Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 1
Articles
Dec 2013 –April 2014
Brian Crotty
Babelfish.Brazil@gmail.c...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 2
Summary
How Media Agencies Can Stay Relevant in a Programmatic Age ...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 3
New cars will soon come with high-bandwidth connections and app sto...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 4
OMD's Ben Winkler Explains Programmatic's Branding Promise ...........
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 5
The alternative uses for your mobile phone............................
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 6
Media Agencies: Size Matters..........................................
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 7
People swap devices 21 times an hour, says OMD........................
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 8
How Media Agencies Can Stay Relevant in a Programmatic Age (Despite...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 9
will win (or fail), how mobile will continue to change our lives, e...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 10
EMEA; they just want to engage with the brand on their own terms. ...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 11
– Roy Badawi, Managing Director, DigitasLBi MINA
More mobile bandw...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 12
and cheaper, we’ll see the reality of a connected experience truly...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 13
– Nicolas Dubost, Strategic Planner, DigitasLBi France
Big Data: T...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 14
Product Videos Boost ROI, Intent To Purchase
by Daisy Whitney, Thu...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 15
everything from the number of steps you take, to the average speed...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 16
The deal between the two companies -- which will dismiss all litig...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 17
platform, for instance). If this data can be used to create progra...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 18
will be "built in" to the device itself, as was the case with Nike...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 19
among viewers. How did it not get lost amid the tantalizing displa...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 20
allows us to focus, while the cute factor of the animals releases ...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 21
will enable them to plan and target online users with key MRI audi...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 22
The emergence of "small data." The value and functionality of your...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 23
How to Convert a Curious Researcher into a Paying Customer
Posted ...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 24
The industries they work in (I have a disturbing percentage of fri...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 25
Skimming over lots of different topics in a single blog post, is a...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 26
There are a few other things to consider but are sometimes harder ...
Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 27
In the closing session of the Association of National Advertisers'...
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14

9,400 views

Published on

Just sharing a compilation of articles that I collected for my ongoing growth. First 13 articles are my must reads. All articles have key text highlighted for quick scan. Last 3 editions have had: 5K, 4k and 10k of views respectively.

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
9,400
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
33
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Babelfish: Articles Dec 2013 to April 2014 22-4-14

