into a reasonablyheated discussion of its pros and cons.The argument might have seemed like an ordinary blog post comment thread, but to me there was a meta-layer to it, one about the nature ofdiscussion and the nature of attachment.I recently heard again a familiar aphorism: ‚Data settles arguments.‛ It’s a phrase commonly used by proponents of A/B testing and iterativedevelopment. Its premise is simple: There is little to be gained from debating subjective aesthetic positions on this style or that one, fromallowing temperatures to elevate in the name of being ‚right‛ about which cover picture we should use. We should, rather, put our options tothe test -- and may the better version win, in a kind of Darwinian ‚survival of the fittest design.‛Allowing data to settle arguments implies releasing attachments to opinions and assumptions. The Buddhists would be proud: the second oftheir Four Noble Truths is that the origin of all suffering is attachment. Openness to data also implies approaching debates with a differentmindset, focused on a different outcome. As Joseph Joubert said, ‚The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but progress.‛On Monday, my MediaPost colleague Steve Smith posted a column about an Instagram campaign run by French mobile provider M6. Steve wasimpressed with the campaign’s social impact, but also included some statistics: ‚[T]he company saw 4.6 times more comments on its posts,over 95% of which were positive. And it saw 12 times more stories generated on its page with an increase of over 1400% in sharing. Itcalculated its cost per view at €0.14.‛Relative to M6’s baseline, the campaign was a clear success. But it’s up to them and their metrics whether €0.14 is a success or not. How manyof those views turn into leads? How many of those leads convert? How long does a customer remain a customer, and, therefore, what is thetotal lifetime value of a conversion? In the end, company math is simple: if the cost to acquire a customer is less than their lifetime value, youstay alive. If it’s not, you don’t.Coming back to the Buddhists: being notoriously difficult to pin down, they would probably equally frown on attachment to data. Steve Jobs,whose eclectic background famously included calligraphy studies, would likely concur, and certainly data cannot settle an argument aboutwhether your design will stir the soul. The pyramids at Giza were not the product of A/B iterations; Picasso did not beta test his work. Butwhile Picasso was best known for Cubism, his technical skill and ability to faithfully reproduce the outside world show clearly that his moreabstract work is the result of conscious choice, not random scribblings.At the risk of sounding repetitive of last week’s message, the important thing here is, in fact, that conscious choice: to be aware of when torely on data and when to trust your instinct, and to be the one deciding between the two.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 74Let data settle arguments, when appropriate. Let go of attachment to opinions and assumptions, if you need to. But don’t forget to stir thesoul.How To Handle Marketings New Video Challengeby Neil Perry, Friday, April 5, 2013It’s a dilemma. Marketers today are faced with a true challenge in dealing with the ever-increasing demand for video for social channels, whilethey are still being held to the highest levels of production standards for any work that represents their brand.These two conflicts, the battle for high standards offset by the need for more and more video, are creating real friction internally for many ofthe largest and more innovative brands.Brand marketers need to ask themselves four important questions at this critical juncture:1. How far are you willing to let go of your brand?First off, it’s not your brand anymore. In today’s social environment, it’s your customer’s brand. It’s no longer about pushing out a message toyour target, it’s about engaging in a conversation with these critical consumers. If you continue to claim ‚ownership‛ of your brand, there canbe no real conversation with your customers. They need to be a part of the dialogue, and you need to share your brand and play nice.2. How important are production values in today’s day and age?High quality productions are still important to marketers, but it’s nowhere near as critical as we may have felt in the past. First and foremost,you have to consider the screen size that your production will be rendered on. If your message is going out on tablets, mobile devices oronline in general, you can cut corners on production quality and focus more on delivering a variety of unique messages to your consumers.Additionally, younger audiences today, who were literally born into an age of TV advertising, are increasingly distrustful of overly polishedvideo messaging; big productions can appear less authentic to them than more modest executions. For TV-only executions, with today’s large-screen technology, it continues to be necessary to deliver the highest quality representations for your brand.3. Can I portray my brand in a less than ‛pristine‛ manner?Yes, of course. Your customers are using your product or your service in a less than ‚pristine‛ world, and will relate better to authenticrepresentations of product usage than highly stylized and overly dramatic representations. Authenticity is critical in today’s messagingstrategy, and sometimes that means real-world visuals and executions.4. What does your customer really want from you?More than ever before, your consumers want you to be real. They want an honest representation of your product or service without all thehype and marketing babble. They want to be informed. Your customers would love a little entertainment or amusement in their otherwisehectic and demanding days. They want to learn what’s new about your product, or what makes it special, or better, or worth their time.Just as important, your customers don’t want to be hit over the head with your customer messages time and time again. They want new news,delivered in new ways, with variable messaging, and not ‚tonnage.‛Letting go of your brand is not an easy exercise for marketers. These highly skilled advertisers have grown up in a demanding culture thatinsists on perfection in every form of marketing communications. It’s time to lighten up a bit, and trust that your consumers will understand ifyou are a little less than perfect, but are giving them more in return -- with unique messaging, varied communications, and real, authenticproduct commercials.More Essentials of MarketingGary Stein | April 5, 2013 | 0 CommentsIn my last dispatch to you all, I provided the first set of what I think are the essentials of marketing. The main idea was that, while you canalways try new experiments that break through the noise of the marketplace, you need to ensure that your bases are totally covered. Theessentials are always evolving. A lot of the things that are on this list really didnt exist all that long ago. But that hardly matters: today, youneed to have these things if you want to operate a solid presence.Today, I want to provide the balance of the list: three more things that you need to make sure you have in place to be the 21st centurymarketing powerhouse that you know you can be. Remember, these are the things that you just need to have - not all of them need to be
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 75totally blown out and you may prioritize one over the others. You may decide that your potential path to success is by going heavy on one ofthese, and doing just a bit on some of the others. The important thing is that you consider each one of these completely before setting off intoo many experimental directions.Essential 4: A Broad Activity That Isnt (Exactly) Selling Your ProductIncreasingly, people want to understand the companies that they are doing business with as more than just a supplier of things. They want toget a sense of what the company values and how it thinks about the world as a whole. The best way for a brand to do this is to becomeinvolved in something that isnt directly about selling your brand, but rather a part of a community as a whole. This could be as simple assponsoring the local softball team or museum exhibit. This could also be your social responsibility project, working to improve the environmentor support a community.The important thing about this, from an advertising and a digital perspective, is to ensure that you not only let people know about this, but alsoget them involved in it. By creating sections of your Facebook presence, for example, that highlight the work you are doing in a community, youcan not only attract new people to the brand (and give them a sense of the sort of people you are) but also provide ways for them toparticipate. You want to find ways to allow people to participate with you as you are a part of the community as a whole. This could be assimple as asking people to help spread the word (via sharing, for example) or even to pledge time or money. But take a stand and give peoplea clear way to participate. Thats the important thing.Essential 5: A Home (and a Few Sub-Homes)This seems like a no-brainer at this point, but your brand needs a home base, where everything that you do can be easily found. This shoulddefinitely be a website, but its become a bit more complicated than that. You also need to make sure that you have a space on the placeswhere consumers are living. That means you need to have at least a presence on sites like YouTube and Vimeo, Twitter and Pinterest, andLinkedIn and SlideShare. All of these presences should connect back to your main home (which is most likely your main website). But you haveto make sure that you have a simple and well-defined presence in these spots. Dont leave any out. Even if you dont plan on ever posting avideo, make sure that your brand is alive on YouTube. You can point to other videos that you think may be important or interesting if you donthave anything else to put up, but that would be somewhat lame. If nothing else, sit your CEO down for five minutes and have her tell the storyof the company, or describe your best product, or talk about why you are located in the place where you are located. Just make sure that youshow up when someone does a search.Essential 6: A Never-Ending Pasta Bowl of ContentThis is probably the newest thing that brands are just beginning to realize that they need to have. The fact of the matter is, you are no longerinteracting with people (current and prospective consumers) just through broadcast ads. You are talking with them consistently, often insomewhat casual ways, generally through social media channels. Now, you can simply go on social media and tell a joke or take a photo of asunset, like most people do. But, for brands, the bar is a bit higher. You need to bring something of value to the conversation and that generallymeans providing some kind of content.Now, content has quickly become everyone in marketings favorite word, and its at risk of being overused and under-defined. That is, peopleare calling just about everything "content," from short tweets to long films. Plus, there has been a sharp upward trend in the chatter around"content marketing." Many brands are finding themselves in a spot where they realize they need to do content marketing but are not quite surehow to do it.But this is an essential, nonetheless, so we should be sure to have a solid and simple definition of what it is. Content is something that you canprovide to a consumer that sparks a conversation or at least sparks some curiosity, but isnt directly a sales pitch. So, a coupon isnt content,but the story of someone using a coupon is.You need to begin collecting these pieces of content and have them available to use in these social media settings. These pieces can be thingsyou create yourself or they can be things that you want to point to (news stories, for example) that are relevant to both you and your brand.Have a collection of these available and dole them out through your channels.Thats all. Those are the essentials, at least as I see them. Please remember that this list is meant to free you, not constrain you. Once you getall of these simple things sorted out, you can be confident that youre doing the right things to grow your brand. And once you have confidence,then you can really start to explore.Madison Avenue‘s Odd Couple: Data And Creative Making Beautiful AdsTogetherApr 5, 2013 David Jakubowski |ShareADOTAS ” The Yin and the Yang, The Artist and The Scientist, Venus and Mars. Any one of those descriptors can be aptly applied to themarketing industry’s newest odd couple: the data scientist and the creative director. Long inhabiting different ecosystems, data and creativecan now be found coupling up and making beautiful ads together.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 76Surprised? That’s understandable. As long as Madison Avenue has been the mecca of advertising, numbers guys and creative types haven’treally had much reason to cross paths, never mind collaborate. But that’s changing quickly.Never the Twain Shall Meet, Until…It goes without saying that digital technology has dramatically altered the advertising landscape. Its reach and diversity is eclipsed only by theamount of data it can provide about consumers and their behaviors. Marketers, especially CMOs, have been reveling in this ever growingtreasure trove of data (even if they don’t always know what to do with it ” but we’ll come back to that later). Creative, on the other hand, couldgive a hoot. They’ve always cut a wide berth around numbers and the geeks that crunch them. And why wouldn’t they? Creative’s stock intrade is magic ” not mathematics. They’re the Don Drapers of advertising: swilling a few martinis to get the juices flowing then deftly tossingout pithy phrases, dazzling images and catchy tunes. But lately, the data guys have begun to offer up analyses that really matter to thecreatives. And now the Mad Men want to hang out with the Math Men.Mr. Marketer: Tear Down That WallMost marketers still measure and analyze campaign effectiveness one medium at a time ” in silos. These siloed results are good at informingmarketers of what has already happened and providing a basis on which to suggest potential future trends. But the approach doesn’t takeadvantage of the full range of data available today and it lacks visibility into the entire market dynamic. It doesn’t measure the way differentmediums interact ” how an email campaign might prompt a Google search, for example ” or how outside variables, such as competitors, canimpact campaign performance. Siloed measurement and data can tell creative if an ad performed well, but lacks the more nuanced dataproviding insights into why.Recently, data scientists have created methods to tackle the why questions. Using new, more sophisticated algorithms, they can break downsilos and seamlessly integrate all data sources (first-, second-, and third-party) to get a complete picture across mediums. A recent HarvardBusiness Review article calls the new measurement process ‚analytics 2.0‛, and siloed measurement ‚analytics 1.0‛. The article’s author, WesNichols, says ‚marketers who stick with traditional analytics 1.0 measurement approaches do so at their peril. Those methods, which lookbackward a few times a year to correlate sales with a few dozen variables, are dangerously outdated.‛New, more predictive, comprehensive algorithms and methods can measure dozens of consumer touch points such as which channelsinfluenced a user to convert or buy vs. looking only at the channel where a conversion took place. These methods can break down silos tomeasure across all channels and mediums, making it possible to gauge performance across a range of variables, such as campaign types (e.g.brand awareness, reach, social, or website), or audiences, all in real time. Instead of looking backwards, this approach allows brands andagencies to run ‚what if‛ measurements to help predict likely outcomes. The data can then provide insights to inform resource allocation,creative direction and other campaign elements ” all on the fly ” to boost conversion rates and ROI. Let me describe an example.Things Aren’t Always What They SeemAs part of our work with a major U.S. apparel brand, we measured a campaign they were targeting toward rugged, outdoorsy men, aged 18-35,with a high sports affinity. The campaign’s media buys and creative were all very ‚man-centric‛. The creative images included a panoramicphoto of mountain climbers and another photo that was a clean, simple close up of a rugged looking man.Instead of simply measuringperformance against the intended target segment (a siloed approach), we measured the campaign across a wide variety of audience segmentsincluding those outside the target. Much to our surprise we discovered that the intended audience (male, ages 18-35) did not perform very well(e.g. make purchases) but that another segment that had not been actively targeted „ married women „ performed very well! Ourmeasurements allowed the client to test segments being actively targeted with its media buys as well as those not being targeted. Theresulting data helped not only inform decisions around new media buys, but also realigned the campaign’s creative.Since women, rather than men, were viewing the ad and making the purchases, the creative team eliminated the panoramic image and fine-tuned the rugged looking man photo to better appeal to married women. The media buy and creative changes fueled by the measurement datahelped increase conversions 9x, and resulted in $3M+ incremental revenue. This underscores how data and creative make ads more effectivetogether. Data can inform the creative types that women, not rugged men, are doing the buying. BUT it can’t intuit what visual or phrase mightappeal to those women ” that’s where the ‚magic‛ still comes in.A Match Made in HeavenComprehensive measurement and analyses provides marketers with a host of predictive tools and insights, including data that can informcreative as never before. Sure, creatives will still be the ones with the magic, but now they will look to the numbers guys to learn a new trick ortwo. Suddenly the Data Scientists and the Creative types of the world don’t seem to be such an unusual pair. In fact, the Mad Men and theMath Men may become a match made in heaven.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 77Big Data, Big Ads, Big Results: Pulling Data Science into A PremiumExchangeby Skip Brand, Yesterday, 9:30 PMIf you’re planning to launch a premium display marketplace, audience targeting and insights are going to be a critical element. Insights arealways important, of course, but when you’re investing in oversized rich-media advertising units and targeting particular audience segmentsamong affluent consumers, you’ll want to be confident that the ads are reaching the right folks. Ads like the IAB portrait are already expensiveto create, and they cost more to place. Data that helps advertisers hit their mark and prove success will also fuel their desire to continue toinvest in online display at scale.nPario provides data-driven services to help advertisers gain audience insights so they can create targeted, relevant advertising. When Irecently spoke with Bassel Ojjeh, president and CEO of nPario, he was enthusiastic about adding data science to real-time branding. ‚A richmedia ad marketplace that is driven by the very best data, segmentation and data science insights is a step in the right direction if we want toattract global brand budgets online,‛ he said.‚The value of data has already been proven in media buys,‛ said Ojjeh. ‚When it comes to high value, rich-media units, the value of the databecomes magnified for two reasons: One, the advertisers will look to maximize the return on advertising spend, and data provides a verystrong signal in that aspect.‛ Advertisers will learn not only how much the return was, but how valuable each interaction was with quantifiableaudience data. ‚Two,‛ he continued, ‚the publishers have the ability to collect even more user data (behavior, interaction, response, etc.) fromthese rich-media units, which can then be used to optimize media campaigns. This ‘consumer intelligence’ is the key when it comes to enablingdata-driven advertising.‛The benefits nPario brings to an exchange like this one are really threefold. The first is that it enables advertisers to gain a real, data-drivenunderstanding of who their audience is. This understanding is critical not just in terms of targeting for acquisition purposes, but for reallygetting to know who their audience is in terms of commercial intent: demographics, technographics, hobbies, online habits and beyond. Thesedata points can not only inform ad placement, but also ad creative and messaging.The second benefit is that, with deeper understanding of their audience, advertisers can effectively create their own ideal segments. They canbuild very granular descriptions of consumer segments to target with their marketing efforts, and understand what the size of that universeactually is within and beyond a specific network or marketplace.The third benefit is optimization. Advertisers can, at any point, review their campaign to discover how a particular segment responded to theircreative versus how another segment may have responded. By incorporating data from rich interactive media units like the Rising Stars,additional behavioral data can be used to optimize campaigns.‚By understanding your audience, you can engage them based on commercial intent,‛ offered Ojjeh. ‚By leveraging consumer intelligence andapplying some data science, you can increase the relevance of your creative and the placement of your ads. By pulling in data from richadvertising units, you can further optimize how well your ads will resonate with your target audience. The combination of a premiummarketplace with rich advertising units and consumer intelligence gives you unprecedented control in acquiring customers ” and the more youuse it, the better information you will have to optimize your ads.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/197055/big-data-big-ads-big-results-pulling-data-scien.html?edition=58448#ixzz2PRkuKiFmUsing Visual Story Telling To Build Stronger Relationships WithConsumersApr 3, 2013 Apu Gupta |► RetweetADOTAS ” Consumer behavior is undergoing a significant shift. Social media conversations are transitioning from text to pictures, makingimages the new currency of social media engagement. With cameras in every phone and the entire web itself becoming a more visual place,consumers are increasingly beginning to communicate with pictures rather than words. It is as if, in many ways, we have circled back to thedays of our ancestors. Instead of painting on caves, we have begun to Pin, Reblog, and Instagram our daily lives and our biggest aspirations.This happens for one simple reason: Images drive an emotional reaction with an immediacy that no other medium offers.For smart, forward-looking brands, this transition holds the promise of something truly special ” the ability to move a consumer from atransactional relationship to an emotional one. Emotional relationships help to humanize brands and form deeper and more durable connectionsbetween the consumer and the brand. A survey performed in late 2012 by rbb Public Relations found that these personal connections betweenconsumers and brands payoff. 83% of consumers are willing to pay more for products when they feel an affinity to the brand.Pinterest offers a particularly powerful platform for engaging consumers visually. Beyond its image-centric user interface, Pinterest is also athematic rather than temporal platform. Facebook and Twitter are both time-centric. As new posts come in, older items get pushed down until
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 78they are essentially out of site. Pinterest, and its collection of boards and pins rely much less on time. While the order of pins on a board areinfluenced by time, numerous image posts can be seen simultaneously, diminishing the importance of time. In fact, unlike Facebook and Twitterwhich display a date next to every post, the contents of a board show no dates until you click into an individual pin. Rather than focus on time,Pinterest focuses on themes. Images are grouped together based on an overall theme. For consumers, this theme may be named ‚Products ILove‛ but for brands, this could just as well be ‚Our First Store.‛ The thematic nature of Pinterest makes posts much less fleeting and givesbrands new forms of creative expression.As a starting point, many brands have chosen to express their creativity using some variation on a ‚lifestyle‛ theme. The brand curates aselection of images interspersing products with images that reinforce the brand’s identity and the product’s context. For instance, REI, a retailerof outdoor adventure gear, has a board called ‚Wanderlust,‛ which mixes in products with inspiring pictures of places to use those products.If lifestyle boards were version one of brands engaging consumers visually on Pinterest, storytelling will be version two. Whereas lifestyleboards display a loosely related assortment of images, storytelling boards will weave a narrative through the images to string together a tightstory. Consider this as the difference between a stack of pictures and a coffee table book. Taken alone, the pictures are beautiful. Compiledwith a narrative, the images leave a lasting impression.For instance, many brands that are household names have rich and interesting histories that can be expressed visually. Porsche has takensteps towards this by creating a ‚Porsche history‛ board with strong visuals and detailed descriptions that give us some insights into thebrand. Their relatively new ‚50 Years of 911‛ board holds great potential, but practically begs for 50 images with a clear connection to each ofthe 50 years and descriptions that help us understand the evolution of this iconic vehicle.Of course, storytelling doesn’t have to be only about corporate history. From concept, to manufacturing, to real-life use cases, products havegreat stories waiting to be told. The visual web provides a fantastic opportunity to bring the product and brand backstory into the visual age. Indoing so, brands can couple the richness of a written backstory with the emotional appeal of imagery.Finally, brands shouldn’t ignore the role of user-generated imagery. Sites like Instagram for instance, provide creative brands an opportunity toencourage consumers to share their brand experiences visually. The resulting real-life stories provide a level of authenticity that brands simplycannot get from their own efforts.The increasing shift towards a more visual web is giving brands entirely new ways to form more emotional connections with their consumers.The visual story is an important part of capturing the attention and affinity of consumers. To be effective, these stories need a narrative thatbrings the images to life and communicates the brand’s identity. Experimentation, creativity, and planning are key, but above all keep yourcontent relevant and keep your story real.Ant Keogh‘s DOs and DON‘TsAnt Keogh: ‚It’s amazing how everything falls into place when you look at the finished work.‛Ant Keogh of CLEMENGER BBDO Melbourne is one of our numerous network star creatives. BBDO Worldwide is famous for its professionaltalent. We have seen the work but how did these creatives get to the end result? What is essential for them in their work? What motivates andguides them? Ant will be hosting our first seminar in the new rubric DOs & DON’Ts. Ant’s work includes the Sloooooow ad movie Slow Mo forCarlton. As Executive Creative Director of CLEMENGER BBDO Melbourne, Ant has won a range of awards, including Cannes Lions, One Show,AWARD, M2C, Adfest, Mobius, New York Festival and others.DOsWrite for the customer rather than the client. Though, hopefully the result should please both.Treat all your clients as if they can produce world class work. We have done some of our best work on what everyone thought were the mostdifficult client categories.When you’re pitching an interactive idea, ask yourself the question, will the customer care about this? Will they care enough to do what we’reasking of them?Have an emergency social media plan ready for if/when something goes wrong with your interactive idea. If you wait until something does gowrong, by the time everyone approves your response it will be too late.Ask to shoot a version your way if you have a really strong gut feeling about something.Try doing what your client suggests on an edit before a knee-jerk ‚No, it won’t work.‛ That way, you won’t look so stupid when they’re right(and they quite often are).