  1. 1. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 1 Articles Dec 2013 –April 2014 Brian Crotty Babelfish.Brazil@gmail.com
  2. 2. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 2 Summary How Media Agencies Can Stay Relevant in a Programmatic Age (Despite CMOs' Plans) ........................8 DigitasLBi: Global Leaders Offer 2014 Predictions....................................................................................8 Product Videos Boost ROI, Intent To Purchase.......................................................................................14 The 'Internet of Things' Will Reshape Advertising Agencies....................................................................14 Disney-Dish's Ground-Breaking TV/Streaming Deal Disables AutoHop For ABC....................................15 Programmatic TV Buying ........................................................................................................................16 2014: Advertising industry to see massive disruptions ............................................................................17 The Irresistible Power of Storytelling as a Strategic Business Tool .........................................................18 GfK Strikes Deal With Big 3 DMPs, Offers Key MRI Segments For Online Targeting..............................20 The Next Gen Apps Will Be All About You, But Will the Value of Highly Personalized Experiences Trump Privacy Concerns?..................................................................................................................................21 4 Lessons on Brand Storytelling from Ad Age's Digital Conference.........................................................22 How to Convert a Curious Researcher into a Paying Customer ..............................................................23 Why (and how) programmatic works at Kimberly-Clark...........................................................................26 Kimberly-Clark insists on owning data.....................................................................................................29 Social Media: Just A PART Of TV Program Marketing............................................................................29 Why Social TV Has the Power to Change the Media World as We Know It.............................................30 Working With Google? You've Got to Embrace Co-opetition...................................................................32 Segmentation Is The Key To Successful Sales, Profit And Growth .........................................................34 How Big Advertisers Are Using Next-Gen Messaging Apps Snapchat, Kik, Tango, Line and WeChat ....35 Twitter Offering 15 New Ad Types...........................................................................................................37 The Death of CPM ..................................................................................................................................38 Innerscope Wins Award For Research Paper on TV Vs. Online Consumer Engagement........................39 One Awesome Interview Technique to Start Using .................................................................................40 Research Report How Advertising Performs in a Social Media World .....................................................41 Facebook Connectivity Lab to use drones, lasers and satellites to deliver internet..................................41 Brazil reaches digital tipping point...........................................................................................................42 The Future of Online Publishers: Three Key Trends ...............................................................................43 The Promise of Wearable Technologies..................................................................................................44 Mindshare and The Weather Company Partner to Bring Weather Insights to Real-Time Marketing........46 What Is the Future of Proximity Marketing?.............................................................................................47 Content Marketing: What NOT To Do .....................................................................................................48 NFC takes another blow as 7-Eleven, Best Buy shut it down ..................................................................49 NFC will not power US mobile payments: Forrester ................................................................................51 What They're Saying about Mobile Payments.........................................................................................52 23 anúncios criativos que souberam chamar a atenção..........................................................................53 What's the ROI of Analytics? (Part 1)......................................................................................................69 What's the ROI of Analytics? (Part 2)......................................................................................................70 What's the ROI of Analytics? (Part 3)......................................................................................................71 IBM Study: CMOs Fusing Internal and External Data to Drive Financial Success ...................................72 Apps by the Dashboard Light..................................................................................................................74 Singing Out Loud is Top Activity While Driving; One in Four Admit to Texting.........................................76
  3. 3. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 3 New cars will soon come with high-bandwidth connections and app stores. ...........................................79 Google's Android Wear Gets The Jump In Smartwatches.......................................................................80 MasterCard Gives Cardholders Huge 'Surprises' ....................................................................................82 Study: social media isn't replacing traditional news outlets at all .............................................................83 Debrief / SXSW.......................................................................................................................................84 A Comprehensive List of Online Video Ad Types and Formats, Pros and Cons......................................87 The Video Viewability Debate .................................................................................................................91 Kevin Van Lenten is chief revenue officer at Vertical Search Works........................................................92 Digital Chameleon Releases 2014 Digital IQ Index .................................................................................94 The One Thing You Must Do to Hire Better People and Find Better Jobs ...............................................96 The Power Players in the Publicis-Omnicom Merger...............................................................................97 Counting Counts: Six Reasons Everyone Must Read Erwin Ephron's Book 'Media Planning' .................99 Top Fifteen Interesting Observations About Brazil and Brazilians .........................................................100 Key Trends for 2014: Always-On Commerce ........................................................................................101 Word of Mouth's Measurement Imperative............................................................................................102 Comércio eletrônico cresce 217% na black friday e bate todos os recordes .........................................103 Mobile Commerce in Brazil Slow to Take but Gaining Momentum ........................................................103 Bradesco inaugurates the era of sponsored mobile Internet..................................................................104 The Traditional Purchase Funnel Is Kaput Enter the 'always on' consumer...........................................105 How The Google/comScore Partnership Can Fundamentally Change Latino Marketing .......................106 3 Reasons Why Search Marketers Should Prepare For Mobile Wearable Devices ...............................107 A Profound Look At The Future Of Media - On An Episode Of 'The Waltons'?......................................108 Here's what the internet could look like in 2025.....................................................................................109 