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 79Break rules that are laid out in DO and DON’T lists!DON’TsDon’t think that just because you’re shooting a TVC in mock-documentary style, you won’t need great production. Most times this stylerequires the best director and actors.Don’t burn clients by doing self-serving work. You’ll end up going one step forward, ten steps back.Don’t necessarily be scared of research. Sometimes when we’ve been at an impasse with our client there was nothing to lose ” we’vesuggested research and it backed up our side of the argument. And if it doesn’t go your way, maybe you were wrong. Better to know.Don’t lose faith towards the end of the production process when things turn bad and you’re tired. I’m amazed how often things get back ontrack at the very last minute, when everyone is looking at the finished work.Income, Education Levels Impact TV Viewingby Wayne Friedman, Yesterday, 11:02 AMEducationally savvy TV users and TV go together -- but not in the way TV networks and marketers might like.Higher education and income levels correspond with less TV usage, particularly at the early and late parts of the day. For example, those withfour years of college or more watch an average of an hour and 14 minutes of prime time, versus those with just a high school education, whowatch two hours and eight minutes a day, per Nielsen.Those with just a high-school education watch an average of one hour and 16 minutes of morning TV versus 48 minutes for those with fouryears or more of college. Those with just a high-school education watch two hours of daytime programming versus an hour and seven minutesfor those with four years or more of college.Income levels in other daytimes correspond in similar ways -- 54 minutes in the morning for those making $100,000; an hour and 12 minutes inthe morning for those making less than $30,000. Daytime programming is at an hour and 58 minutes for those making $30,000 or less and anhour and 12 minutes for those making $100,000 or more.But Nielsen research shows that many users can yield similar viewing time in prime time. For example, those who are making less than $30,000a year watch an average of an hour and 58 minutes; those making $100,000 or more watch an average of an hour and 52 minutes.3 comments on "Income, Education Levels Impact TV Viewing".Michael Natale from MCM Media Salescommented on: April 2, 2013 at 5:47 p.m.wait...in the begining of the article you say that higher education corresponds to less primetime viewing but at the end you say income levelshave similar primetime viewing levels.....if education levels directly affect income levels then wouldnt they have similar findings?John Grono from GAP Researchcommented on: April 2, 2013 at 6:06 p.m.Just a thought. These may be cohorts. I suspect it is that higher educated and more highly paid people have a tendency to work in professionsand jobs that demand a longer working day - hence reduced TV viewing. This is not to say that only higher educated and paid people work longdays! Id like to see the analysis based on claimed hours worked per week. For example an interstate truck driver works long hours and Isuspect they watch less than the norm.Tony Reynolds from Reynolds Sports and Entertainmentcommented on: April 3, 2013 at 8:08 a.m.I wonder has this data changed much in the past 50 years? It seems that those with higher incomes will be out creating wealth. BUT withtodays "TV everywhere" concepts, such as handhelds, iPads, viewing from many such micro devices, television consumption may be increasingon-the-go and not just at home. Just thinking out loud! Cheers!
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 80Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/197108/income-education-levels-impact-tv-viewing.html?edition=58416#ixzz2PPI5vA28The Opportunity Cost of Targeting to Death: Part I of IV - SteveBookbinder- Digital Media TrainingPublished: April 3, 2013 at 1:5 AM PDTBy Steve BookbinderThis 4-part article is for media buyers who are tempted to apply a severe demo-targeting requirement to their next buy, described by mediasellers as "targeting to death." Can you achieve your goals without micro-managing the targeting requirements? From a high level, targeting ona publisher site may appear to be the safest choice. But, in actual practice, it may work against your own best interest.Are you an over-targeter? Do you find that you shop endlessly for just the right target ”audience profile and content and the both together -only to find that no one can hit your targeted impression goals on quality content? Publishers and networks call this targeting to death. Ahorrible way to go. Often the publisher misses the goal for the first 3 weeks of the campaign month and then a network comes in for a scaledAND targeted BIG week 4. Was this really necessary? More importantly, is it in the advertisers best interest?One of the best things about digital advertising is the ability to target. Apart from contextually targeting users on relevant content, we canreach any demographic through behavioral targeting and past shoppers with retargeting. Lets not leave out geo, day-part as well as targetingby OS, device, browser and even Geo-dem. There are 62 pieces of information that can be known about each user. There are many PCoperating systems that we can target and 150 mobile ones. There are more than 30 tablets even if you only heard of 1 or 2 of them. Given that,how valuable is targeting too tightly in advance of testing? What are we really trying to accomplish ” reach a particular target? Or, achieve aparticular (and valuable) marketing effect on either branding or performance? That said, over-targeting may put too much focus on the frontend of the process and encourage guessing. End result: buyers wanting no-waste in reaching a very specific person --even if there are only 7of those people and itd be simpler to call them to let them know you are targeting them for a marketing campaign.Before locking in on a target, we should consider the opportunity-cost of too narrowly selecting a target …the right audience on exactly theright content…beforetesting a new campaign on a new site. Below are 4 things to consider before putting a specific demo target in the cross-hairs; this week we will focus on #1.1. Grouping strategy2. Referring traffic3. Taxonomy4. Cost of ScalingGrouping Strategy ” This has an impact on both paid search and display; the clearest way to understand grouping strategy is to start byenvisioning a Paid Search campaign. On SERPs (search engine results pages) there is a war going on as marketers fight, not so much for thetop of the page but for overall brand supremacy.All brands know that each paid position has a predictable CTR (click through rate). Their bid cost, in general, will be higher for top positions butcan be lowered through factors like QS (quality score). So, improving QS is a never ending practice. Apart from position and cost-per-click forthat position, the marketer has to decide which matching strategy to apply to each Keyword: Broad Match, Phrase Match or Exact Match. Bythe way, as in all advertising, the more targeted the more expensive but the smaller the inventory. Marketers test each key word with eachmatching strategy at each position to learn which combination converts most efficiently as well as which one scales best. Why not simplyalways bid for positions # 1-3? Because the possible inventory usually exceeds the marketers budget; the game is about maximizing theimpact of their budget. Its about optimizing and scaling. Its possible, given the cost to that marketer for being in those top positions, they willnot have enough budget to cover all of the desired hours of the day as well as additional keywords if they use up all of their funds against themost coveted (and expensive) key words, which their peers are also competing for. But the trickiest part of the planning is the grouping ofKeyword>Matching Strategy>Creative>Landing Page>Conversion (any desired action or engagement). Each part of the grouping strategy has tobe constantly tested to ensure optimal optimization. The first part of the group is really before Keyword ” what is the intention of a user whosearches with that keyword? Can a different intention be inferred from users using that same keyword across various search engines? Shouldwe show a person with a different intention a differently worded ad? Use a different matching strategy? Bring them to a different landingpage?Now, lets consider how grouping impacts display. We think we are simplifying the game by pre-determining the exact content and demo targetand now all we have to do is worry about which creative to serve them. But, lets look at the entire group: The users Intention>Choice ofCreative>Served on a particular device>at that time> with that geo-target>landing page>conversion path to desired action. With all of thosemoving parts, how sure can we be that the correct target is M 34„39; HHI over $150k, interested in finance, etc…with the ad served when thecontent is relevant (contextual targeting) or irrelevant (BT)? Even if we worked out the perfect grouping strategy recipe on a different site or
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 81network can we be so sure itd convert that way again on a different platform we are testing? If we guess wrong on the target or guess wrongon being too tightly targeted we miss learning what is just outside of our bulls-eye. Maybe the next outer ring would convert better? Or have ahigher AOV (average order value) or higher LTV (lifetime value)?Maybe we should spend more time creating the right landing pages and less time guessing the perfect target? Think about that the next timeyou are tempted to over-target when testing a new campaign or a new site or network.Next time, we will look at #2 ” how Referring Traffic data may be more important than over-targeting.Connected device usage diverges:NEW YORK: Tablet devices are being used in very different ways to smartphones, research from Time Inc, the media group, has revealed.The company ran an Innovation Panel Study of almost 1,000 tablet and smartphone owners during December 2012 and found that, even as thetwo devices approach each other in terms of size with the release of "phablet"-style devices, usage patterns are diverging.Writing in Mobile Commerce Daily, Betsy Frank, chief research and insights officer of Time Inc, said that tablets are mostly used unwinding athome, while smartphones are more associated with being outside the home "on the go".Frank contrasted the "me time" consumers spend relaxing with tablets with what she described as "found time" ” those short pockets of timeconsumers have while waiting for a train or an appointment and when they reach for their mobile."Publishers and marketers need to program for these pockets visually and provide real substance in smaller doses," wrote Frank, "making"found time" a valuable find".This divide is also apparent in how the devices are used. Wile people consume media such as newspapers and video on a tablet, they take andshare photos, or refer to maps, on smartphones.The crossover areas that are commonly used across both types of mobile device are getting news, reading emails and accessing social mediaand finding deals or coupons.Frank also said that tablet owners are far more likely to use that device while watching TV than are smartphone owners. Around half of alltablet owners say they use their tablets at least half of all the time they are watching TV, but only one third of smartphone owners do this andmore than 25% never do.Ads are more accepted on tablets compared with smartphones, Frank said. "Tablets, increasingly, are media consumption devices, andadvertising in media is a fact of life." But smartphones are "personal hubs" where ads are often regarded as intrusive.Consequently, "marketers need to tread carefully into this very personal world of mobile, and consider the consumer and the context, ratherthan thinking about tablets and smartphones as two sides of the same coin," Frank added.Make Yourself an ExpertThe most valuable people in any organization have deep smarts „ business-critical expertise built up through years of experience which helpsthem make wise, swift decisions. If you wish to become this go-to person in your company, but dont have the time or opportunity toaccumulate all the experience of your predecessors, acquire the knowledge in a different way „ by consciously thinking about how the expertsaround you operate and deliberately learning from them. Of course, you shouldnt aim to become a carbon copy of another person. Deeplysmart people are a unique product of their particular mind-set, education, and experience. But you should be able to identify the elements oftheir knowledge and behavior that make them so valuable to the organization.Psychological Priming And The Path To Purchaseby Gord Hotchkiss, Thursday, March 28, 2013In marketing, I suspect we pay too much attention to the destination, and not enough to the journey. We don’t take into account the cumulativeeffect of the dozens of subconscious cues we encounter on the path to our ultimate purchase. We certainly don’t understand the subtlechanges of direction that can result from these cues.Search is a perfect example of this.As search marketers, we believe that our goal is to drive a prospect to a landing page. Some of us worry about the conversion rates once aprospect gets to the landing page. But almost none of us think about the frame of mind of prospects once they reach the landing page.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 82‚Frame‛ is the appropriate metaphor here, because the entire interaction will play out inside this frame. It will impact all the subsequent‚downstream‛ behaviors. The power of priming should not be taken likely.Here’s just one example of how priming can wield significant unconscious power over our thoughts and actions. Participants primed byexposure to a stereotypical representation of a ‚professor‛ did better on a knowledge test than those primed with a representation of a‚supermodel.‛A simple exposure to a word can do the trick. It can frame an entire consumer decision path. So, if many of those paths start with a searchengine, consider the influence that a simple search listing may have.We could be primed by the position of a listing (higher listings = higher quality alternatives). We could be primed (either negatively orpositively) by an organization that dominates the listing real estate. We could be primed by words in the listing. We could be primed by animage. A lot can happen on that seemingly innocuous results page.Of course, the results page is just one potential ‚priming‛ platform. Priming could happen on the landing page, a third-party site or the websiteitself. Every single touch point, whether we’re consciously interacting with it or not, has the potential to frame, or even sidetrack, our decisionprocess.If the path to purchase is littered with all these potential landmines (or, to take a more positive approach, ‚opportunities to persuade‛), how dowe use this knowledge to become better marketers? This does not fall into the typical purview of the average search marketer.Personally, I’m a big fan of the qualitative approach (I know -- big surprise) in helping to lay down the most persuasive path possible. Actuallytalking to customers, observing them as they navigate typical online paths in a usability testing session, and creating some robust scenarios touse in your own walk-throughs will yield far better results than quantitative number-crunching. Excel is not a particularly good at beingempathetic.Jakob Nielsen has said that online, branding is all about experience, not exposure. As search marketers, it’s our responsibility to ensure thatwe’re creating the most positive experience possible, as our prospects make their way to the final purchase.The devil, as always, is in the details -- whether we’re paying conscious attention to them or not.The 3 Cs of Content MarketingLaney Whitcanack | March 27,Successful content marketing programs hinge on the 3 Cs - content, context, and communication. When these techniques are applied correctly,everyone wins: publishers engage their audiences through high-quality content, and marketers leverage this symbiotic relationship to delivertransparent brand messages that convert readers into real consumers. When any one of these three Cs isnt adhered to, readers are quick toring the alarm - perhaps the best recent example is the debacle that ensued from the Church of Scientologys sponsored post in The Atlantic.As content grows as a marketing "must-have," heres a quick rundown of what the three Cs mean to both publishers and brands:Content. When readers consume quality content, they engage with it - and ultimately share it - because it provides value to their socialnetworks. When publishers view sponsored content as a natural extension of their editorial calendars (and marketers respect the need forauthenticity), audiences are more inclined to share what they see. Readers flock to the Oh Joy! blog for beautiful lifestyle content rooted inauthor Joy Chos unique perspective. This post incorporates a branded message while staying true to the editorial style and imagery Cho isknown for.Context. Successful content marketing campaigns put a brands message in the right place at the right time. (You wouldnt expect to see apost on leather handbags on your favorite vegan food blog, would you?) Content marketing has to be an invited guest or it will stick out like asore thumb. Devour readers come to the site to engage with and consume the latest and greatest viral videos. It makes perfect sense for acool sponsored video (like this one produced by Cadillac) to be showcased on the site.Communication. Savvy readers can smell inauthenticity a mile away. Publishers should always be upfront and disclose the origin ormotivations for sponsored content. Such transparency sets an audience up for a successful reading experience and makes them feel morecomfortable with a brand providing that content and experience. This post from Little Green Notebook details the authors history with thesponsoring brand and encourages dialogue from readers who share in her affinity.When high-quality content and appropriate context are missing from the equation, readers feel violated by both the publisher and marketer,breaking down the entire publisher-marketer-audience ecosytem. Paying attention to the three Cs keeps everyone happy as brands andpublishers work together to evolve the content marketing landscape.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 83Social ads deliver in BrazilRIO DE JANEIRO: Over 70% of internet users in Brazil agree that ads on social networks increase their purchase intent, a survey by McKinseyhas revealed.According to the consultancy, some 80% of the countrys digital population visited a social network in the six months before its poll wasundertaken, and a 64% majority had more than one profile on these platforms.Fully 73% of the panel "didnt mind" if brands advertised on the social media services they used, and the same number were "more likely" toconsider products promoted in this way.An additional 72% of McKinseys sample would be prepared to "click through and buy a product" which has been recommended by a friend onsites like Facebook, Twitter and Orkut.For 37% of those polled, social networks were their favourite method of making and receiving recommendations concerning subjects includingbrands, content and music."Brazilians put a lot of trust in social relationships. Social networks offer companies opportunities to tie targeted products with therecommendations of trusted people in consumers lives," the study said. "Great potential exists for tech-savvy marketers to directly leveragethis trust."Companies were also expected to listen and respond to online chatter discussing their activities by 43% of contributors.With regard to ecommerce, only 38% of connected consumers had made an online purchase in the three months prior to the poll, and 10% didso through a mobile phone. This situation appears set to change, however.The study said: "If purchase intention is factored into the outlook for the next six months, Brazil edges out more developed markets, whichsuggests that many consumers are just about to make their first online purchases."Moreover, the web plays a key role during the product research stage, as 62% of users investigate potential acquisitions on the net.Among the early adopters engaging in this pastime via mobile phone, wireless handsets were actually the most widely-researched category, on67%, beating household appliances with 51% and travel products with 47%.Overall, McKinsey found that social networks take 34% of all time spent online, ahead of news and information sites on 17%, portals on 15%,and then blogs and company websites on 8% apiece.Data sourced from McKinsey; additional content by Warc staff, 1 April 2013Read more at http://www.warc.com/LatestNews/News/EmailNews.news?ID=31203&Origin=WARCNewsEmail#kGdzZvKjR24T8IQh.99The M-Election: Mobility Enhances Donations And Citizen Scrutinyby Steve Smith, Nov 12, 2012, 9:23 AMThe line on mobile donations is that this method of contributing to political campaigns allows activists or just inspired sympathizers to respondimmediately to inspiration or just a plain old response to a call to action. According to payvia, the company powering mobile contributions toboth the Obama and Romney campaigns, one in ten donors to the 2012 Presidential campaigns at some point used either SMS or an in-appmethod to send money to their candidate of choice.The smartphone is the always-there device that can respond on the spot to a range of inspiring moments. According to payvia, when an on-screen text-to-donate prompt at the summer Democratic National Convention occurred during a speech from Obama campaign manager Jim
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 84Messina, there was a 61% spike in activity. Likewise, when Gov. Romney’s campaign streamed his well-received first debate performance onhis official site, a prompt for text donations nearby attracted a 96% growth in the volume of SMS donations within a day (Oct. 3).Mobile devices were integral to the political discourse leading up to last Tuesday’s election. According to metrics gathered by payvia fromvarious public sources, 37% of all voters used mobile devices to get or discuss political information, but among a key youth demographic -- 18-to-34-year-olds -- 56% were found to discuss political candidates over their mobile devices.Payvia contends that the levels of mobile use among the electorate to engage in politics in 2012 suggests an even richer role moving forward.According to some surveys, 60% of people in the U.S. are ready to vote over their devices. Payvia predicts that in the 2016 Presidential cycle50% of donors will use mobile means to support candidates. This method will become increasingly important to the 2014 House and Senateraces. Campaigns may well use devices to live stream events to a broader audience. The company also contends that social media sites forcandidates typically will have text-to-donate options. By 2016, payvia says we should see a fully ‚mobilized electorate,‛ which donates,interacts with campaigns and even votes over their mobile devices. A full infographic of payvias findings and predictions is available atMashable.Curiously, now we discuss the benefits of mobile as a donation device. In previous cycles we had been talking about the ways in which mobilephones were making elections more transparent by putting a hidden videocam and audio recorder at every campaign event and private meeting.How many political gaffes and revealing moments (not to mention the now-infamous Romney ‚47%‛ video) bubbled to public view because ofportable devices? Mobility and the facility of people leveraging their mobile devices in a multitude of ways have changed the political landscapeacross many dimensions. Perhaps for the better, politicians can expect no privacy and ever-diminishing off-the-record moments.Every smartphone owner is his or her own media organization exercising personal judgment over what should be public about encounters withpublic figures. One of the things that mobility has erased in the current and recent cycles is the traditional journalistic buffer -- the gentlemen’sagreements between press and politicos over what is and is not fair game in public discourse.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/187028/the-m-election-mobility-enhances-donations-and-ci.html?edition=53412#ixzz2P4fkR5O0Pesquisa revela perfis dos brasileiros nas redes sociaisWhat Agencies Can Expect From New Business in 2013New Year Brings New ChallengesBy: Rupal Parekh Published: January 07, 2013The days when agencies could expect multiple $100 million-plus, agency-of-record accounts to go up for grabs each year are now barely visiblein the rear-view mirror. Heres what to expect from new business in 2013.Michael Goldberg, Deutsch CMOIn 2012, there was no shortage of roster trimming and project work rather than AOR assignments. With the economy continuing to put pressureon marketing budgets, finding revenue will be tough for many shops."Were seeing more of a desire to not necessarily leave an agency, but to negotiate lower fees and find efficiencies," said Ann Billock, principalat consultancy Ark Advisors.Agencies need to get used to earning clients business bit by bit, even pitching for every little project on clients theyve long worked for."Theres a reluctance to say the term "AOR because clients want to have something like an open-marriage relationship, or an option to have an"out," said Michael Goldberg, chief marketing officer at Deutsch.Agencies in 2013 must carefully balance revenue with potential for doing great creative. Theyll also need to keep searching for dollars outsideof the marketing suite. "Developing IP or innovative platforms makes you more valuable to your clients and theres a potential opportunity forrevenue shares, or coming with technologies of your own to license and sell," said Ms. Billock.Industry execs anticipate heightened interest from marketers in communications planning and analytics capabilities. And as the lines blur,agencies will find themselves pitching against a variety of new players."One of the things were hoping to see more of this year is digital agencies participating more in general-market reviews," said Ms. Billock.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 85Why Advertising Agencies Must Disrupt ThemselvesTim WilliamsJanuary 19, 2013‚The days when agencies expect multiple $100 million-plus agency-of-record accounts to go up for grabs each year are now barely visible inthe rear-view mirror.‛ So begins a recent article in Advertising Age that attempts to dissect what’s happening to the business model of theadvertising agency business.What’s happening to agencies is the same thing that has happened to the PC business, the airline business, and the steel business. Theadvertising agency industry is being disrupted.‚Disruptive innovations are like missiles launched at your business,‛ says Clayton Christensen, the father of the theory of disruptive innovation.Over the years, Christensen and his colleagues have described missile after missile that has taken aim and destroyed its target: iTunes inmusic, Southwest in airlines, Charles Schwab in investing. Disruptive innovation isn’t necessarily a new technology; it’s usually a recombinationof existing features and technologies served up in disruptive way. Southwest didn’t reinvent the airplane, but it could be said that they helpedreinvent air travel.In fact, Christensen discovered that in most industries, the new disruptive offerings that had brought the big established companies downweren’t always better; sometimes they were actually ‚worse.‛ But because they were offered at a lower cost, they gained quick adoption. Inindustry after industry, while the big guys are busy adding features (and costs) to their existing products and services, the disruptors find waysto solve similar customer problems at lower costs and steal huge swaths of both customers and market share. Think Netflix and Blockbuster.Too late to successfully fight back using your current modelIn effect, disruptors enter the lower end of the market and take the business the large incumbents either don’t want or have stopped payingattention to. But having gained a foothold in the market, these disruptors continue to innovate and gain more and more share until it’s usuallytoo late for the incumbents to successfully fight back.The essence of the problem is that large incumbent organizations aren’t really focused on innovative ways to create value for their customers,but rather on continuing to feed the machine. Their version of innovation is ‚sustaining innovation,‛ which is about making continual incrementalimprovements in their existing category and business model. When faced with disruptive innovators, the incumbents usually react by trying tolower their prices. This manifests itself in the agency world with firms lowering fees in negotiations with procurement. But the result is that thelarge traditional firms are now caught in a downward spiral and continue to shrink both in relative size and stature.Disruption in professional servicesIn professional services, the legal industry is being disrupted not only by low-cost providers like LegalZoom and LawPivot, but innovativeenterprises like Clearspire. The large legacy firms pretend not to be bothered by these disruptors, but in fact ‚big law‛ is in a steady decline,with the world’s largest law firms accounting for less and less of the total market for legal services.To look at what’s happening in the advertising business, I would invite you to imagine two columns on a sheet of paper; one labeled‚Incumbents‛ and the other ‚Disrupters.‛ The names you would list under ‚incumbents‛ may be fairly obvious. But who or what would you listas ‚disrupters?‛ Here are a few I’d put on my list:Open source creative resources (Giant Hydra, Ideasicle, Genius Rocket)Advertising platforms and virtual agencies (SpotRunner, Pick-n-Click Ads)Audience platforms and agency trading desks (Accuen, Mediabrands, Xaxis, Funbox)Marketing implementation companies (Avventa, Tag, E-Graphics)Production companies as agencies (B Reel, Trailer Park, Radical Media)Media companies as agencies (Conde Nast Studio, Electus, Scratch)Technology companies as marketing services providers (Google, Facebook, Foursquare)Really only one solutionHow can an existing company cope in this environment? Disrupt your own brand. That’s what Andy Grove did years ago by creating Intel’s ownlow-end disruptor: the Celeron chip (on the advice of Clay Christensen, by the way).
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 86To take it one step further, Christensen believed that ultimately the only way a entrenched company can avoid being disrupted is to set up asmall separate venture ” located away from headquarters -- that functions like a new company. This venture must not be held to the sameincome and profit expectations as the mother ship, but should be run like a start up. Importantly, the new venture cannot be a ‚division‛ of theestablished incumbent, operating under the corporate umbrella. It must have complete independence to implement its own structure andbusiness model.Advertising agency executives are famous for walking into their clients’ offices and encouraging them to take visionary risks; to ‚disrupt‛ theirbrand. This might be the perfect time for us to take our own medicine.JetBlues Loyalty Lessons: Let Customers Decideby Sarah Mahoney, Dec 17, 2012, 8:51 AMLocals may be well on their way to digging out after Hurricane Sandy, but JetBlue says it is still learning from the cause-related program ithustled to put into place in the days after the storm.Working with KULA Causes, JetBlue set up a giving platform just days after the storm passed through New York and New Jersey, whichallowed the airline’s frequent fliers to donate directly to the American Red Cross. What made the program different, though, is that JetBluerewarded its members for doing so, doling out six TrueBlue points for every dollar donated.‚We went to KULA and asked them to help us get this in place quickly,‛ Dave Canty, JetBlue’s director of loyalty marketing, tells MarketingDaily. ‚We put the information out on our Web site and pushed it out through social networks. We had thought we might generate $40,000 or$50,000, and that JetBlue would match it. And the results were extraordinary. We surpassed that goal within the first hour, and in November,raised a total of $800,000.‛It was especially important to the company, he says, ‚because we are the hometown airline of New York, and this was right on our doorstep.Not only were customers affected and displaced, ‚so were our crew members. We had already been in conversations with KULA, and we reallyjust wanted to get funds to the Red Cross as quickly as possible.‛Following the success of the Sandy donations, JetBlue and KULA then cooked up another twist on True Giving, letting each member turn theirunused JetBlue points into gifts for 2.5 million nonprofits in 80 countries.‚We’ve gone out and talked to TrueBlue customers, and asked them what they wanted,‛ Mark Dority, KULA’s director of marketing, tellsMarketing Daily. ‚And customers have always said, I’d love to be able to donate my points.’‛Customers can make donations to the charity of their choice by entering a group’s name, a region, or a cause, and make donations in points,with JetBlue matching some gifts. They can even click within functions in each group, so they can send their points-as-cash gifts to focus onsuch areas as development, training, or advocacy. KULA then emails the receipts to customers.For Canty, the success of the Sandy program and the new True Giving isn’t just raising cash for causes, it’s that it is doing so in support of thebrand’s personality. ‚Our mission is bringing humanity back to air travel,‛ Canty says, ‚and these efforts really speak to that, to the brand’shumanity.‛3 comments on "JetBlues Loyalty Lessons: Let Customers Decide ".1. Ted Rubin from Collective Bias / The Rubin Organizationcommented on: December 18, 2012 at 8:51 a.m.I asked this question on the past post about this program and never received and answer. Not that I ever receive a reply to a comment onMediaPost, but who knows... maybe we can break new ground. What is the conversion rate to $s for giving TrueBlue points to a charitablecause? Looking forward to a reply, but not holding my breath ;-)2. Phil Rubin from rDialoguecommented on: December 18, 2012 at 1:01 p.m.Ted - surprise! Its funny (sad perhaps) that there are so few comments on these posts. The conversion rate is about .75 cents ($0.0075) perpoint. You get a $10 donation for 1,334 points, at least at the sample I looked at. The rate holds at various donation levels. Phil3. Ted Rubin from Collective Bias / The Rubin Organizationcommented on: December 18, 2012 at 1:11 p.m.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 87Thanks Phil... and I really like your atitude and sense of humor. But I was referring to the fact that the authors of these posts never botherreplying to questions or comments ;-) That is a reasonable credit, especially if they are matching. It then qualifies as a match that has valueinstead of simply another way to inexpensively retire points.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/189474/jetblues-loyalty-lessons-let-customers-decide.html?edition=54628#ixzz2P4h84ZawHow Google Views Predictive Modelsby Laurie Sullivan, Nov 12, 2012, 1:17 PMA series of recently published and granted patents provide insight into how Googles engineers view predictive modeling.The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office gave a handful of Google engineers the nod on a series of three patents focused on predictive modeling.The patents describe a series of predictive tasks ranging from predictive navigation to analytics. The patents are related to integration ofpredictive models and software applications.The patents are titled Predictive Model Application Programming Interface, Predicting User Navigation Events, Predictive Analytical DataSelection, and Predictive Analytical Modeling Accuracy Assessment.One of the more interesting patents points to predictive modeling, a method that relies on predictive analysts to create a statistical model thatpredict behavior. Forecasting trends requires lots of data. Two of the patents refer to training data models to better predict trends.During the recent U.S. presidential electronics we saw predictive modeling expand from ad targeting to forecasting the elections in searchresults. Its all about harnessing the power of data.Googles predictive modeling accuracy assessment and data selection patents explain a method for assessing the accuracy of the model.Google describes how the "predictive model repository includes multiple updateable trained predictive models which are each associated withan accuracy score that represents an estimation of the accuracy of the trained predictive model."The patent, Predicting User Navigation Events, provides a method to speed search query processing. Delays in retrieving information can causethe person searching for content to go elsewhere. The act of serving up information may happen nearly instantaneously, but a delay still existsas the technology sends a request for data from the host, sending it to the client, and rendering the content in the browser.No matter how quickly information serves up in queries, "the act of browsing the Web is not instantaneous." The patent explains that whilehigh-speed Internet access may limit this delay to a few seconds, even the few-second delay can add up to thousands of man-hours of lostproductivity each year.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/187073/how-google-views-predictive-models.html?edition=53414#ixzz2P4hN6TRTWeb Analytics Is Dead, Long Live Digital IntelligenceNeil Mason | December 27, 2012A provocative title perhaps, but we all know that the digital landscape has changed out of all recognition over the past few years. The web hasshifted from the "web of things" (the content web) to the "web of people" (the social web). As a result weve seen the proliferation ofacquisition and media channels with Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube figuring alongside the more "traditional" digital channels of search,affiliated, and display. The way we access the web has changed from relatively static devices accessing it on an infrequent basis to an"always-on" mobile experience.As consumers, our digital lives have become richer, but as marketers, our digital lives have become far more complex. My ability to accesscontent and services over multiple devices makes it harder for organizations I interact with to understand and manage that experience or toevaluate the return on their marketing investment in me.Ive always believed that in digital analytics we are on a journey. That journey involves three main phases of performance tracking, processoptimization, and customer centricity. In the first phase were trying to get the numbers right. In the process optimization phase were trying toimprove our business processes. And customer centricity is where we focus on the customer rather than just the channel. You can see a fullerdescription of the journey in a previous column. Since I first formulated that framework, the landscape has evolved in the ways that I describedearlier, and being customer-centric is now not just about joining up the web channel with the offline channel, but having that holistic view acrossall digital channels as well as offline channels. The ability to understand a users interactions across all digital touch points and channels is whatis meant by "digital customer intelligence."
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 88At a recent conference here in the U.K., I co-presented with one of our customers who is a good example of the journey I describe above. Iveworked with this customer for over five years in a variety of different consultative positions. This has enabled me to see their evolution over aperiod of time. Their early days were all about establishing a coherent digital measurement capability. This meant getting the right systems in,and configuring them properly to produce the metrics and insight needed to run the business properly. This in turn meant investing in people,and gradually the digital analytics team grew from a team of one to six people today, which is pretty good by European standards.As the tracking and reporting capabilities were bedded into the business, the team started to focus on optimization activities. Theysystematically reviewed every part of the acquisition and conversion process across their multiple products. They used techniques such ascampaign attribution and multivariate testing to drive down costs and improve ROI. They were able to tune the fixed web channel to such anextent that they became one of the best in class within their sector according to independent benchmarking studies. They even started to lookat joining their web data to their call center data to understand multi-channel journeys.Then mobile usage started to take off. Within their sector mobile usage had a slow start, but then it expanded rapidly over the course of 12months or so to the point where the team needed to start to look at it in some detail to understand what was going on. What they found wasmixed. By looking at the demographics of people using mobile devices in their customer journey, they discovered that they were able to reachand appeal to people outside of their traditional customer profile. However, they also discovered that a significant number of mobile deviceusers were having a poor experience and so were abandoning their journey or having to deflect back into the fixed web channel or the contactcenter. So having spent time tuning the fixed web channel, they needed to start going through the tracking and optimization phases on themobile device channels to deliver the same level of user experience there as well and to provide a seamless integration of the two.The customer is now in the early stages of digital customer intelligence. A primary focus is on understanding customer interactions across allchannels across the total lifetime of that customer. While ensuring they dont drop the ball in terms of making sure that the individual digitalchannels remain well-optimized, theyre looking to understand how a digital visitors relationship develops with the business over time fromanonymous user to prospect to customer, across all devices and channels. Theyre bringing together data from different systems to understandthe relationships between the channels they use to acquire prospects and the channels that those prospects choose to use to becomecustomers. That integrated data gives them the ability to understand the value of the customer relationship over time in the context of theirdigital acquisition strategies.This story is by no means unique; a number of companies are pushing the boundaries of digital analytics and are actively doing many of thethings that Ive described above. Whats interesting is that this story is still relatively rare and that this company is not some huge globalbusiness with masses of resources at its disposal. Theyre a significant player in their sector for sure, but also one that has invested in ananalytics team and has created the environment to allow it to create business impact.I might have exaggerated at the beginning. I dont think that web analytics is necessarily dead, but it does depend on what is meant by thatterm. If by "web analytics" we mean aggregated reporting of activity across different digital channels with that data sitting in siloes, then I thinkit increasingly has a limited shelf life. If by "web analytics" we mean the collection of data on interactions across different digital channels anddevices and having that in an accessible format, then its going to be a fundamental component of your digital customer intelligence capabilitygoing forward.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 89The Acute Heptagram of ImpactNot as catchy a title as Maslows Hierarchy of Needs, but I hope youll walk through this with me:I can outline a strategy for you, but if you dont have the tactics in place or youre not skilled enough to execute, it wont matter if the strategyis a good one.Your projects success is going to be influenced in large measure by the reputation of the people who join in and the organization that brings itforward. Thats nothing you can completely change in a day, but its something that will change (like it or not) every day.None of this matters if you and your team dont persist, and your persistence will largely be driven by the desire you have to succeed, which ofcourse is relentlessly undermined by the fear we all wrestle with every day.These seven elements: Strategy, Tactics, Execution, Reputation, Persistence, Desire and Fear, make up the seven points of the acuteheptagram of impact. If your project isnt working, its almost certainly because one or more of these elements arent right. And in myexperience, its all of them. We generally pick the easiest and safest one to work on (probably tactics) without taking a deep breath andunderstanding where the real problem is.Feel free to share the AHI, but please dont have it tatooed on your hip or anything.Digital Video Ad Spend Up 18% So Far in 2012by Daisy Whitney, Oct 12, 2012, 12:00 PMVideo played its part in driving up Internet ad revenue so far this year, according to figures from the Interactive Advertising Bureau. Digitalvideo rose 18% in ad spend year over year for the first half of 2012, hitting more than $1 billion in revenue during that time, compared to nearly$900 million for the same six-month period last year.For its purposes, IAB categorizes digital video as part of display advertising. IAB’s figures are particularly useful to marketers because theyare based on actual money that’s already been spent, rather than what’s expected to be spent.But predictions are useful too for agencies and marketers. Here are a few handy figures on projected digital video ad spend.Also this week, Forrester said online video ad spending would grow from about $2.9 billion this year to $9 billion by 2017, for a 26% growthrate each year.Last week, media shop Zenith Optimedia said online video should rise 29% this year and another 29% next year.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 90Meanwhile, eMarketer has said that for all of 2012 digital video should reach $3 billion, a 40% rise over last year.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/185019/digital-video-ad-spend-up-18-so-far-in-2012.html?edition=52332#ixzz2P4jfl2KcStudy: Web Marketing More Than Twice Ad Spending Onlineby Mark Walsh, Oct 11, 2012, 12:22 PMA new report from Borrell Associates concludes that the Internet has become more of an advertising utility than an ad medium, given thedemand for services to maintain a presence across a wide range of digital platforms and devices.Underscoring that point, the media research firm estimates local businesses are spending two and a half times more on Web marketingservices than on online banners, pay-per-click keywords and video ads. That translates into $17,000 spent per small and-medium-sizedbusiness annually on online marketing, compared to $6,800 for online advertising.The Borrell report, ‚What SMBs Spend on Digital Marketing Services,‛ shows these businesses are dedicating 72% of their total onlinebudgets to marketing services, 15.6% to online promotions, and just 12.4% to online advertising.Drilling down on marketing services, the study estimates maintaining a Web presence accounts for about half (52%) of all spending, or $202billion this year. The other major categories include online public relations (12%), online marketing support (11.3%), online ad production (12.9%),and online consulting and research (12.1%).While businesses on average lay out $17,000 annually for online marketing services, those with less than 50 employees will spend less than$500 a year -- just enough for Web hosting and email list management. For a mid-sized company with more than 50 employees, that budgetshoots up to $63,000 a year, covering other areas like SEO, video production, public relations and social media.*Companies with over 5,000 employees account for the bulk of spending ($226.5 billion) in the $390 billion market for online marketingservices. Borrell groups the types of businesses benefiting from this growing spending into four groups:*Media companies: Tend to sell only ‚advertising‛ products and include dozens of players, including Yellowpages.com, Supermedia, DexOne,Hearst and Gannett.Local ad agencies: Manage a variety of marketing needs and typically buy advertising for local businesses, but slow to grasp opportunities indigital media.*Services companies: Offer everything from printing (VistaPrint and Deluxe Corp.) to small business loans (American Express) or payroll andaccounting services (Intuit/Quicken). All four companies now offer digital marketing services to customers.*Digital disruptors: Internet pure plays like Web.com, Local.com Yodle and Reputation.com. They typically sell services directly to SMBs throughtelemarketing or locally placed sales staffs.As part of the study, Borrell also looked at online spending in select categories -- auto, hospitals, restaurants -- in three local markets to give abetter sense of actual budgets. Car dealers in Atlantic City, for example, are spending $2 million on digital services this year. Nearly $900,000will go to Web hosting, $665,000 to Web design and maintenance, and $300,000 for online agency or exchange fees.Hospitals in Huntsville, AL have higher budgets -- $4.4 million -- but will also spend about half that for Web hosting, and the next-largest shareon site design and maintenance. The same pattern holds true for restaurants in Tucson, even though their annual spending on digital services isonly $701,000 on average.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 91Borrell conceded the difficulty in estimating spending for online services overall because vendors tend to bundle services. To deal with thatchallenge, the firm said it looked at marketing materials from service providers, examined financial documents, counted the number ofbusinesses offering each service, and reviewed available secondary research.1 comment on "Study: Web Marketing More Than Twice Ad Spending Online".1. Mike Einstein from the Brothers Einsteincommented on: October 12, 2012 at 4:21 p.m.The growing glut of intermediaries standing between brands and consumers calls to mind the Three Stooges in "A Plumbing We Will Go" inwhich ersatz plumber Curly mistakes an electrical conduit for a water pipe. As he pulls what seems to be never-ending wires out of the pipe heexclaims to Moe: "No wonder the water dont woik. These pipes are clogged up with wires!" To which Moe replies: A fine place for wires."Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/184973/study-web-marketing-more-than-twice-ad-spending-o.html?edition=52288#ixzz2P4jweJbWAmazon: No Profit On Hardware, Aims For Software MoniesBBC NewsIn stark contrast to Apple’s business model, Amazon admitted this week that it makes no profit off its Kindle Paperwhite and Kindle Fire HDdevices.‚We sell the hardware at our cost, so it is break-even on the hardware,‛ Amazon head Jeff Bezos told BBC News.‚A lot of technology products and gadgets are sold at break-even and at times even at a slight loss in order to make money off accessories orservices the go along with the products,‛ DailyTech notes.‚That selling hardware for no profit is certainly much different from Apples strategy … but not so different from videogame companies thathave traditionally sold their consoles … at a loss,‛ notes Gizmodo. ‚The thinking there is to make up the profit lost in the console with the costof games and peripherals.‛Similarly, said Bezos: "We want to make money when people use our devices, not when they buy our devices. The continuing relationship withthe customer is where we hope to make money over time."‚Amazon clearly just wants to provide a medium to consumers that can help deliver Amazon’s online content -- such as books and video --which have much higher profit margins,‛ according to Forbes.‚This doesnt exactly come as a surprise, but were glad that Jeffs confirmed our suspicions,‛ Engadget remarks.By contrast, ‚Apple reportedly makes around a 40% margin on its WiFi-based iPad, which is priced higher than a similarly configured and lessfeature-rich Amazon Kindle,‛ CNet writes.Starting an Unlikely Conversation: U by Kotex Wants People to Talkabout "The V Word"Published: January 17, 2013 at 1:50 AM PSTBy Ed Keller"Can We Talk . . . About Vaginal Myths?" Thats a headline that will catch ones attention. It certainly caught mine when it appeared recently inAd Age .The article is about the new marketing campaign from Kimberly-Clarks U by Kotex brand. "One might view this work as provocative," accordingto Melissa Sexton, integrated marketing planning director at K-C who was quoted in the article. "But its provocative not for the sake of beingprovocative, but because thats the way the honest conversation needs to happen."Conversation is what Kimberly ”Clark hopes to achieve, and if history for this brand is a guide the strategy will pay off.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 92There is a wide-spread belief that word-of-mouth marketing works only in "exciting" categories, like technology, cars, restaurants, travel andmovies. But the fact is that word of mouth can work for everyday products and brands in a whole host of categories -- even tampons, as U byKotex has demonstrated since it launched the brand in 2010.A Social Strategy Starts With Ideas Worth Sharing, Not Technology PlatformsAs Brad Fay and I discovered when we profiled Kotex for The Face-to-Face Book , the phenomenally successful launch of the tampon brand Uby Kotex teaches many of the most important lessons about social marketing. What is significant is that the lessons are not about how todesign and execute a Facebook or Twitter strategy; its not a technology-driven strategy, and the metrics that matter are not about the numberof fans or followers. Rather, its about a marketing strategy that starts with a powerful idea, one with which the target audience can getengaged and feel motivated to share.Kimberly-Clark realized several years back that feminine hygiene products were a rather quiet category, both literally and figuratively. Therehad been little innovation in decades. Traditionally its a category that women did not feel comfortable talking about. Advertising and marketingin the category was long based on breezy images of snowy, white purity and euphemistic language about "freshness" and "protection." TinaFey joked in her book Bossypants, "I had noticed something was weird earlier in the day, but I knew from the commercials that ones menstrualperiod was a blue liquid you poured like laundry detergent into maxi pads to test their absorbency; this wasnt blue, so . . . I ignored it for a fewhours."Kimberly-Clark executives believed that societys unwillingness to talk honestly about vaginal health and menstruation was a serious matterwith the potential to lead to bad health decisions and outcomes by teenagers unable to get the information they needed. The crucial idea behindU by Kotex was that feminine protection should not be a taboo subject. Not only should women feel comfortable talking about it, but thecategory could even become fashionable. U by Kotexs packaging and applicators were designed to be colorful, and its marketing would breakthe cycle of euphemistic advertising and communications about the category. Tampons ” and vaginal health generally ” would becomeacceptable topics for conversation. The launch of the campaign was designed to encourage honest conversation and to provide essentialhealth and how-to-information to young women.U by Kotex was launched in the US in March 2010, jumping from zero to a 5.5 percent share of the tampon market by the following spring,while also increasing the overall Kotex share by 2.5 points to a total of 18.2. This was a stunning success in a marketing that hadnt seen aserious product innovation since Tampax Pearl ten years earlier.From a word of mouth perspective, my firms research found that the Kotex family of brands increased their share of category conversationsamong females 13 ” 44 from 20% in 2008 to 32% in the first half of 2011. The brand was succeeding in driving people to talk. The newcampaign is the successor to this initial strategy and takes the conversation a step further.The Commercial IdeaIn writing the book, we had the opportunity to talk with company executives plus the agencies involved in the campaign. They talked about theimportance of the "commercial idea" which is the starting point for new products at K-C. In effect, they want the innovation itself to betalkworthy„that is, unique and worthy of being recommended„rather than a slightly new product variation with "new and improved" stampedon it, or a clever television commercial. In their minds, the marketing then flows out of that new commercial idea. And so does the socialsharing, both offline and online. "Right from the start, we believed it was about word of mouth," we were told by Kimberly-Clarks Jay Gottlieb,VP of adult and feminine care marketing, recalling the development of U by Kotex.If Kimberly-Clark can achieve word-of-mouth success in the feminine hygiene category, no marketer can be excused from doing the workrequired to achieve the same in their own marketplace.Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, has been called "one of the most recognized names in word of mouth." His new book, The Face-to-FaceBook: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace, was recently published by Free Press/Simon & Schuster. You can follow Ed Kelleron Twitter, Facebook and Google+, or contact him directly at ekeller@kellerfay.com.Classic Jack: One Year Ahead of The Times and Ad AgePublished: February 6, 2013 at 12:35 AM PSTBy Jack MyersIn the context of two articles published by The New York Times and Advertising Age on Sunday, January 13, its appropriate to share (below)these two commentaries published exclusively for Jack Myers Media Business Report members on February 27, 2012, plus similarcommentaries on the same topics published earlier this year. I remain focused on providing Jack Myers Media Business Report members withadvanced insights and market intelligence that consistently remain well ahead of traditional trade and consumer press sources. For membershipinformation visit www.jackmyers.com. The Times and Ad Age articles were:After Rocky Year for Start-Ups, Investors Are Pickier
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 93Solving the Content Creation ConundrumFROM JACK MYERS MEDIA BUSINESS REPORTFebruary 27, 2012Digital Economic Collapse and VC Funding Shifts are on the HorizonFebruary 27, 2012: As always, there will be new entries into the marketplace that will disrupt the already volatile status quo. Of greatereconomic concern for the thousands of VC companies that litter the digital landscape, is the economic restructuring of the media industry thatwill redirect VCs to other business categories as their funds decline in value, as their investments consolidate with unproductive valuations,and as uncompetitive investments are forced to shutter or shrink. It is increasingly apparent that there will be a fundamental restructuring ofearly and mid-stage companies that have yet to achieve profitability as investors can no longer justify additional capital. For now, venturecapital is still flowing, but the spigot is closing. For some companies, it might close in the next several days and weeks as the demand forprofitability and return- on-investment intensifies. Tech has become a commodity, available to customers at a fraction of its real value due toan over-population of competitors, all marginalizing the business. Some stand-outs have staying power, but the possibility that they mightcollapse under their own success is just as real. Equity capital is becoming attractive again, and most legacy media companies are performingreasonably well, shifting the emphasis of value investors away from the venture market and toward legacy media companies that have strongestablished businesses with digital growth layered on.Investor Focus Shifts to Content and ContextFROM JACK MYERS MEDIA BUSINESS REPORT February 27, 2012February 27, 2012: Venture capital investors, in general, are locked into rigid patterns and decades-old decision-making, opening the doors fora new wave of investors who have a fresh vision of the future and of opportune growth markets. These investors will be more interested in thecontent and context oriented business models that capitalize on the cheap availability of technology to drive distribution, deliver advertiservalue, measure performance, and generate consumer engagement and loyalty. The technology infrastructure to support advertising and mediabusinesses for the next decade has largely been built-out. Yes, there will be advances but the technology-based venture opportunities in thisbusiness have been largely played out. Many VCs will simply shift their focus to other business categories, but those who remain loyal to themedia community will look toward underserved markets that technology has enabled. Digital media and advertising businesses will be mostappealing in the future to VCs when they focus on communicating effectively with actively engaged consumers by:“ delivering valued and engaging content ” especially video, social content and mobile;“ organizing content based on both the individual and group needs and interests of targeted and well-defined audiences;“ targeting currently underserved markets, such as local neighborhoods, interest groups, ethnically cohesive groups, discreet consumerpockets;“ integrating content across multiple platforms using video, social marketing, commerce, direct marketing, event and experientialmarketing resources.And, in my first Jack Myers Media Business Report of 2013, I added these commentaries on technological overload and marketers growingfocus on content and earned media.TECHNOLOGICAL OVERLOADFROM JACK MYERS MEDIA BUSINESS REPORTJanuary 7, 2013Terry Kawajas Lumascapes charts include an estimated 1,500 venture-funded companies. As Terrys groupings clearly demonstrate, there isexcessive overlap and redundancy in almost every category.Venture capitalists typically have four walls around the box they ask companies to fit into:“ a qualified (and mostly youthful) team;“ a proprietary technology;
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 94“ a clearly defined marketplace need and potentially hockey-stick revenue model;“ and an exit strategy.With the average VC-funded company now taking nine to ten years to reach an exit, that requirement has clearly become moot withexpectations unmet. The abundance of VC-funded companies in every part of the digital media space battling it out with minimal competitiveadvantage makes it apparent the third wall has come crashing down. The vast majority of media entrepreneurs who first introduced their ideasto VCs have been bounced out of the companies they founded, and are now known by the seemingly positive, but increasingly demeaning term,serial entrepreneur. Few have even one success under their belt. So wall one is still followed but mostly irrelevant.So that leaves us with wall two: a proprietary technology. This of course is preposterous. Unless the business is designed to own and sellpatents, there is little protection offered by proprietary technology. In fact, the greatest financial drag on digital companies has been the needto maintain technological leadership and relevance. Yes, proprietary technology is valuable, but its lasting impact on the business and revenuegrowth is negligible unless the resources are available for continued aggressive technological development, implementation, sales andmarketing. Thats the advantage Google has and the conundrum Yahoo! finds itself in today, along with the vast majority of the companiesincluded in Terrys Lumascapes. Companies have been funded based on models and assumptions that bear little connection to the real world,and they now find themselves at a standstill, unable to expand without significant added capital; unable to clearly define or market a uniqueselling proposition; unable to merge or consolidate because 2 + 2 would need to equal about 16 to satisfy investors; and unable to scale backto gain profitability because the goal has only to do with achieving an exit for investors who are under water ” and little to do with building aviable small and sustainable business.This represents an incredibly opportune marketplace for buyers, a reality that Sir Martin Sorrell of WPP has understood and that agencyholding companies will focus on in 2013 and 2014. Marketers and media companies should move now and quickly to identify and acquire (orpartner with) the best of breed in the categories in which they will need to compete effectively in 2013 and for decades into the future. Thereis an ecosystem waiting to be exploited. There are 8,000 to 12,000 media and advertising-related service companies today in search of anexit. Those included in Lumascapes are the most successful, but not the only ones in need of a new forward-looking business model. Theyvebeen built on misguided principles and false hopes, and with billions of dollars in venture funding that is now drying up. They are part of thefirst ecosystem in history that has been funded primarily with little or no promise of support from the industry they serve. Some of thesecompanies have been built on technology but by management teams and advisors who actually understand and support the short and long-termfundamentals of marketing and media. These are the golden nuggets that will drive the business forward, and are the gems acquirers shouldseek out.A failure to comprehend these fundamentals is the basic reason that Facebook, Twitter and hundreds of other "successful" companies arestruggling to create a business model from scratch. We are grateful to the system that has enabled this and were confident many of thesecompanies will be rewarded for their success, even if it materializes more slowly than expected. But for those seeking to move forward in2013, its essential to recognize the future of technology is not the "next new thing." Success in the future depends on understanding the newmarketing, advertising and media ecosystem that technology has created, its implications for your future, and how to most economically andeffectively apply existing technologies to assure continued business success and revenue growth.HAVE YOUR EARNED WEAPONS READY FOR THE CONTENT REVOLUTIONGE has been at the forefront of this movement, underwriting multiple content-based campaigns, the most visible of which can be viewed atwww.focusforwardfilms.com * Johnson & Johnson armed itself early with an investment in Baby Center Unilever, P&G, Coca-Cola and manyother companies have investments in relevant content, but the core underpinnings of the content revolution will leave most marketers andmedia companies, including some that believe they are investing appropriately, struggling to comprehend why they failed to prepare and howtheir management so grossly neglected the need to arm themselves with the basic competitive tools required to communicate in the future. Thetelevision industry has done a good job of responding to the expansion of digital distribution. Unlike print media and, until recently, radio, TVnetworks responded early to the competitive threat and have engaged, built, invested in and produced for digital.Yet, theyre still not as prepared as theyll need to be to prepare for the inevitable erosion of network program ratings, the continuedchallenges to local broadcast station superiority, the affiliate model and the accelerated fragmentation of viewing options. All of these issues,though, have been well-charted and come as no surprise. What companies have not been preparing for, although the indications are very clear,is the reality of earned media: aka unpaid media distribution and exposure.Branded entertainment and product placement are the most visibly effective models, following on the same approaches the print industry hastaken with custom magazine publishing and special newspaper sections and supplements. But most of these content initiatives are clearly anddefinitively designed as advertising and with marketing messages an integrated and integral component of the communication.A new approach, spearheaded by GE, is branding-through-association rather than integration. Similar to the advantages gained through sportssponsorships and concert promotions, the key difference is that the vast majority of future branding-through-association models will rely onearned media, requiring little or no paid media exposure.Cinelan, the company behind the GE initiative, specializes in engaging well-known documentary filmmakers to produce short form films thatrespond to brand "briefs" and also respond to consumer interests and passions, as well as the passions of the filmmakers themselves. Thirtyof the Cinelan filmmakers, who include several Academy Award winners, produced 30 three-minute films under the Focus Forward umbrella and
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 95available for viewing at the Focus Forward site, as well as YouTube, Vimeo and other distribution platforms. The films, along with 90 additionalfilms produced through a Focus Forward film competition, have generated millions of views and shares, all earned. GEs brand association is alogo at the beginning and end, but the company has no branding or product integration within the films themselves. Many of the films havepremiered and been exhibited at leading film festivals worldwide, including Sundance and Tribeca.While there are obvious costs related to content development and production, plus distribution costs, new economics are evolving that enablemarketers to recoup some of these costs through back-end rights, non-competitive advertising integration, and international exploitation.This is just one of many future models that digital creative, distribution and production technologies are enabling and that will progressivelyerode the basics of the traditional paid media model. TV networks and content studios will not disappear. In fact, my forecasts argue thatbroadcast and cable network TV will continue to expand, with advertising revenues remaining strong through the end of this decade. But allmedia and marketers must begin to arm themselves with new message creation and distribution strategies that respond to audiences that arefar less likely to conform to traditional patterns and far more likely to consume media from highly fragmented and disparate sources.I refer to it as Soundtrack Economics. Video viewing will evolve into a Pandora-like model, constantly on. Always in the background.Occasionally elevated to "like" status and shared. Breaking through with ad messages will be difficult ” even impossible ” without creativecontent-based strategies and tactics yet to be conceived. Its incumbent upon the marketplace to begin arming for this inevitable future.*Disclosure: Jack Myers is a partner in Cinelan, which developed and implemented the GE Focus Forward program.The five types of men: Which one are you?Scarlett Russell “ AskMen “ November 30, 2012 2:40PMThere are five categories of men youre likely to encounter while dating. Picture: ThinkstockYESTERDAY, I listed five types of women that all men will encounter at one stage or another in their dating lives.The five types of women - which one are you?Time to turn the focus onto you men. Now, I’m not saying all men fall into these categories, but I’m sure all women will agree that there aresome familiar characters we just can’t escape. We’ve all dated these guys at least once. And we probably wouldn’t want to again. Any of thesesound familiar? You better read on. And heed my advice. Its for your own good, boys...The Failed FrontmanThe Failed Frontman. Picture: Thinkstock
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 96I’m sure your school band was definitely going to ‘make it’ and learning (Whats The Story?) Morning Glory all the way through on guitar madeyou the hottest guy in year 12. We digged it, dude. But, 15 years on, the closest you’ve come to being Pete Doherty is headlining an open micnight at your local pub and sharing too many spliffs with your 55-year-old landlord. Your hero may be Mick Jagger, but you’re in danger ofbecoming more like Ned Rocknroll. A man who changed his surname to Rocknroll. Give it up and get a proper job.The Marrying KindThe Marrying Kind. Picture: ThinkstockAll your friends are paired off, your Facebook profile consists of pictures of your twin nephews and we were introduced to your parents ondate three. It’s great that you know what you want, but make sure the girl you’re dating wants the same thing, otherwise it can be a little scary.Problem is, you actually fall for independent women who youre determined to change into marriage-lovers by your first Valentines Day. Notgoing to happen. Next time you meet someone, just enjoy their company for a bit and see where it leads.The Professional Party Boy
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 97The Professional Party Boy. Picture: ThinkstockYour business card reads, ‘Events Director’ when, really, all you do is gather those braying girls from the boarding school you know to come toyour mate’s club nights. That’s how we met you. And we had an exciting, fun-filled fling which featured a summer in Ibiza. You’re the guy thatother guys want to be mates with (because youre rich and get them into clubs) and all the girls fancy, but long-term relationships won’t be easyif you’re out all night every weekend. I mean, I’m all for a party, but in a real relationship there has to be a balance.The PlayerThe Player. Picture: ThinkstockAll women fall for The Player at some point. You’re charming and confident, with just the right amount of arrogance: a fatal trio of attributes forany unsuspecting female. If you’re young, free and adorable then crack on. But, if you’re pushing 40 and still think game-playing, breakinghearts and even cheating is cool, I’m here to tell you it really isn’t. The lovely girls you discarded are probably happily settled now and youmissed out. Maybe it’s time to grow up.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 98The Older ManThe Older Man. Picture: ThinkstockProbably because we took one look at blokes our age and saw a relationship consisting of Pot Noodle-dinners with emotionally stunted man-kids who still insist that skateboards are a viable means of transportation. Then we dated a guy 12 years older and soon realised that nomatter how old men are, their emotions are still kind of stunted. They just drive nicer cars.Read more: http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/the-five-types-of-men-which-one-are-you/story-fnet0gly-1226527533781#ixzz2IGAbkcfQThe five types of women - by a womanBy Scarlett Russell “ AskMen “ November 29, 2012 2:42PM
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 99Domestic Goddess, Girly Girl or Career Woman? Picture: ThinkstockStart of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.Related Coverage“ Bella lacks role model credentials“ Banker rated dates on spreadsheet“ When Girl Power grows up“ The manly man wearing the baby sling“ Woman subjected to 10-day rape ordealEnd of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.I DONT know how many of you have seen HBOs brilliant drama Girls but, essentially, its the anti-Sex and the City; a comedy about four 20-something women living in New York and struggling with jobs, boyfriends and the rest of it.Its the closest a TV show has come to depicting the distinct personalities of different women - good, bad and ugly. Whilst it would beimpossible and insulting to claim all women fall into categories, there are, and Im sure fellow females would agree, a few similar characters youwill all encounter at some point.The Girls GirlIm definitely a Girls Girl. I clapped when Ross and Rachel finally kissed, I have a pink iPod case and work on a womens magazine. But I alsobanter with my male friends, play pool and love The Who. Note: The GG is not ‘girlie, a derogatory term which brings to mind braided hair and aMy Little Pony lunchbox (although, I totally had one of those. But, crucially: when I was 8. Not 28).Most likely to say: "Amaze."Least likely to say: "Wow. Its pretty incredible that Chelsea managed to conquer Barcelona at the Nou Camp. And without talismanic skipper,John Terry, too."Impress her by: Being nice to her friends. Ask them questions and buy them drinks.The Career Woman
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 100Most women I know are extremely ambitious, independent and hard-working. From my experience, many men find this impossibly attractive.There are some women, however, who put their career so far beyond their personal life that, whilst theyre incredibly successful, boyfriendstend to fall at the wayside. Be prepared to come second, at least for the time-being.Spends weekends: In the office.Least likely to say: "Ive been planning my dream wedding since I was tiny."Impress her by: Talking passionately, but not arrogantly, about your job.The Domestic GoddessSomegirls are just the epitome of wife and mother material. Picture: Ella PellegriniAs my friends and I edge closer to 30, theres inevitably more talk of ‘the future, but one friend in particular has had babies and boyfriends onthe brain for years. Shes naturally maternal, selfless and can cook anything. In short, total wife-and-mother-material. Shes looking for a manwho is kind, gentle, likes dogs and abides cats.Spends weekends: At the farmers marketWouldnt be seen dead in: A City barImpress her by: A date at a quaint pub; the kind that makes its own cider.The Drama QueenA colleague sheepishly admitted recently that she started a row with her boyfriend for no reason. "I just wanted some drama." We all nodded inagreement. Women often do this and its probably happened to you. Dont worry about it. These tiffs are actually pretty funny. When thingskick off all the time, thats your cue to leave.Spends weekends: In a packed bar, tweeting about conversations as they happenMost likely say: "It literally was the worst thing EVER"Impress her by: Telling her when shes being ridiculous. Drama Queens like men who can hold their own.The Guys Girl
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 101Some girls just prefer hanging out with men. Picture: ThinkstockYou know the one. She only hangs around with men, claiming women "dont really like her" when in fact theyre just irked that she flirts withtheir boyfriends and makes no effort whatsoever at female bonding. Shes sharp, funny and can sum up the offside rule in one sentence. But -and this is a monumental but - be wary of a girl that has no girlfriends.Spends weekends: Down the pubWouldnt be seen dead in: A hen partyImpress her by: Quips, banter and Rocky quotes. She likes a cheeky, cocky Alpha Male.And to quote my favourite ever line from Sex and the City; "Im not being a bitch, Im just being myself." Never was there a more tellingsummary of modern woman.Read more: http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/the-five-types-of-women-by-a-woman/story-fnet0gly-1226526477699#ixzz2IGBDgd2c3 Ways to Get People to ChangeJANUARY 9, 2013You can change strategy, products, and processes all you want, but real change doesnt take hold until your employees actually change whatthey do every day. Thats easier said than done. Here are three ways to take on the challenge:“ Embrace the power of one. People need clear direction. If you bombard them with eight values or twelve competencies you want themto practice, expect the status quo. Instead, focus on changing one behavior at a time.“ Paint a vivid picture. Use stories, metaphors, pictures, and physical objects to compare "where we are now" to the new vision of thefuture. This taps into peoples emotions, a powerful lever for change.“ Activate peer pressure. Peers can set expectations, shame others, or provide role models. Ask your employees to set high standardsand put pressure on one another to stick to the new ruleThe Key to Branded Apps Is to Uncover Their Consumer UtilityJames Dohnert | January 25, 2013 | 0 Comments
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 102To get the most out of an app, brands must discover how they can be most useful to their consumers, according to a panel of experts whospoke this year at the Mobile Media Summit in San Francisco.According to the panel, brands have to craft apps in a way that will get consumers to keep coming back to them. The panel says that brandsneed to think about their apps just like they are any other product. The group also felt that combining a brand with an already successful appcan pay solid dividends for consumer awareness."If 2012 was about getting the app download, then 2013 will be about bringing utility to your device," said chief product officer at JumptapAdam Soroca during a panel discussion at the summit.According to Soroca, brands need to move past the idea that downloads equal success in the branded app marketplace. Soroca believes thatusage rates are a better barometer for app success.During the panel Soroca also preached the value of creating an app that creates cross-platform awareness. He said that apps need to be usedas a jumping-off point for getting consumers interested in other advertising channels."Think about the app as a starting point to really get out and into those other channels," continued Soroca.Soroca said during the panel that brands can get a lot out of their apps by using them to leverage other advertising platforms. As an example,the panel shared the idea of using a smartphone or tablet as a second screen to supplement television watching as a good option for cross-platform advertising.To make it easier for brands, Soroca also said that firms should consider partnering with pre-existing app developers to get the most out oftheir mobile applications."We see a lot of better apps when our clients are working with our partners like Rovio who makes Angry Birds," said Soroca.In the end, the panel continued to hammer home the point that brands cant think about apps as just a throwaway advertising platform. Thepanel said that brands need to treat apps just like they would any other product."I dont think its any different than getting someone to buy a new tube of toothpaste," said chief innovation officer at Mediabrands QuentinGeorge while taking part in the panel.HTML5 vs. Apps: Heres Why The Debate Matters, And Who Will WinBusiness Insider | Feb. 3, 2013, 8:51 PM | 222,430 | 78HTML5 is a new technology that allows developers to build rich web-based apps that run on any device via a standard web browser.Many think it will save the web, rendering native platform-dependent apps obsolete.So, which will win? Native apps or HTML5?
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 103A recent report from BI Intelligence explains why we think HTML5 will win out, and what an HTML future will look like for consumers,developers, and brands.Access The Full Report By Signing Up For A Free Trial Today >>Heres why the Apps-vs-HTML5 debate matters:“ Distribution: Native apps are distributed through app stores and markets controlled by the owners of the platforms. HTML5 isdistributed through the rules of the open web: the link economy.“ Monetization: Native apps come with one-click purchase options built into mobile platforms. HTML5 apps will tend to be monetizedmore through advertising, because payments will be less user-friendly.“ Platform power and network effects: Developers have to conform with Apples rules. Apples market share, meanwhile, createsnetwork effects and lock-in. If and when developers can build excellent iPhone and iPad functionality on the web using HTML5, developers cancut Apple out of the loop. This will reduce the network effects of Apples platform.“ Functionality: Right now, native apps can do a lot more than HTML5 apps. HTML5 apps will get better, but not as fast as some HTML5advocates think.In full, the special report analyzes:“ What HTML5 is, giving an overview of how it is a technology done by committee.“ Why the HTML5-vs-Apps debate matters, breaking down its impact on distribution, monetization, platform power and networkeffects, and functionality.“ The pluses and minuses of HTML5 vs. native apps, comparing each by cost, user experience, features, distribution, and monetization.“ How and when HTML5 will take over, laying out how it has all the hallmarks of a disruptive technology.“ The success of an HTML5 pioneer, The Financial Times.“ What an HTML5 future will look like, with the promise of richer and more interactive experiences.Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/html5-vs-apps-heres-why-the-debate-matters-and-who-will-win-2012-12#ixzz2P4ok5iUgWhat Brazilians Will Buy in 2013BY LUCIANO RODRIGUES@USMEDIACONSULTING.COM ON JANUARY 18, 2013 INADVERTISING, BRAZIL, ECONOMY, MARKETINGThis post is also available in: SpanishRecently, we covered what Brazilians were buying in 2012, highlighting strong sales in a variety of product categories. But now IBOPE is sharingthe results of a new study of 27 million Brazilian households that looked at their buying habits.According to the study’s results, here are the top products that Brazilians reported buying during the past 12 months:“ Cell phone 20%“ TV 11%“ Computer/notebook 9%“ Digital camera 6%“ Refrigerator 5%“ DVD player 4%Here’s what Brazilians plan to buy this year:
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 104“ TV 8%“ Cell phone 5%“ Computer/notebook 5%“ Refrigerator 5%“ Washing machine 5%“ Microwave oven 4%“ Digital camera 3%Along for the RideHowever, these weren’t the only products on the shopping lists of Brazilians in 2013. The survey found that 29% of the 71 million Braziliansliving in metropolitan areas plan to buy a car in 2013. In terms of socioeconomic class, 37% of Brazilians from classes AB plan on buying a carin 2013, while 25% of class C Brazilians and 17% of classes DE Brazilians plan on buying a car this year.Most Influential Media for Brazilian Car BuyersWhen it comes to information sources that impact the purchase decision with a car, for class AB Brazilians the top media are direct mailpromotions (76%), magazines (74%) and Internet (70%). Interestingly, radio (57%), newspapers (56%) and out of home media (56%) hadgreater influence on the auto purchase decisions of class AB Brazilians than TV (47%).For class C, which now totals 103 million people and will have more purchasing power in 2015 than classes A and B combined, out of home wasthe form of media (44%) that most influenced their car buying decision. In second place were radio (43%), followed by TV (42%), newspapers(41%), Internet (30%) and magazines (23%).For classes DE, TV was the form of media that most impacted their auto purchase decision (11%), while the other forms of media generatedsingle-digit responses.Feliz 2020Já estamos no finalzinho de 2012 e sempre temos a mesma sensação de que o tempo está passando mais rápido do que nunca. Acho que éisso mesmo, estamos girando mais rápidos do que nunca.Nossa mente processa muito mais coisas ao mesmo tempo, estamos lidando com muito mais assuntos ao mesmo tempo, lidando commudanças a todo momento, consumidores mais exigentes do que nunca. Ufa, imagina nos próximos anos? E nessa loucura ainda temos que nospreparar para estarmos preparados pro futuro.Lidar com mudanças, inclusive, é a primeira tendência listada no report do Planet Retail para 2020. Achei uma ótima leitura para quem estáfechando o planejamento dos próximos anos. Segue um breve resumo das 10 tendências pro varejo para 2020:1 ” Flexibilidade: de formatos, canais, modelos de abastecimento para crescer num mercado cada vez mais desafiador, onde grandes formatosde lojas já não trazem tanto retorno, o ecommerce avançando e tirando mercado do varejo físico, novos formatos de lojas surgindo e ademanda por uma oferta cross canal.2 ” Internacionalização dos mercados emergentes: varejistas internacionais cada vez mais expandindo e entrando nos mercados emergentese, os players locais, também investindo em outros mercados, fora da sua região.3 ” Mycommerce: a força que os consumidores terão nas relações com os varejistas cada vez maior. A busca por conveniência, melhoresofertas e serviços em alta com apoio da tecnologia.4 ” Polarização do mercado: a crise econômica e as mudanças demográficas impactando no comportamento dos consumidores. Os modelosque melhor devem performar nesse novo cenário são os focados em desconto/preço baixo e no outro extremo osespecializados/diferenciados.5 ” Direto pro Consumidor: as marcas construíndo seus próprios canais de venda direta pro consumidor. Novos canais estão surgindo (comopop up stores, venda direta pela fanpage ou marketplace de venda direta pro cliente) demandando uma mudança de modelo para os varejistas.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 1056 ” Nostalgia: instabilidade econômica e a globalização impulsionando as marcas e varejistas a resgatar a história, o simples, através do usode logomarcas e embalagens antigas, trazendo mais segurança e um contato mais emocional com o consumidor.7 - Mercado Local: consumidores demandando conteúdo mais relevante, mais próximo, e interação maior com varejistas. Uma das grandestendências é a abertura de páginas de lojas nas redes sociais sendo atualizadas pelas próprias lojas e não por uma central.8 ” Varejo da Comunidade: também relacionado a tendência de fortalecer o conteúdo local, ou seja, deixar de pensar como uma corporação edar autonomia as regionais inclusive mudando nome das lojas e adaptando logomarcas. Outra questão é a valorização da atitude maistransparente e interativa, e do pensamento coletivo, no bem para o próximo e para o mundo.9 ” Engajamento Digital: outra frente fortíssima impulsionada pela tecnologia. Nesse tópico entram as questões de promover açõesdiferenciadas e interativas aproximando a marca das pessoas dentro ou fora das lojas. Integração e convergência dos canais on e off-line.10 ” Logística como diferenciador: e para concluir a última tendência reforça a necessidade de construir uma infraestrutura robusta parasuportar todas essas mudanças e integrações de canais. A logística como elemento essencial para entregar com qualidade, velocidade egarantir sortimento.É isso aí. Muita coisa pra fazer, pra viver e aprender.Feliz 2020 para todos nós!Leia Mais: http://www.meioemensagem.com.br/home/marketing/ponto_de_vista/2012/12/20/Feliz-2020.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=mmbymail-geral&utm_content=Dez+tend%EAncias+para+o+varejo+em+2020#ixzz2P4q1Ou3cFollow us: @meioemensagem on Twitter | Meioemensagem on FacebookA comScore Lança o Relatório ‗2013 Brazil Digital Future in Focus‘Usuários Brasileiros da Internet Passam 27 Horas Online por Mês, Mais que Qualquer Outro Mercado Latino-AmericanoSão Paulo, Brasil, 7 de Março, 2013 ” comScore, Inc. (NASDAQ: SCOR), líder global em medições e análises digitais, hoje divulga o relatório2013 Brazil Digital Future in Focus. Este relatório anual examina como as tendências predominantes no uso da web, mídia social, video online,anúncios digitais, dispositivos móveis e buscas estão definindo o mercado atual e como eles tendem a tomar forma para esse próximo ano.Principais tendências e destaques serão apresentados por um webinar complementar ao vivo no dia 14 de março, quinta-feira, às 15h (hora SãoPaulo). Esta sessão será transmitida em Português. Para mais informações, favorvisitar:http://www.comscore.com/por/Insights/Events_and_Webinars/Webinar/2013/2013_Brazil_Digital_Future_in_Focus‚O cenário digital Brasileiro mostrou uma mudança significativa em 2012, causada pela forte ascensão das Redes Sociais‛ declara Alex Banks,director executivo da comScore para o Brasil & Vice-Presidente na América Latina. ‚À medida que esses veículos continuem a crescer, estarãopromovendo novas e excitantes oportunidades para meios de publicação que querem atrair audiências e empresas que desejam alcançarconsumidores.‛Principais insights do relatório 2013 Brazil Digital Future in Focus (#FiFBrasil) incluem:“ Consumidores no Brasil passam mais de 27h por mês online em seus computadores, representando a média mais alta deenvolvimento de todos os 8 mercados latino-americanos analisados. (Fonte: comScore Media Metrix)“ A audiência da internet no Brasil continua relativamente jovem, com 18% dos usuários com idades entre 18-24 anos e 30% entre 25-34. (Fonte: comScore Media Metrix)“ Telefones celulares e tablets estão se tornando mais importantes no cenário da internet brasileiro. Visualizações de páginas emdispositivos que não são PCs (por exemplo, smartphones e tablets) bateram um recorde, com quase 6% dos page views totais consumidospelos brasileiros durante Dezembro 2012 . (Fonte: comScore Device Essentials)“ O Retail online continua a crescer no Brasil, com o número total de visualizações de página de categoria alcançando 9% de aumentodurante 2012. Mercado Livre continua sendo a principal propriedade de Retail, alcançando mais de 14 milhões de visitantes em Dezembro.(Fonte: comScore Media Metrix)“ A publicidade online está em ascensão, com mais de 789 bilhões de impressões de anúncios dedisplayentregadas durante 2012.Portais e redes sociais são as duas maiores categorias de conteúdo que fornecem estes anúncios, representando, em total, 45% do mercado.Dafiti.com.br foi o maior anunciante online no Brasil em 2012, com mais de 25 bilhões de impressões.(Fonte: comScore Ad Metrix)
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 106“ Sites de Redes Sociais capturam a maior porcentagem do tempo dos consumidores no Brasil, com 36%. O Facebook ascendeu comoum forte líder da categoria, com quase 44 milhões de visitantes únicos em dezembro de 2012, 22% a mais que no ano anterior. (Fonte:comScore Media Metrix)“ O consumo de vídeo online no Brasil cresceu 18% em 2012. Google Sites (YouTube) continua sendo o principal site de video,enquanto VEVO ficou em segundo lugar. Facebook foi uma das propriedades de vídeo com crescimento mais rápido, com um crescimento demais de 400%. (Fonte: comScore Video Metrix)Webinar ComplementarJunte-se a Alex Banks, diretor executivo da comScore para o Brasil & Vice-Presidente na América Latina, na quinta-feira, 14 de março, ocasiãoem que ele irá compartilhar os principais insights do relatório2013Brazil Digital Future in Focuse discutirá o que essas tendências significampara anunciantes e empresas em 2013.Para registrar-se para a sessão em Inglês do webinar, favorvisitar:http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Events_and_Webinars/Webinar/2013/2013_Brazil_Digital_Future_in_FocusPara registrar-se para a sessão em Português do webinar, favorvisitar:http://www.comscore.com/por/Insights/Events_and_Webinars/Webinar/2013/2013_Brazil_Digital_Future_in_FocusQuem é você nas redes sociais?13 de dezembro de 2012 “ 17h00Recentemente foi concluída a maior pesquisa quantitativa já realizada no Brasil para entender quem são os brasileiros nas redes sociais, quaisseus temas favoritos, os temas odiados, como os homens e mulheres estão agrupados, como são suas relações com amigos, seguidores emarcas, entre outros pontos. O estudo foi realizado pela Hello Research - agência brasileira de inteligência e pesquisa de mercadoespecializada na metodologia OnTarget - a partir de 1,3 mil entrevistas pessoais domiciliares feitas em 70 cidades espalhadas por todas asregiões do País.Intitulado de ‚Papo Social‛, o estudo revela as opiniões, formas de comportamento e os principais temas procurados em canais comoFacebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Twitter, MSN, Google Plus, Tumblr, Myspace e YouTube. A partir daí foram avaliados os principais temas deprocura de seus usuários, tais como futebol, religião, política, trabalho, novela, auto-ajuda, humor e sexo.Assim, concluiu-se que, do total de entrevistados, 1/3 se declarou usuário de, pelo menos, uma rede social, tendo esta sido acessada pelomenos uma vez nos últimos 90 dias. E o Facebook lidera a preferência nacional, sendo a mais usada em todas as regiões e níveis sócio-econômicos, com a adesão de 84% dos usuários, ou em números absolutos, 55 milhões de pessoas. Um detalhe importante: 60% destesusuários ainda usam o MSN e mais da metade utiliza o Orkut, principalmente nas classes DE.No que se refere às regiões do Brasil, o Sudeste concentra a maior parte dos usuários, com 55% dos representantes, seguido pelo Nordeste(20%), Sul (12%), Norte (7%) e Centro-Oeste (6%). Nesta última localidade também são encontrados os ‚Heavy Users‛, isto é, aqueles quededicam grande parte de seus dias à navegação pelas redes sociais. Aproximadamente 36% se mantém conectados durante todo o dia,enquanto que 32% dedicam pelo menos um momento de seus dias a entrar no Facebook e demais canais de interação social. Fato curiosoocorre no Norte onde não se conectam o dia todo, mas 35% dos usuários se conectam todos os dias, patamar superior às demais regiões.Outra particularidade do estudo foi identificar comportamentos de navegação similares entre usuários para poder segmentá-los a partir decaracterísticas comuns significativas. Com esse exercício a pesquisa apontou os quatro principais grupos de usuários de redes sócias no país.São eles:EM 1º COM 30% - ‚OS ARROZ DE FESTA‛Esse grupo é formado por indivíduos que estão presentes em todas as discussões. Aliás, não perdem uma. Para eles não existe um temafavorito. Comentam a rodada do futebol com a mesma habilidade que discutem o final da novela. E não param por aí. Falam de trabalho,publicam posts de humor e se metem até no tema mais odiado das redes sociais, política. Formam o grupo que tem mais acesso as redes,normalmente chamados de heavy users. Até por isso é um grupo bem distribuído, formado por homens e mulheres de todas as idades, classessociais e regiões do país.Características comuns do grupo:▪ Quem faz parte: Homens e Mulheres▪ Perfil demográfico: Todas as classes e idades
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 107▪ Frequência de acesso: ALTA▪ O que mais publica: De tudo um pouco▪ Assunto preferido: TODOS▪ Assunto odiado: NENHUM▪ O que faz quando gosta de um conteúdo: compartilha▪ O que faz quando não gosta de um conteúdo: ignoraEM 2º COM 27% - ‚OS DO CONTRA‛Basicamente não gostam de nada. Ou melhor, só gostam do que publicam e não perdem a oportunidade de falar mal sobre os posts alheios.Ainda assim são politizados é não odeiam tanto o tema política como outros grupos. Em sua composição possui gente de todas as classessociais, mas é o grupo que conta com maior participação de indivíduos de classe A. Eles usam as redes mais para ver do que para seremvistos. É o grupo que menos posta e tem frequência de acesso esporádica. Conta com a participação de homens, mas apresenta umaproporção maior entre mulheres. A idade varia, mas tem sua maioria entre pessoas de 31 a 50 anos e se destaca pela maior presença depessoas da região Nordeste. ‚Pense duas vezes antes de enviar um post polêmico para esse tipo de amigo virtual. Um post indesejado etchau. Eles deletam seus amigos virtuais com a mesma facilidade com que postam uma foto‛, acrescenta Davi.Características comuns do grupo:▪ Quem faz parte: Homens e Mulheres▪ Perfil demográfico: Classe A/B - 31 - 50 anos▪ Frequência de acesso: BAIXA▪ O que mais publica: Não publicam▪ Assunto preferido: TRABALHO▪ Assunto odiado: SEXO▪ O que faz quando gosta de um conteúdo: apenas vê▪ O que faz quando não gosta de um conteúdo: deleta o amigo que enviouEM 3º COM 22% - OS HOOLIGANSComo o nome sugere, esse grupo é formado majoritariamente por homens que adoram discutir sobre esportes, em especial sobre futebol. Temuma frequência de acesso moderada ainda assim são o grupo que mais postam quando acessam. Mas, ao contrário do que se poderiaimaginar, é raro um integrante deste grupo deletar um amigo de sua rede. ‚Para eles, as redes sociais são como mesa de bar ou papo debanheiro masculino. Falam de bola, humor e claro, sexo.‛ ” acrescenta Davi Bertoncello.Características comuns do grupo:▪ Quem faz parte: Homens▪ Perfil demográfico: Classe B/C - 16 - 30 anos▪ Frequência de acesso: MODERADO▪ O que mais publica: Coisas pessoais e posts de humor▪ Assunto preferido: ESPORTES / FUTEBOL▪ Assunto odiado: POLÍTICA▪ O que faz quando gosta de um conteúdo: DA LIKE
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 108▪ O que faz quando não gosta de um conteúdo: IGNORA4º COM 21% AS MARICOTASFormado basicamente por mulheres, seus temas favoritos são humor, autoajuda e novela. ‚Um verdadeiro clube da Luluzinha digital. Nãoperdem a oportunidade de comentar sobre aquele capítulo mais quente até porque conta com a presença de muitas donas de casa‛,acrescenta Stella Mattos, diretora de contas da Hello Research. É o grupo com menos escolaridade formado em sua maioria por mulheres daclasse C com idade entre 25 e 35 anos.Características comuns do grupo:▪ Quem faz parte: Mulheres▪ Perfil demográfico: Classe C▪ Frequência de acesso: MODERADA▪ O que mais publica: Correntes e fotos▪ Assunto preferido: AUTO-AJUDA▪ Assunto odiado: POLÍTICA▪ O que faz quando gosta de um conteúdo: COMENTA▪ O que faz quando não gosta de um conteúdo: comenta com Indignação‚O estudo ‚Papo Social‛ ainda conta com muitas outras informações essenciais para um maior entendimento do uso das redes sociais noBrasil, e foi interessante concluir que o agrupamento de pessoas se dá muito mais por afinidade de assuntos discutidos do quenecessariamente por questões demográficas, não sendo segredo pra ninguém que um sujeito com mil amigos virtuais não tem nem perto destemontante formado por amizades que se estendam ao mundo real. E, esses amigos a mais, inegavelmente, são compostos por pessoas que temalguma afinidade com o conteúdo postado pelo outro‛, destaca Davi Bertoncello, CEO da Hello Research, idealizadora do estudo.Facebook to Partner With Acxiom, Epsilon to Match Store PurchasesWith User ProfilesCan Facebook Ads Drive Offline Buying?By: Cotton Delo Published: February 22, 2013376share this pageUse a loyalty card for discounts at the drug store? The ads you see on Facebook could start looking familiar.Facebook is testing out a new kind of ad targeting that will let brands market to users based on what theyve bought in stores, according toexecs briefed on their plans.Facebook is partnering with data giants including Epsilon, Acxiom and Datalogix to allow brands to match data gathered through shopper loyaltyprogram to individual Facebook profiles, much like its done previously with marketers customer data from their CRM databases. Datalogix, acompany with a rich trove of loyalty-program data, gained notice last fall after Facebook partnered with the firm to decipher whether usersexposed to ads on the social network ended up buying any of those products in stores.RELATED STORIESFacebook Deal to Buy Microsofts Atlas Coming As Soon As Next WeekSocial Network Is Building An Ad Stack to Rival GoogleCan Facebook Crack the CPG Market?With CPG Summit, Social Network Seeks to Prove It Speaks the Language
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 109The targeting would hypothetically enable Coca-Cola to target to teenagers whove bought soda in the last month, or Pampers to show ads toNorth Carolina residents whove recently bought baby products, since Facebooks own array of demographic and interest-based targetingoptions can be added to further refine audience segments. But adoption will be contingent on acceptance by corporate legal departments waryof becoming embroiled in a consumer privacy scare.The targeting will function through anonymized matching of loyalty-program members and Facebook users through email addresses and phonenumbers, according to sources with knowledge of the product. (Holders of loyalty cards from retailers are asked for their email or phonenumber when they register, and Facebook users sign into the site using one or the other, and a match between two corresponding data pointsneeds to be detected to enable delivery of an ad.)The product seems aimed at CPG marketers, whom Facebook has been assiduously courting of late, hosting its first CPG Summit in New Yorklast month. That event put a spotlight on "custom audiences," which lets brands upload emails, phone numbers and addresses from their CRMdatabases to show ads to their existing customers on Facebook. The ad targeting powered by shopper data uses the same technology, called"hashing," to find a match without allowing Facebook data to be intelligible to data vendors, or vice versa.OMD is part of the ongoing beta test, and its social media director Colin Sutton said hes enthusiastic about the measurement potential implicitin being able to connect the dots between Facebook ads and offline sales, as well as the specificity of the targeting."Our CPG clients can begin to micro-target specific sets of consumers based on their in-store activity and buying behaviors and customize themessaging," he said.The notion of targeting people online based on their offline purchase history isnt new, and Datalogix partners with any number of ad-techcompanies, including AppNexus, Invite Media and MediaMath. A key distinction is that until now, its just been possible to buy an aggregatepopulation of cookies, and it can be difficult to discern how many unique users out of the pool have seen the ad or whether 20% of them havebeen targeted several times, according to Tousanna Durgan, MECs senior director for audience buying."Because of the recency and accuracy of Facebook, the likelihood of seeing the whole population throughout your campaign is greater," shesaid.Though purchase-based targeting will be enticing to brands, adoption will hinge on Facebook demonstrating that its crossed every "t" anddotted every "i" with respect to protecting consumer privacy. MECs social lead Kristine Segrist noted that adoption of "custom audiences" --or targeting using data from CRM databases -- has been slow, since approval often needs to be obtained from beyond the marketing functionat brands."Facebooks challenge is going to be breaking down the process in ways that are simple to understand and fostering confidence that thispowerful data can be handled in a responsible way," she said.Epsilon referred a call to Facebook, which declined comment on the new tool. Acxiom and Datalogix didnt immediately respond to requests forcomment.Mobile em 2013Postado por @mobilizadoblog em fev 21, 2013Por Terence ReisPrevisões. É o que provavelmente vem como tema à mente de todos tentando escrever um artigo neste momento. Previsões para 2013? Eu sóvou fazer uma ” os smartphones vão ser retângulos de plástico cada vez maiores.Caso queiram mais previsões, é só fazer a busca por ‚2013 predictions for mobile and digital‛, não vai faltar material. No entanto, podemos,observando o mercado, apostar nos principais temas deste próximo ano.Uma aposta já podemos deixar de lado: qual vai ser o ano do ‚mobile‛. Se um ano foi representativo deste, este ano foi 2012. 10 anos depoisda primeira aposta, para 2002, mas chegamos lá.Eu sempre disse que este ano não seria medido em dinheiro, mas em mind share. E, de fato, não há como escapar que a necessidade de umapresença mobile bem-estruturada é um consenso e ‚mobile first‛ virou clichê.Mas aos temas de 2013 para mobile:#mobile commerce#smartphone como hub#interatividade com o mundo físico
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 110#mobile extended#personal ecosystem#analytics#Mobile CommerceEm 2012 o volume de compras feito por meio de smartphones e/ou tablets dobrou no Brasil, atingindo 10% das vendas online no país, deacordo com pesquisa da Câmara e-net. Mas mobile commerce não é apenas compras online por meio de apps ou sites em tablets esmartphones.O uso do mobile para compras tem a ver com a descoberta, a busca, a comparação, e, claro, a conversão. O uso mais evidente,no momento, cujo impacto é difícil de ser mensurado mas se estende além das vendas online para o mundo físico, é o showrooming.Showrooming é a prática de se pesquisar na loja com um smartphone na mão, para comparação de preços, pesquisa de produtos similares ebusca nos concorrentes. O consumidor está na loja e ao mesmo tempo em todas as demais lojas ” online ou não ” buscando a melhor opção.Varejistas precisam estar estruturados para esta prática, facilitando a busca e comparação de preços. É o caso do app da Amazon, que temcomo recurso em destaque o código de barras para análise de preços.E não se trata apenas da busca no app. É preciso estar preparado para os mecanismos de busca, para o acesso direto ao mobile site e adescoberta do produto. Quanto mais você se tornar um facilitador deste processo de showrooming, maiores as suas chances de conquistar afidelidade deste consumidor.E o ‚bed commerce‛? Os consumidores vêm descobrindo que para a maioria dos produtos, uma tela de 20″ (ou mesmo 13″) é desnecessária.Ele pode, no conforto de seu sofá ou cama, pegar seu smartphone e tablet, e fazer a compra ” muitas vezes por impulso, por ser tão fácil.Então não custa enfatizar: em 2013 quem ainda confiar em seu site feito para a web no PC estará em grande desvantagem diante destasnovas formas e recursos à disposição dos consumidores para suas compras.#O smartphone como hubNeste mesmo tema podemos encaixar a interatividade com o mundo físico e o que vamos chamar de ‚mobile extended‛. O que significa isto?Em termos práticos, a tela fica cada vez menos importante, e as funções exercidas pelos smartphones se tornam cada vez mais relevantes. Háuma tendência que eu venho repetindo nos últimos 2 anos, vai em inglês: ‚mobile is dead‛.Isto era apenas isca para a atenção das pessoas, claro. O que estava sendo dito é que mobile deixará de ser apenas smartphones e tablets. Apartir do momento em que tudo recebe uma conexão, um processador e um sensor, passamos a ter um mundo bastante diferente. Einteressante.TVs, torradeiras, termostatos, geladeiras, carros, portas ” em breve todos estes se tornarão parte de mobile. Que, em vista da abrangênciamassiva, deixa de ser um subset do digital e se torna cada vez mais o próprio digital.Neste novo mundo os smartphones irão aumentar a sua importância ainda mais ” se tornando o hub, o ponto de encontro e controle de todosestes dispositivos. Nossa identidade, em breve, estará totalmente contida neste PID ” personal identification device.#Personal ecosystemEste é o ponto onde a sua atividade se encontra com o ‚mobile extended‛.Mobile torna cada vez mais a web uma questão pessoal. A minha web é diferente da sua, posto que adaptada às minhas necessidades einteresses. E esta ‚web‛ é composta pelos meus aplicativos, meu ecossistema pessoal, onde tenho acesso aos meus conteúdos (fotos,tweets, posts), amigos, eventos, atividades e controlo tudo o que faço. Do mais extremo ‚eu quantificado‛, registrando as práticas esportivas,os batimentos cardíacos, ao mainstream do calendário, fotos e listas.Se você está fora deste ecossistema pessoal você está fora do campo de escolhas do consumidor. Nesta nova web não há mais ‚oconcorrente está há um clique‛. Nesta nova web o concorrente pode simplesmente deixá-lo de fora. O personal ecosystem é, no fim, umpersonal walled garden.A melhor forma de se fazer parte deste mundo será por meio das ‚mobile wallets‛ ” das mais completas como o Google Wallet a iniciativascomo o Passbook da Apple, as ‚wallets‛ irão agregar o que realmente interessa ao consumidor, e este irá recorrer a estas sempre quenecessário, pois representam grande simplificação do processo atual de compra e uso de cupons e tickets.#Analytics
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 111Quais são os números que importam? Estamos deixando o mundo da competição por downloads e entendendo que o fundamental é se manterpresente no device das pessoas.Neste sentido, os apps de m-commerce, hoje, estão em uma categoria complexa, os ‚one and dones‛. São apps que são usados com muitopouca frequência e têm baixa retenção.Como reverter este cenário? Como usar o recurso de push notifications para trazer o usuário para o app sem gerar desconforto? Como gerarvalor que justifique a presença continuada no device?Resumindo tudo o que foi escrito, acho que podemos fazer mais uma previsão para 2013. 2013 será, sobretudo, um ano de desafios para asmarcas que queiram estar presentes da melhor forma no universo mobile. É um novo mundo a ser navegado e há vários caminhos. É precisoatenção, mas, por outro lado, se há um momento onde ainda é possível se escolher o caminho errado ” pois há tempo para retornar, este éagora.Brasil: País das redes sociais no celularPostado por @mobilizadoblog em mar 1, 2013Categorias: Destaque, Gráficos, Mercado, Pesquisa.Esta semana a Nielsen liberou uma pesquisa sobre o mercado mobile, divulgada peloMeio&Mensagem, que aponta que 75% dos brasileirosusam seus celulares para acessarem redes sociais ” a taxa mais alta entre dez países pesquisados. O Brasil também se destaca no uso deaplicativos de jogos (68%), de serviços de geolocalização (56%), e na audiência de vídeos ou TV no celular (43%), ocupando a segundaposição nos três quesitos e perdendo, especificamente, para China (70%), Coreia do Sul (59%) e, novamente, Coreia do Sul (44%).A pesquisa The Mobile Consumer: A Global Snapshot pesquisou hábitos de consumo e comportamento relacionados ao uso de celular naAustrália, Estados Unidos, Índia, Itália, Rússia, Reino Unido e Turquia, além dos já citados Brasil, China e Coreia do Sul. Os dados foramreunidos por entidades oficiais do setor por meio de pesquisa online ou questionário ao vivo, no decorrer de 2012.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 112Outros dados interessantes sobre os brasileiros mostram que 21% da população usa o chamado ‚multimedia phone‛, celulares com tecladoqwerty e/ou touchscreen, sem sistema operacional avançado ” a taxa mais alta entre os pesquisados. O país com maior índice desmartphones é a Coreia do Sul (67%) e de ‚feature phone‛ (celulares sem qwerty, touchscreen ou sistema operacional avançado) é a Índia(80%).A resistência dos celulares com teclado qwerty no Brasil ” uma exceção entre os países pesquisados ” é reflexo do alto uso de redes sociaise também de instant messaging: 57% dos entrevistados usam o serviço de texto via internet, atrás somente de coreanos (70%) e chineses(67%). Brasileiros ainda ocupam a terceira posição na taxa de uso de aplicativos de notícias (45%), atrás, novamente, de China (55%) e Coreiado Sul (54%).Plano de dadosApesar da alta adesão aos dispositivos móveis, somente 43% dos brasileiros compram pacotes de dados ” é a menor taxa dos paísespesquisados, ao lado da Rússia. Um dos motivos é o alto preço dos planos brasileiros, que se reflete também no grande número de brasileirosque, na busca pela operadora mais conveniente, possui mais de um aparelho: 48%, atrás somente da Rússia (51%).A pesquisa também analisa o comportamento relacionado a veiculação de anúncio em celulares: 38% dos brasileiros dizem receber anúnciosvia mensagem de texto/SMS, a taxa mais alta entre os pesquisados. Metade dos brasileiros não se incomodam com anúncios em celulares,desde que possam acessar conteúdo gratuitamente. A mesma taxa de russos e americanos disseram não se importar, ficando atrás somentedos indianos, com 54%.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 113Latin America‘s Media Landscape 2015-2017BY BRUNO ALMEIDA@US MEDIA CONSULTING ON NOVEMBER 18, 2012 IN LATIN AMERICA, MEDIA, MOBILE, ONLINE, PRINT, TVThis post is also available in: SpanishPredicting the future is always tricky, but different industry associations have made forecasts for different forms of media in Latin America forthenext few years, all based on current trends. Using this data, here’s what experts say that Latin America’s media market will look like in thenear future.#1 THERE WILL BE 359 MILLION INTERNET USERS IN LATIN AMERICA BY 2015Currently the population of Latin America is at around 575 million but according to the Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe(CEPAL), by 2015 Latin America will have 598 million people. (This count includes Puerto Rico, projected to have 4.1 million people by 2015, butexcludes non-Spanish-speaking countries like Haiti and French Guyana.)
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 114According to a May 2012 projection from Registro de Direcciones de Internet para América Latina y Caribe (LACNIC), by 2015 Internetpenetration will reach 60% in Latin America. Since 60% of 598 million is 359 million, it appears that Latin America will add 127 million Internetusers over the next 3 years to its current total of 232 million Internet users.Not surprisingly, the growth will be driven by the powerhouse Internet markets.Brazil’s Comitê Gestor da Internet estimates that 80% ofBrazil’s homes will have Internet access by 2015. Given Brazil’s population of 193 million and an average of 3.3 people per household, thismeans that by 2015 Brazil could have 154 million Internet users„up considerably from the 85 million it has today per comScore. LACNIC alsopredicts that Mexico will have 65 million Internet users by 2015, up hugely from its current total of 40.6 million. Other markets predicted togain lots of new users include Chile (16.4 million Internet users by 2015) and Ecuador (7.5 million Internet users by 2015).#2 PAY TV PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA WILL REACH 68% BY 2017According to Dataxis, by 2017 pay TV penetration in the 7 biggest Latin American markets will reach 68% and offer advertisers and audienceof 97 million people. The biggest growth markets for pay TV will be Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Argentina. In addition, the head of Brazil’snational telecommunications agency (Anatel) recently said that 90% of Brazilian homes could have pay TV by 2018. For its part, Mexico couldhave more than 50% of pay TV penetration by 2015.#3 LATIN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS WILL GROW BY 5.5% PER YEAR THROUGH 2016The downturn experienced by newspapers around the world does not seem to be affecting Latin America. According to a recent projectionfrom PricewaterhouseCoopers, revenues for Latin American newspapers will grow annually by 5.5% through 2016 to reach US$10.4 billion.#4 LATAM WILL HAVE 750 MOBILE CONNECTIONS BY 2015 PLUS MAJOR MOBILE DEVICE PENETRATIONAccording to the GSMA, Latin America will have 750 million mobile connections by 2015. Overall mobile penetration in the region is above100%. Brazil’s mobile penetration is at well over 100%, as is Argentina’s, but in October 2012 Brazil reached a total of 258 million active mobilelines, up from 232 million just a few months back. Mexico is slated to reach 94% mobile penetration by the end of 2012 and over 100% by thefirst quarter of 2013.Beyond simple penetration, mobile is changing Latin American markets through the adoption of mobile devices. It’s really not a question ofwhether a brand needs a mobile ad strategy for Latin America„it’s what this mobile ad strategy will be. Just look at the numbers:“ By 2015 Latin America will have 370 million mobile broadband subscribers“ Brazil will have 157 million mobile connections by 2015„more than double the 73 million it should reach in 2012“ Smartphone penetration in Mexico will reach 70% by 2015“ By 2015 some 200 million tablets will be sold in Peru“ IDC projects that by 2015, 57% of the mobile phones sold in Brazil will be smartphones“ Tablet sales in Brasil went up 267% from January to August 2012 and 5.4 million will be sold in Brazil in 2013Facebook Will Launch Content-Specific News Feeds, Bigger Photos AndAds On ThursdayJOSH CONSTINEAt a big press event on Thursday, Facebook plans to launch new ways to filter the news feed. These include a Photos feed of Facebook andInstagram photos, as well as a revamped Music feed of what friends are listening to, concerts, and new albums, according to multiple sourcesboth within and close to Facebook. Larger images and image-based ads in the web and mobile feeds are coming too.Why is Facebook adding new streams? Because we are information junkies. Give us a feed and we’ll read it. But when we scroll so far we hitre-runs ” we hit the road. So Facebook has a plan to give us something different to look at starting March 7th. If the ‚new look‛ for the newsfeed that it’s unveiling works, it could get us spending more hours on Facebook and seeing more „ and more intense „ ads.Facebook has neglected the news feed, which has functioned largely the same since it launched on the web in 2006, and on iPhone in 2009. Acolumn of friends’ faces on the left, their status updates to the right, and a whole lot of white space. Content-specific feeds have been hard toaccess, and the ‚Top News‛ or ‚Most Recent‛ sorting options mostly re-shuffle content rather than surfacing different stories.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 115Speaking on the condition of anonymity, a Facebook employee, a member of the social ads industry, and several developers concurred thatmultiple feeds and larger images in posts by users, Pages, and ads are what’s in store for Thursday.As for what’s not confirmed for this week is the employee-only test build of a radically redesigned mobile feed in a native iOS app that Iwitnessed a few months ago. One source said that they didn’t think this major mobile redesign is ready yet, contrary to my initial speculationwhen the launch event was announced. All in due time with that one. If it does launch this week, it could be a standalone app like Camera, or anoption in the primary apps.Before I get to the details about what my sources say is launching, let’s look at some supporting evidence and reasons why these are the rightmoves for Facebook. If you want the abbreviated version, skip to ‚So What’s Launching?‛EVIDENCE OF WHAT’S COOKINGBURIED FEEDSOver the last year, Facebook has been piling up some dedicated, content-specific feeds. But they’re tough to find. Just after its September2011 developer conference, the company debuted a Music feed, which it’s been slowly adding more content to. At first it was just what friendswere listening to in apps like Spotify, but now it includes updates from musician Pages, upcoming albums and nearby concerts, as well assuggestions of music you might like. Few users know about it, though, as access is hidden deep in the Apps section of the sidebar.Considering how popular link discovery sites like Reddit have become, it’s strange that Facebook doesn’t highlight its links feed anymore. Thetough-to-find link lets you see all the websites friends have shared.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 116In October 2012, Facebook added a Pages-only feed that only shows updates from Pages you Like. There’s also the recently tested ‚MyOffers‛feed and even a forgotten Notes feed.What all these separate feeds have in common is that they’re buried in the sidebar navigation menu and scattered across categories likeFavorites, Pages, and Apps. If Faebook surfaced at least some of them in a more prominent, cohesive way, we’d be a lot more likely to switchto them when we finish reading the main feed.FEEDS THAT DON’T EXIST BUT SHOULDWhen I talked to product manager Josh Williams ahead of the launch of Facebook’s new location-discovery service Nearby, and to CTO CoryOndrejka at a Facebook reporters event, both said there were interesting things to be done with content-specific feeds. For example, storiesshared from third-party Open Graph apps like Instagram, RunKeeper, Foursquare, and Foodspotting could benefit from their own feed designedto show what friends are up to off Facebook and help you find new apps to download.When Facebook launched the Music feed the day after f8, I suspected ‚news‛ and video feeds to launch, but they never did. The lack of a‚news‛ news feed was odd considering Facebook wants to compete with Twitter as a place where people discover…news. The lack of a videofeed of what friends had been watching was actually the result of a legal ban. But in December the U.S. government eased restrictions from theVideo Privacy Protection Act, paving the way for a feed of Netflix and Hulu activity.Most surprisingly, there’s no feed of just photos, though there used to be. Now the Photos sidebar bookmark just leads to your own imagesand albums, which isn’t very helpful. A photo-only feed viewed full-screen or at a much wider width could be a hit. It’s been very successful forInstagram, and Facebook has been doing its best to take cues from its fresh and beloved acquisition.ZUCK SAID THE FEED WILL GET A RICHER DESIGNCEO Mark Zuckerberg himself said the news feed needs to evolve to be more vivid. Smartphones and fast connections make it much easier toshare media than when the feed first launched. As Business Insider mentioned last week, Zuckerberg said on the Q4 earnings call that:‚As our news feed design evolves to show richer kinds of stories, that opens up new opportunities to offer different kinds of ads as well…Oneof the product design principles that we’ve always had is we want the organic content to be of the same basic types of formats as paidcontent, right? So, historically, advertisers want really rich things like big pictures or videos and we haven’t provided those things historically.But, one of the things that we’ve done in the last year is you’ve seen the organic news feed product that consumers use moving towardsbigger pictures, richer media and I think you’ll continue to see it go in that direction. And, I think that a lot of the success of products likeInstagram is because of that. It’s a very immersive ” even on a small screen, just ” it’s a wonderful photo product.‛The key word in Zuckerberg’s comment is ‚immersive.‛ Facebook’s web and mobile feeds are full of chrome. There are always-visiblenavigation bars on the top of both web and mobile, as well as sidebars galore on the web. Facebook tried to give the news feed a more real-time feel last year with Ticker, but a lot of people hate it, ignore it, or take advantage of Facebook’s kind option to minimize it.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 117By taking the navigation chrome, sidebars, and Ticker and trimming them down, hiding them while we browse, or cutting them entirely, Facebookcould free up a ton of space. It could use that to expand the width and height of the feed so it could show more stories and bigger images.This would keep us focused on the beautiful content shared by our friends, reduce exhaustion, and keep us scrolling.Google predicts seismic ad shiftNEW YORK: More than half of advertising could be online within five years, claims Googles chief business officer.Speaking at the D: Dive Into Media conference, Nikesh Arora observed that while the global advertising industry is worth around $800bn,online advertising accounts for less than $100bn of that figure."There is a reasonable probability that over 50% of advertising goes online in the next five years," he said."The big tipping point were waiting for is internet-connected televisions," he added. "Were waiting for things going from nice-to-have tomust-have."Elsewhere, a new report suggests Google could generate $5bn in revenue this year via the sale of advertisements on its search engine ontablets.The company has already increased the prices that advertisers pay for ads on mobile-devices, bringing them up to the level of ads on PCssaying that "the lines between devices are quickly blurring" while ad performance is similar.Marin Software, however, expects conversion rates from searches on tablets to exceed those on PC during the course of this year and saysthat advertisers are already spending more of their ad budgets on tablets than on smartphones."Either tablets have overperformed or smartphones have underperformed," observed Matt Lawson, Marins chief marketing officer.By the end of 2013, tablets are forecast to account for 20% of mouse clicks on Googles search ads in the US, as more people use them toresearch and shop online.Google generated about $40bn in total ad revenue in 2012.Data sourced from AllThingsD/Wall Street Journal; additional content by Warc staff, 14 February 2013Selling Digital Ads Is Easy, But Thats Actually a Big ProblemThe supply of eligible sales executives is growing, the need for people is decreasing, and the product being sold is getting commoditized.By: Randy Kilgore Published: February 12, 2013Digital media sales is a great business to be in at the moment. Interactive advertising revenue in the U.S. regularly goes up by double digitsyear over year. Advertising is the standard means of monetizing digital content, and all content is becoming digital. Its easy to make moneyselling digital advertising„but thats actually a really big problem.Easy money provides little incentive for self-improvement. When every check comes in, and youre fat and happy, its natural to think: why workharder? Sales managers face a similar inertia. Theyre under pressure to hit their monthly and quarterly goals. Taking time to pull the team offthe street to undergo training means less time selling. In these cases the major driver is immediate success, and its risking our shared long-term prosperity.Already we are losing ground. The 2012 Interactive Advertising Bureau Interactive Ad IQ Survey demonstrated that industry professionalsarent comfortable articulating the value of digital media platforms. Eighty percent of respondents said understanding the value of online videowas important, but nearly 20% werent comfortable articulating its value in an overall media mix. For search, a classic, 35% of respondentsexpressed a lack of comfort. If we dont pause for regular training, we wont be able to articulate the value of our ever-evolving and advancingmedia to marketers; and if we cant communicate value, we can only sell on price.I know how it goes, Ive heard it first-hand. Its easy to say, "We can get this deal if we lower our price." But its a race to the bottom. If wekeep traveling down this road, someday digital media will be fully commoditized, and sales wont be a great business to be in anymore.Training would also help quell threats that are coming from other directions. Programmatic buying, for example, is the number one way agenciesgain efficiencies. But this strategy of fewer people, more machines, has a causal effect on the number of sellers needed over time. The morehelpful a seller can be to the marketer, the less advantage buyers get from using a machine. Furthermore, every year more people are enteringthe sales force with digital knowledge. In 2003, someone could have had six years of experience in the field at the most. Today many morepeople are qualified to be digital sellers. We need to train them to ensure they have viable, long-term careers.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 118In video specifically, where I spend my time, sales executives must be able to nurture a feeling of comfort in brand marketers who areaccustomed to TV. The development of the viewable impression and digital GRPs is one way this is happening. But really, GRPs are just thecomfort food that gets you into the restaurant. Theres a lot more precision than 18 to 49 in the digital world. Having a sales staff who canconfidently explain what a viewable impression is, the users experience of a video ad, and the marketers benefit of reaching more particulargroups of people with well-tailored big ideas is vital to attracting more marketers to interactive media. Its about being able to proficientlydiscuss big data and big ideas„the theme of the IABs upcoming Annual Leadership Meeting.The supply of eligible sales executives is growing, the need for people is decreasing, and the product being sold is getting commoditized. Sowhat do we do? We slow down and take a good look at how to improve the immense value that s inherent in always-on, targetable, andinteractive marketing. That, for example, is whats happening with the development of the viewable impression. Dozens of industry leadersfrom across the ecosystem have come together to thoughtfully and meticulously change the way everyday business is done for the industryslong-term health.For sellers, as you can probably guess, it requires education. The first casualty of running fast and making easy money is not having a firmgrasp on the basics. Sales professionals must know things like how an ad server works and what "views" are if they are to describe the actualvalue that digital media brings to brands. They must not only be educated in their individual business, but also the business theyre all in. TheIAB Digital Media Sales Certification and the IAB members-only Online Sales Media Kit are two good tools. Getting the certification and puttingin your email signatures will let marketers know theyre dealing with someone who has invested time in learning how to meet their needs.Taking advantage of the existence of a beautifully crafted media kit that tells the story of how digital media collectively, across platforms andindividually by platform, answer all of the human needs described by Abraham Maslow, is another way to build and polish sales skills andpresentations. Digital media provide opportunities to marketers because they are fundamental to human beings, people, users, consumersneeds to connect with others, be enlightened, be informed, feel secure, etc. The new IAB online sales media kit affords all salespeople a placeto construct customized presentations that tell a human narrative and use credible and well positioned data and research to support assertionsabout digital media value.But these arent panaceas. Company leadership must believe in professional development. The mandate for training must come from the top.Thats the only way it wont get overshadowed by complacency and quarterly goals. That can even play out by having a full-time sales trainer onstaff„the portals all do.Whats on the line isnt just job security for sales executives, its the security of the future of our industry. The ability to make marketers morecomfortable with digital advertising is essential for growing digital medias share of the revenue.Encouraging this kind of tectonic advancement one sales call at a time takes expertise, expertise too few sales executives have at this time.Weve been in a hurry to grow this business, but now we need to slow down and take a good look at how to financially bring to fruition thelasting, brand value thats inherent in it. While the money is good right now, theres no reason to think it will always be that way. Its going totake work.10 Due Diligence Tests: Ensuring you get the Right JobColin ShawFebruary 13, 2013Far too many people think a recruitment process is one way; it’s all about the organization discovering if you are the right person for them. Tome this is only half the story. It is equally as important to find out if the organization is right for you by undertaking ‘due diligence’. Much ofwhat I will say below refers to my area of specialism, Customer Experience, but the same principles apply to other roles.So let me set the scene. Let’s assume I have applied for the role of Head of Customer Experience. Here is what I would ask/do and the reasonwhy:1. What is my role and responsibility?“ Do I think these responsibilities are reasonable? What levels do I have in place to achieve these?2. What does this mean I can and can’t do?“ What I can’t do is potentially more important than the can do. Many times people are given responsibility without authority. That is arecipe for disaster. Don’t just take their first reply, test them. For example; ask them if you can stop a product being launched as it will providea poor Customer Experience? The answer will be revealing.3. What is the vision/mission of the organization and please show me how this is being delivered.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 119“ I am trying to see here if the vision/mission is ‘real’ or just a piece of paper. I am also looking at how good they are at implementingstrategy. If the vision/mission is just a piece of paper, why is this the case and what do they really do?4. How do you define a ‘Customer Experience’ ?“ I am trying to discover if they know what they are talking about! Does the organization know what this will take to do? If they don’t,make sure you tell them what you think will need to change. If they don’t think you will be able to do this, don’t take the job. You are settingyourself up for failure.5. What does the senior team think is a Customer Experience and how committed are they?“ Ideally I would ask to talk with a couple of senior managers and quiz them on how committed they are.6. What is the reason the organization is trying to improve the Customer Experience?“ I am trying to discover the motivation behind this action and establish if they arereally committed to making the necessary changesto improve the Customer Experience.7. How customer-centric is the organization today?“ I am trying to understand whether they realise customer centricity and improving the Customer Experience go hand in hand.8. Can I spend a day at the office?“ I would ask to spend a day at the office, to get a sense of the culture for the organization by talking with people. I don’t believepeople do this enough. This is also a great way of finding out what they think of you. If they thought I was a good fit for the job then theywould welcome this. If they didn’t they wouldn’t go to the bother of doing this. I would go so far as to say if they didn’t want me to do this butstill offered me the job, I would refuse the position.“ I think by asking this it shows commitment from me and also from them. During this day, I would wander around and talk with people,asking what it’s like to work there and whether they think senior managers are committed to the Customer Experience.9. I would find some of their Customers via social media and talk with them.“ How good/bad is it? Do they think the company is committed?10. I would find ex-employees that used to work for the company, via LinkedIn and get their views.“ By selecting people that have left you may get a more honest view of what it would be like working there.This is my due diligence. But what is the organization looking for? What attributes make a great Customer Experience professional? Am I evenapplying for the right job? Following a post on LinkedIn a few weeks ago, I stated a key attribute of a Customer Experience professional is ahigh level of emotional intelligence, but what else? I ‘crowd sourced’ the attributes listed below.The really interesting point for me is that a number of these are attitudinal, but I wonder how many companies are recruiting based on these.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 120So when it comes to recruitment remember that it’s a two way street. It’s not just about the organization it’s also about you. Ask challengingquestions. If they have any sense they will welcome it. If they haven’t, they are probably not the right organization for you in the first place!My thanks to the following people who contributed the attributes above:Tim Harpe, Karen Ball, David Physick, Monica Avby-Strahm, Wisdom Yao Nugba, David Kellett, Eva Maria Armborst, Tim Belon, Scott Faranello,Isabelle Roughol.What other ‘due diligence’ actions would you take?To read further blogs on Customer Experience written by the experts at Beyond Philosophy, please click hereBrazil Now Among the Top 10 Online Video Markets in the WorldBY LUCIANO RODRIGUES@USMEDIACONSULTING.COM ON FEBRUARY 15, 2013 INBRAZILAccording to comScore, in December 2012 Brazil become one of the top 10 markets in the world in terms of online video viewers. With 42.9million unique visitors to online video sites, Brazil is now ahead of France, the United Kingdom and Italy. In terms of penetration, online videoreaches 82.2% of Brazil’s Internet audience, which is very close to online video’s global reach (83.8% of Internet users).The most popular destination for this huge online video audience in Brazil is Google sites, which mostly means YouTube. However, while GoogleSites had 38.9 million unique viewers in December 2012, this is actually 7% less than in December 2011. VEVO is the number two site for onlinevideos in Brazil but it also lost audience between December 2011 and December 2012, dropping by 2%. In contrast, Facebook shot up by 408%during the same period, as did Globo (86%). In fact, with 17.5 million unique viewers in December 2012, Facebook is closing in on VEVO (17.6million unique viewers in that same month). Other online video sites with impressive gains in Brazil between December 2011 and December 2012include Yahoo (318%), R7 Portal (172%), Terra (136%) and UOL (34%).Recently, IBOPE highlighted a number of trends in Brazilian online video viewing that advertising, media and marketing professionals may findinteresting:“ In September 2012, nearly 38 million Brazilians watched content on sites from official distributors of TV shows and films„as opposedto YouTube, which consists of content shared by users“ Film sites attracted a significant portion of 18-24 year-olds, mostly men“ Streaming media sites reached 19.8 million unique users in Brazil in September 2012, an increase of 20% compared to September 2011“ The audience visiting streaming media sites in Brazil prefers videos about sports, soap operas or elections, and the largest group ofviewers is men aged 25-54 and women aged 25-34“ The number of children aged 2 to 17 watching online videos in Brazil went up by 46% between September 2011 and September 2012,while the increase was 62% for children under 11Big Data Wont Fix Bad PlanningAndrea Fishman | February 20, 2013Jumping on the "big data" bandwagon without a plan and roadmap is one of the worst investments a CMO may make in the next 18 months. Itsclear that to thrive in the digital economy, enterprises must take advantage of their data to spot new trends, act on current problems, and stayrelevant. Creating the data is, in many ways, the easy part. According to IBM, 90 percent of the worlds data has been created in the past twoyears. But understanding what to do with it, and how to act on it, is what is getting many marketers into trouble.Before making new investments of either time or money in big data solutions, organizations need to ensure they are fully optimizing theircurrent efforts and have a realistic roadmap for how and why a big data solution will help better decision-making.Start by getting your foundational elements in place:
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 121Clean current data. Ensure that all current data sources are clean, trusted, and flexible. While you are working on the future state, make yourcurrent inputs as trustworthy and valid as possible. This will not only improve your short-term analysis, but will remove some hurdles when youget closer toward the implementation of a new solution.Ensure alignment across vendors. Establish a roadmap that ties goals across vendors, ensuring that success is no longer something channel- orcampaign-specific. Get all your vendors on the same page about where you are heading and challenge them to deliver recommendations on howthey can improve performance with better insight.Assess emerging trends. Have a clear understanding of how changes in mobile usage, geography, and product line extensions will impact yourmeasurement goals. Look beyond whats working today to where you want to drive future behaviors and identify the elements needed to takeyou there.Develop phased roadmap. What are you trying to solve for in the next six to 12 months, and what are your 18-month and beyond-reach goals?Keep in mind that once you start down the big data path, you will have a runway of time before you have enough actionable data to startmaking decisions. Ensure there are midterm milestones that can help ensure you are on the right path.With the foundations in place, consider the pillars of big data and how they will be collected, managed, and interpreted:Diversity. What is the universe of data you would like to collect? Are you able to collect the data internally or through your partners? Will thedata be available at intervals necessary to make action, or will it be too lagging to provide value?Correlation. What are the connection points between the sources of data? What are you trying to solve for? Is it realistic that a set of data, nomatter how current, would provide the connections to solve for the need? Do you have the people in place to interpret the data and, moreimportantly, turn the data points into actionable recommendations?Quality. What is the degree of quality you can expect from your data? How much of it is self-reported, obtained from new vendors, or subjectto interpretation? Are you confident enough in your sources (often external vendors) that you are willing to make investment decisions basedon their data points?Organizational readiness. Is there an infrastructure in place that will enable centralized decision-making about what to include, how to measureit, and more importantly, how to action on it? In decentralized organizations, where each channel and team may be used to collect and assesstheir individual performance, this group-level analysis may have a disruptive influence.With a clear vision and detailed roadmap, big data may help you make the leap above your competition and toward higher performance. Withoutthat plan, big data just becomes more expensive data.Solving the Analytical Problem of Marketing AttributionNeil Mason | January 24, 2013Marketing attribution is a topic that remains a thorn in the side of most organizations. Are we still no better off than John Wanamaker back inthe 1800s when he purportedly said those famous words: "Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I dont know whichhalf"? The trouble is that the goal posts keep moving, and just when you think you might be able to get your arms around the subject, thelandscape changes.Marketing attribution is both a business problem and an analytical problem. The business problem is simple: "How do I best spend my budget?"The analytical problem is a bit more complex: "How do I develop a methodology that delivers some valuable insight to solve the businessproblem with the data, time, and budget available?" Historically the answer to that question has been to use whatever methodology thetechnology we are using can give us, and thats generally been the "last-click" attribution model. In a recentsurvey conducted by Econsultancy inassociation with Adobe, only around a quarter of client-side respondents claimed to be doing any form of marketing attribution analysis thatwasnt "last-click." So lots of companies potentially need to solve this analytical problem.To address analytical problems Im quite a big fan of the CRISP-DM process. Although originally designed specifically for data-mining projects, Ithink it encourages good discipline and business process around any analytical problem. I thought it would be interesting to apply it to themarketing attribution problem.The process is made up of six stages:“ Business understanding“ Data understanding
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 122“ Data preparation“ Modeling“ Evaluation“ DeploymentBusiness UnderstandingHere were trying to determine what the business problem is that were trying to solve for. In this case its generally a marketing mixoptimization problem. But what are the boundaries and what are the constraints? Are you only talking about digital channels here? If so, whichones? What about non-digital media such as TV, press, radio, etc.? Do they need to be included in the mix as well?Data UnderstandingDependent of the definition of the business problem, the next stage is to understand the data. Where is it and what does it look like? Howgood is the quality? Typically most companies will have web analytics and campaign-tracking systems at the core but there may be other dataavailable that will need to be integrated into the approach in some way. Based on what you find here it may be that you need to revisit thebusiness problem definition and adjust it accordingly.Data PreparationThis is generally the "heavy lifting" element of any project. Data need to be prepared for analysis and modeling and quite often you will findthat there is additional processing and data management that may be required. You may need to extract data from different systems and loadthem into another type of database. You may need to integrate different data sources together to get a comprehensive view of all thepotential marketing touch points. You may need to create new data collection methods to capture data that currently doesnt exist. Neverunderestimate the time and effort involved in this phase!ModelingOnce that heavy lifting has been done, its time to start modeling. Typically in the CRISP-DM view of the world this would be some kind ofstatistical modeling, but in our marketing attribution view of the world the models are generally not statistical in nature but generally differentviews of the data - e.g., first click, last click, linear attribution, and so on. Its likely that as the business problem becomes larger and morecomplex, more sophisticated analytical approaches are going to be required. Integrating offline marketing channels into the mix might mean, forexample, the need to use inferential modeling techniques such as regression analysis or econometrics. These techniques are generally notcheap, but if the marketing investments are large enough, then they should be able to generate some real ROI.EvaluationPart of the modeling process is evaluating the results. This is evaluating the model on two levels. Is it a good model from an analytical orstatistical perspective and is it a good model for the business - i.e., is it fit for purpose? Here you have to go back and look at the problemthat youre trying to solve and evaluate which model is the right one for you. Something that is too simplistic will provide you with a sub-optimalsolution to your problem. Something that is over-engineered will not give you the kind of ROI that youre looking for. Theres no point in havingsome complex econometric model if people only generally visit your website once before they decide to buy or not.DeploymentTheres no point in doing any of this stuff if the results arent deployed back into the organization! Its something that needs to be consideredupfront in the business understanding phase. How is the model going to be used? How will decisions be made? How often are you going toreview the methodology? Markets move, things change, so the models you use need to be regularly reviewed.Ive come to the conclusion over the years that there is no "right answer" to the marketing attribution question. Every organization is different -priorities are different, strategies are different, and so the business problem (while generally consistent) is often articulated and defineddifferently. Every marketing attribution model is likely to be a customized solution in some shape, form, or other. Hopefully this approach cangive you a framework for thinking about the problem.5 Content Marketing Trends for 2013 You Havent Heard YetMary Gail Pezzimenti | January 25, 2013OK, in 100 words or less…imagine Im talking really fast…
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 123Yes, social media marketing has arrived. It is here, being deployed more effectively and thoughtfully. There have been some great, user-friendlytools (e.g., Snip.it and Percolate) for authors and editors to use to curate great content - this makes our job easier and hello BuzzFeed. Theexplosive growth of consumer demand for smartphones and tablets has not yet caught up with marketing dollars making this bet on the future.What will be the tipping point? Integration (particularly e-commerce) at every turn with every platform is dizzying….This we have heard, read, and digested. All good to be mindful of, but the following are five content marketing trends that speak to thecontinual drive toward developing quality content on the independent web - our currency for successful content marketing.Youve heard that authors are becoming publishers and publishers are becoming brands. What does that really mean? Lets focus on trends thatexplore the gray matter between the two:1. Authors are forming strategic partnerships with each other. Bloggers are partnering with one another creatively more and more. Withmy editorial background, I must say this really excites me. Bloggers tend to be lone rangers - building their voice, audience, and sites on theirown. They join networks to help them grow their business, to take care of generating revenue, and to partner with brands in an authentic way.Sites like Go Mighty, IFB, or Chictopia are now seeing the power behind joining together around an idea, a common passion - creating yetanother brand. Many voices are coming together to form one.2. Brands are becoming thought leaders (really). Companies like American Express and GE have been at this content marketing game forquite some time now; five-plus years. Theyve been able to grow content development practices in-house and become thought leaders in topicsthat are of critical interest to their customers. Theyve managed to capture their customers attention in an organic way, through patience andperseverance. Their organizations are becoming smarter about how to use content effectively to add value beyond the promises of theirproduct or service. This represents progress and will continue to flourish.3. Editorial briefs are just as important as creative briefs. Editorial briefs are gaining in use and popularity, both in content marketingand social media marketing. Sure, its important for everyone to understand what the goals, tent poles, and KPIs there are, but its equallyimportant for everyone to be on the same page when it comes to the editorial strategy across platforms - the idea, voice, cadence, and themes- so that the authors have enough information to go back and create content that will resonate with their audience while serving the needs ofthe program/site/brands goals.4. No words necessary. Ideas are being visually expressed like never before. The wildly successful Tumblr, Pinterest, and Instagram areputting the power of a visual narrative in the hands of many. Those "authors" now are eye-forward stylists, artists, designers, photographers,and illustrators. Brands like Oreo have created a whole new visual quirkiness and humor through their Facebook wall photos. A DIY blogger,Handmade Charlotte, has a healthy blog audience but an obsessive following (900,000) on Pinterest with her DIY showcases.5. Traditional analytics may be overhauled. Measuring the success of content marketing programs has come down to rounding up thetypical stats: PVs, UVs, likes, impressions, shares, etc. Measuring the value of producing and sharing high-quality content for a brand has gotto ladder back to tangible results for the brand: expressions (via what your audience is saying/evangelizing), increasing brand awareness,attracting a new audience, an acquisition tool, moving product, or breaking down sales resistance. There are big bucks to be made here andthere will be new players on the scene to help us bridge the gap between all the good work were doing together and the need to showdemonstrable ROI.2013 image on home page via Shutterstock.4 Paths to Minimize Showrooming, Maximize SalesMelinda Krueger | January 23, 2013Retailers spend most of their budget and energy on the in-store experience. It only makes sense - upwards of 95 percent of revenue isgenerated inside the brick-and-mortar stores. However:“ The path to purchase often begins online. Seventy-three percent to eighty-three percent of U.S. consumers research online beforebuying in-store, according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers survey.“ Shoppers leave stores to buy online. Per a Harris Interactive poll, 43 percent of adults report that theyve visited a brick-and-mortarstore to examine a product before purchasing it elsewhere.“ Customer expectations of online/in-store integration out-pace the state of the industry. See the Forrester Research North AmericanTechnographics Retail Online Survey.“ Cross-channel satisfaction leads to revenue and loyalty. Per ForeSees 2012 E-Retail Satisfaction Index (U.S. Holiday Edition),satisfied site visitors are:
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 124o 65 percent more committed to the brand overallo 71 percent more likely to purchase from the retailer onlineo 58 percent more likely to purchase offlineo 69 percent more likely to recommend the retailero 67 percent more likely to purchase from the retailer next timeFurther complicating or enhancing the equation, depending on your perspective, is the influence of mobile. No one has summed up the impactbetter than Gibu Thomas, senior vice president of mobile and digital at Walmart, who was just named Mobile Retailer of the Year by MobileCommerce Daily."Almost every facet of our lives has been transformed by a smartphone, but when you walk into a store…your shopping experience is still verymuch what it was 10 or 20 years ago," said Thomas. ‚The possibility of mobile bringing the Web to the store is incredibly disruptive.Ecommerce brought the store to the Web and mobile brings the Web to the store. Our biggest opportunity in mobile is to drive offline-influenced retail sales with these capabilities, making it easier for our customers to shop with us," he said.Mobile sets the stage to integrate and create synergy among experiences on- and offline. As Vibes opines in its Mobile ConsumerSurvey, "Amajor factor driving consumers to research a product from their mobile phone while still in-store is simply to feel better about their purchase."Here are four ways to do just that.1. Put mobile tools in the hands of store associates. A mobile-enabled sales staff should be able to offer incentives, access purchasehistory and reward status, place online orders, and present in-depth product information and sales aids.2. Create the endless aisle. Customers want to be able to buy anywhere and return anywhere. Creating access to all store and onlineinventory will move more product. The in-store pick-up or return is an opportunity to win customer loyalty. Associates should be encouraged -and incented - to make all experiences positive.3. Enable self-serve. Let customers research - and buy - on their own, on their phones. Provide the information that moves them closerto purchase: product comparisons, ratings and reviews, and availability. Many consumers, particularly younger ones, do not want to talk to anassociate at the consideration stage. For those who move beyond and want to purchase, dont skimp on optimizing the checkout process.Conducting extensive usability, testing and tweaking e-commerce and m-commerce functionality doesnt win awards, but it does win sales andcustomers.4. Deliver effective digital messaging. Opportunities to gain competitive advantage abound here. Update your email templates to renderwell on mobile devices, which account for 30 to 50 percent of opens. Take advantage of push and SMS (not or, and!) to deliver sales andservice information:
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 125o Pickup notificationso Order statuso Delivery/installation/service statuso eReceiptso Account balanceso Returns received/processedo Offer codeso Couponso Traffic driverso Text-to-get and geo-targeted push for in-store offerso Sale, event, and product announcementso Credit card and reward program sign-upo Product information, reviews, and videoso Sweepstakes entryo Email opt-inAs Gibu Thomas noted, bringing the web to the store is incredibly disruptive. Make it disrupt your customer experience in the best possibleway.Programatic BuyingNEW YORK: The Kellogg Company, the food group, is now using automated buying tools for over half of its digital advertising, an approach thecompany believes has numerous benefits.Speaking at an event held by DigiDay, Bob Arnold, global digital strategy director for Kelloggs, argued automated, real-time digital adpurchases were a key area of focus for the organisation.More specifically, he suggested the "programmatic" buying of digital ads, which works in a similar way to stock market trading desks, need notbe limited to generic display formats."I want to show other marketers that programmatic can be used for brand marketers," Arnold said. ‚It is a direct response tool, and we aredriving a round peg in a square hole, but were still seeing tremendous results anyway."The majority of the firms paid-for digital ads are now traded via this route, and Kellogg works directly with demand-side providers (DSPs).Starcom, its agency, thus fulfils a different role."We want to be more hands on with whats going on behind the scenes," said Arnold. "Our motto is that agencies can help us on theconsultation side, and to find new partners, but we work directly with the DSPs."The first consideration Kelloggs was if programmatic buying would provide ads with the necessary level of "viewability" of ads on the page andreach the "right audience". It is now looking for additional metrics."For us, clicks arent indicative of success," said Arnold. "Were actively trying to figure out what other real-time signals we can find that showthat our message has broken through. Things like dwell-time, and viewability are some."More broadly, he asserted that publishers needed to be "more transparent" in their activity to make programmatic more common, as at themoment "there are shady things going on".
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 126"If publishers do that, brands will work with them," Arnold said.Havas Worldwide Launches Shared Owned & Earned Media UnitThe launch of Havas Worldwide New Yorks Shared Owned & Earned (SOE) media unit, which the integrated marketing communications agencywill announce tomorrow, reflects a shift in the way brands evaluate their marketing campaigns in less-traditional channels like social media.Brands want to understand the value of social and branded content in online communities, explains Richard Notarianni, Havas Worldwide NewYorks executive director of engagement planning and performance. Notarianni will lead the 21 employees that constitute the new SOE unit.‚We need to add this layer of accountability to the fastest growing channels were using in the marketing,‛ he explains. ‚As social media andbranded content come of age, accountability is a requisite.‛The SOE unit consolidates various agency disciplines around analytics, community management, and content strategy„bringing these areasinto a single practice that will be available to all of Havas Worldwide New York. According to Notarianni, this structure differs from that offeredby its competitors, which spin off their digital and analytics practices into completely separate agencies. ‚When all advertising becomes social,when accountability is everything, having a separate branded agency do this makes no sense,‛ he says.SOE, Notarianni says, brings digital capabilities into the core agency.According to a release, SOE already has active assignments from existing Havas Worldwide New York clients, including Dos Equis and ReckittBenckiser.Though currently launched as part of Havas Worldwides U.S. offering, the agency plans to expand the unit across more clients andgeographies.Targeted Serendipity: Thinking Harder About Relevanceby Steve Smith, Jan 25, 2013, 4:10 PMPerhaps its because MediaPost Editor In Chief Joe Mandese and I are the same sort of ink-stained humanists predisposed to suspicion abouttoo much automation. But at the end of our back to back OMMA DDM (Data Driven Marketing) and OMMA RTB shows, there was one panelistobservation that kept echoing in our heads: a point about the danger of marketers being too relevant all the time.On the first panel of brand marketers (see full video here) at OMMA DDM on Wednesday, executives from Hearst, Macy’s, JP Morgan Chaseand Starwood Hotels drove home the importance of relevance to the consumer. Macy’s marketer Julie Bernard, however, called out animportant exception to that rule. Personalization and customizability can be overdone, she warned. If the brand hones in too tightly andexclusively only on the things for which a user has shown an interest, then ‚You’re only ever showing me apparel and handbags,‛ she said. Thistechnique eliminates the important process of discovery.Who better to understand the value of discovery than a classic retailer? The modern department store is pretty much based on the principle ofbrowsing and happening upon the stuff you didn’t know you wanted or needed. And for women, who still do more shopping for others thanmost men, getting outside one’s own shopping zone is even more important. ‚Maybe I want to buy something for my husband once in a while,‛Bernard said. How is your personal purchase history going to help the algorithms there?To be sure, her point has to be couched within the larger value of relevance and what we really mean when we use the term. Macy’s haspioneered a number of projects that used data for one-to-one marketing efforts. The point is not that a marketer shouldn’t leverage data to beas relevant to the consumer as possible, but that relevance too tightly defined and too obsessively pursued feels mechanical and can miss alarger branding goal.As Julie shared with me later, Macy’s uses advanced modeling to target its physical and email communications to the households most likely towant them. The company especially focused now on using these data points to understand what form of communication to make to the rightcustomer.Macy’s is also trying to figure out if delivering more pages of relevant content to an interested consumer has a net productive effect. Theretailer found in these tests not only that relevance matters, but is a key driver of sales -- and that limiting a mailing to the categories thatscored as relevant did not negatively impact overall store sales. But Macy’s is also trying to determine how to encourage cross-shopping.I asked Julie to reflect on her insight further on what it means to be too doggedly relevant. She tells me, ‚So, if we see that a customer hasonly ever purchased red lipsticks, it doesnt mean we should only serve her content and offers around red lipsticks. Certainly, that would be
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 127relevant but it wouldnt deliver against our entertainment brand promise to help our customer find their magic through My Macys.... In ourexample above, rather than simply serve red lipstick content, we would be sure to serve [other] relevant content, which may be pink lipstick forthe seasonal trend, coupled with a fabulous wristlet to carry it in. An over-simplified example, but it gets to the spirit of how we are advancingrelevancy for the benefit of our customers.‚So serendipitous discovery is not necessarily ‚irrelevant‛ material, as much as content relevant in a way that a single customer profile does notreveal. As Julie puts it, ‚The wonderful thing about analytics and relevancy is that we can infer a customers preferences and then model thebehavior of other customers to understand propensities for interest in other categories, thereby introducing the discovery element for thecustomer."I would argue that a certain tedium sets in when we get targeted the same kinds of items from the same source. For example, while I stillregard Amazons recommendation engine as the gold standard for personalized experiences, it has become so well tuned to the patterns I haveestablished over the last dozen or more years of buying that the items it suggests are predictable to the point of invisibility.I am dwelling on the very human responses to machine-made ‚personalization‛ because that is one of the biggest takeaways for me from bothdrafting the OMMA DDM show and watching the discussions unfold Wednesday. The chief irony of DDM is that these highly technical,complex, algorithmically driven mechanisms behind ‚big data‛ actually force marketers to think about their customers in more rounded humanterms.That is the key message I got from the brand marketers on that first panel. I compare the massive number of new inputs available to a brandabout their customer to a pointillist painting. There are so many dots, each of which alone is without meaning, but when ordered correctly and insuch huge numbers create a recognizable impression of a person in her context. It doesn’t seem to me coincidental that the cold, technicalterminology around ‚data,‛ ‚modeling‛ and ‚algorithms‛ emerges at the same time as much more poetic references to a consumer ‚journey‛ or‚path.‛ The technology helps render a more poetic, lyrical understanding of the consumer.But that also means that the machines that interface with humans need to seem more human. For instance, my personalized Amazon page nowconfronts me with an uncomfortable mirror of only a slice of my reading habits.That is not ‚personalized‛ in the richer sense, so much as deftly targeted.At some point I wonder if data-driven marketing has to start building into the system either randomness, or a smarter kind of tangentialrelevance or targeted serendipity.2 comments on "Targeted Serendipity: Thinking Harder About Relevance".1. Nancy Brinson from Brinson Mediacommented on: January 25, 2013 at 8:20 p.m.I think you may be overlooking another factor playing a role in some consumers response (or lack thereof) to personalized messaging. Myresearch as a graduate student at NC State University indicates that a number of consumers perceive increasingly personalized advertisingmessages as a violation of their privacy, making them more likely to ignore or block these messages. How can we as marketing professionalsprovide a level of messaging personalization that will be perceived as attractive and not repellent to our consumers?2. Reg Charie from DotCom-Productionscommented on: January 28, 2013 at 9:46 p.m.I agree with Nancy. Instead of pushing suggestions based on the users past choices, I would think presenting more options (search resultpages) based on their current search phrases would strongly out perform email marketing.Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/192001/targeted-serendipity-thinking-harder-about-relev.html#ixzz2P4WQPpitO acordo do Google com os meios impressos, saiu 1 novo caminhoDo Luciano Martins Costa no Observatorio ” na materia ‘Um acordo, um ganhador’ aqui.Atentos aos fatos que geram manchetes e provocam debates, observadores da imprensa eventualmente deixam escapar acontecimentosfortuitos que podem ser sinais importantes de mudanças no cenário da mídia.Veja-se, por exemplo, a notícia publicada no fim de semana sobre o acordo feito entre o Google e o governo da França, pelo qual a maiorempresa de catalogaçao e busca na internet vai criar um fundo para remunerar os jornais franceses. Muito mais do que encaminhar uma
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 128soluçao para a questao dos direitos sobre conteúdo jornalístico na internet, a decisao representa 1 ponto de mudança na relaçao entre a mídiatradicional e os meios digitais nativos. Com ampla vantagem para os digitais.Pelo acordo, que colocou em condiçoes de igualdade, à mesma mesa, o presidente do conselho de administraçao do Google, Eric Schmidt, e opresidente da França, François Hollande, a empresa vai ajudar os jornais franceses a melhorar o desempenho de suas receitas de publicidadeonline e destinar €60 milhoes para financiar projetos de inovaçao na imprensa.O acontecimento, embora pouco explorado após o anúncio oficial, feito na 6a feira, 1º, pode representar um marco importante no processo demudança pelo qual passa a mídia. Um dos aspectos a serem observados é o fato de que a soluçao foi encontrada com a intervençao do poderpúblico, o que coloca o Estado como protagonista de um momento relevante nas relaçoes de 2 setores da iniciativa privada que representam opassado e o futuro do sistema de negócios de informaçao.Lets ban the word Television - epiloguePosted: 16 Jan 2013 07:04 PM PSTEven though I was going to tackle some other thorny subjects as the new year starts, I must one more time come back to what has become mymost read and shared TV posts from 2012 (if you missed them, part 1 is here, and part 2 is here).The reason I wanted to add this epilogue is that a good friend and much admired thinker sent me some really interesting comments and Iwanted to share them with you.Alex Bicknell is a marketing and connections strategist whom I have come to admire a great deal. He runs his own consultancy Tommorw:AM.From the website this is what they offer:Tomorrow:AM is an entrepreneur implant ” injecting urgency, accountability and passion into marketing.“ Consumer driven thinking to deliver better, faster.“ Business issue to creative marketing strategy: non-stop.“ Focus where it matters.I have worked with Alex over the last three+ years to design and deliver the Anheuser-Busch InBev way of Marketing, and specificallyConnection Planning, and along the way I learned a great deal from Alex.I share with you his comments, and add to them my own replies/POV:A: I like your imperative to ban the word "Television". Most media terminology is obsolete, in my opinion. Chez Bicknell (by no means earlyadopters on this type of thing), weve finally switched to cable about 3 months ago (though as you observe, we havent bothered to use the TV-as-internet-access features at all, because we dont need to, and our other devices all have much faster processors).As a result we watch most of our programmes recorded and simply skip the ads. Even when watching "live" TV, we tend to pause itoccasionally (to do something very English, like make a cup of tea). By the time the ad breaks come we are watching with enough delay that wecan simply skip forward through them. I reckon our exposure to TV ads has dropped at least 90%. If I was buying media in a market like theUK Id be seriously considering giving up on broadcast TV entirely. I wonder whether "pre roll" online video is a solution, or a stop gap. Will itavoid being skippable, as technology matures?M: when the remote control came out, and its use became widespread there was a real fear that TV commercials were going to be skipped asa result of zapping. The reality turned out to be much less dramatic, but it certainly had an effect.Then the video recorder came and again there was widespread fear that programs were going to be recorded and ads were going to beskipped. The reality was not so dramatic, which was more due to the inadequate and cumbersome technology rather than people wanting toskip ads.And then came the DVR...
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 129Now thatmost homes in developed markets are DVR-ed, we have a much more powerful tool to skip adds: the digitally enhanced fast-forward. And thereis an even more aggressive option, which is the one offered in the US by satellite TV distributor Dish Network.Satellite used to be able to deliver far more channels into homes vs. TV at similar cost as compared to cable. But as digital cable took hold, thisadvantage all but disappeared. So Dish needed something new to retain and gain customers (who were leaving their service in favor of cable)and what better way than killing the very revenue source that allows the programs to be made in the first place…The Dish DVR is called Hopper, which offers the Auto Hop service. If enabled it will skip ads and if you use it, this is how will offer that to you:Obviously not a good thing for advertisers,and a great many networks are suing Dish for offering the service. And cable operators TimeWarner and Comcast have filed patents fortechnology that actually prevents consumers from doing exactly what is done at Chez Bicknell (and Chez Albarda as well), which is the fastforwarding through pre-recorded or paused programs.What is interesting is that a search on the mighty Google yields no results in terms of how big (or small) the ad skipping problem really is. Ifound some seriously out-of-date numbers for TIVO when it was the hot new thing back in 2008 but nothing more recent.Should advertisers follow the networks and sue? Or should we just shrug and find better video connection opportunities that consumers won’t(or can’t) skip? I suggest the latter in my previous TV posts.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 130Alex addresses this as well:A: Itll be interesting to see what happens to creative content if media spend disappears. Who pays for production? Ive argued since Napsterthat some creative industries - music and books are obvious examples - will flourish even if no-one can make money out of copyright anymore.Artists will learn to make money through different offers (live music, for example). And anyway, most really great music and literature is drivenby the creativity - written in back rooms and recorded in the garage.Theres no evidence we get better stuff from "established" acts and authors (arguably the reverse - new acts and authors are fresher), andwhile the publishing business is crucial for sharpening quality through editing, theres no evidence it adds any value in the process of promoting,distributing etc that cant be replaced by social media.And theres no evidence it depends on a small number of "star" acts. No evidence that a great industry in terms of content production has tobe one in which the likes of JK Rowling and Adele get spectacularly rich. Crucially, theres low cost of production.For movies and TV the same cant hold. Maybe films can monetize through merchandising? Otherwise, what else? Product placement?M: these are all incredibly valid points and questions, some of which are beginning to answer themselves. I mentioned the YouTube channels,which are a self-selecting eco-system in that if you are capable of delivering content and an audience on an on-going basis, you have yourselfa source of ad-revenue (by sharing in YouTube’s revenue).Then there is Mobcaster, the Kickstarter for TV content. And all of this content is finding its way into our living room through smart TV’s (oncewe finally hook them up…) and other screens.In the music industry there is PledgeMusic, a similar initiative where artists get pre-paid by basically selling their CD’s/downloads before theyare even released. In the book industry there is the boom in self-publishing; an area where Guy Kawasaki has been very vocal and eloquent (aswell as giving you a complete free tutorial in self publishing).The one area where there still seems to be a struggle is in news/journalism. No doubt that citizen-journalism is carving out a place but ‚real‛journalism costs time and money. To date it seems that the old journalism model is slowly falling apart (the demise of Newsweek), but newermodels have not really been successful in replacing the significant ad dollars needed to fund high-end journalism. I have no doubt though thatsmart people with disruptive minds (like FlipBoard?) will find a model here, too.
  • Babelfish Articles May 2012 - April2013 v1 15-5-13 Page 131What is interesting is that most of these models rely on people paying a participation fee or subscription. Does that mean that advertising isbecoming less important as a source of revenue for content creators?Thank you, Alex, for prompting all these additional thoughts. One thing is certain: we can trust the always insightful Albert Einstein, who said ‚Inever think of the future - it comes soon enough.‛Kids addicted to fast food appBy Petra Starke, National Social Media and Technology ReporterNews Limited NetworkDecember 17, 2012 12:00AMHungry Jacks was singled out for "Encouraging a young audience to consume unhealthy food any time" via a simple shake of their phone.Picture: SuppliedDIETITIANS are pushing to ban a smartphone app that dishes out free hamburgers and fries at Hungry Jacks restaurants, saying children arebecoming addicted to the promotion and are putting their health at risk.Since the "Hungry Jacks Makes it Better" app was launched five months ago, doctors have reported seeing children and teens who havebecome "addicted" to it, with one Sydney dietitian reporting a morbidly obese 15-year-old patient using the app every day to score discountedfood.Paediatric dietitian Jessica Lee, of Brisbane child obesity clinic CHOC4Kids, this week launched an onli