Project Blueprint: Cross Platform Measurement's Big Leap Forward.....................................................111 Innovation and Personal Branding ........................................................................................................112 5 Most Common Mistakes in Social Media............................................................................................114 Here’s How Comcast Plans to Rule American Cable and Internet.........................................................115 SXSWi Postmortem ..............................................................................................................................117 Small agencies wary of programmatic...................................................................................................118 Ad Agencies Should Produce In-House Video To Promote Branded Content .......................................119 Mobile Creating Cavern Between Retailers, Brands, Consumers..........................................................120 MasterCard Taps Man/Machine Interaction At SXSW, Uses A Vending Machine .................................121 How Will YOU Use the LinkedIn Publishing Platform? ..........................................................................122 How to Use the New LinkedIn Publishing Platform................................................................................123 5 Reasons You Need Buyer Personas..................................................................................................124 SXSW, Not All That Keeps CMOs Up at Night ......................................................................................125 VivaKi Search Catches Automation Bug ...............................................................................................126 A True Integrated Marketing Framework...............................................................................................127 Investing in Big Content Assets for Big Returns ....................................................................................129 Walmart Flexing Hybrid Stores To Bridge Digital Gap...........................................................................131 Screen Time: TV Time-Shifted Viewing Rises Cross-Platform ..............................................................132 What Not To Say In A Job Interview......................................................................................................133 Facebook is in talks to buy Titan Aerospace Internet acess drones, .....................................................134
  4. 4. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 4 OMD's Ben Winkler Explains Programmatic's Branding Promise ..........................................................135 The 3 digital trends to watch in 2014.....................................................................................................136 The only discipline technique you'll ever need.......................................................................................137 The Truth About Branding, Marketing And Advertising..........................................................................138 This is the new era of kinship................................................................................................................139 Subscription Vs. Free: The Future of Short-Form Vs. Long-Form Video................................................140 VivaKi Joins OpenVV Group .................................................................................................................141 Online video moves closer to TV...........................................................................................................142 10 predictions for the future of TV .........................................................................................................142 Mindshare Puts Clients In 'The Loop'....................................................................................................145 AOL to Build First Cross-Screen Programmatic Advertising Platform - ONE By AOL............................146 This Cheat Sheet for Content Marketing Will Make Your Day - The metrics that matter......................148 Apple Is Already Building Its Next Massive Business And No One Seems To Have Noticed.................149 Universal Truth......................................................................................................................................150 The Connected TV Landscape: Why Smart TVs And Streaming Gadgets Are Conquering The Living Room....................................................................................................................................................153 Mobile advertising more than twice as effective as desktop, BBC World News study shows.................154 How Esri and Aisle411 Show You Where It's at in Context ...................................................................155 Google unveils smartphone with 3D sensors ........................................................................................156 Five technologies that will change business in 2014 .............................................................................158 Ad Tech’s Dirty Little Secret..................................................................................................................159 AgênciaClick Isobar creates " aeroperto " application to Infraero ..........................................................160 The Art of Crafting a 15-Word Strategy Statement ................................................................................160 Walmart Pursuing Both 'Stock-Up' And 'Fill-In' Customers ....................................................................161 Google acquires password-killing startup SlickLogin.............................................................................162 Study: 48 Percent Of Consumers Considered ‘Always On’ ...................................................................163 The Cookie Debate: Research Reveals Advertisers Pay 3X More For Cookie-Based Ads....................164 Nike+ FuelBand Sums Up Your Fitness Year With A Colorful Poster....................................................165 Four Tips for Better Strategic Planning .................................................................................................165 Three ways to fix the flawed agency model...........................................................................................166 The End of Microsites ...........................................................................................................................167 Let's Stop Thinking About Mobile Just as a Channel or Tactic and Move on to a Bigger Idea ...............169 Shazam Gets 700k Super Bowl Listens, But What Is The Second Screen's Second Act?.....................170 Facebook Paper....................................................................................................................................171 15 media executives in Latin American - what to expect for 2014 .........................................................171 Why do companies survive only with innovation?..................................................................................180 BITCOIN: How It Works, And Why It Could One Day Threaten Legacy Payments Tools Like Credit Cards .............................................................................................................................................................181 Can You Measure Engagement? ..........................................................................................................182 IAB Explores Alternatives To Cookies...................................................................................................185 It's official: real time, now dead. ............................................................................................................186 Seven top tech predictions for 2014......................................................................................................186 9 Ways Social Media Marketing Will Change in 2014............................................................................189
  5. 5. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 5 The alternative uses for your mobile phone...........................................................................................191 The Instagram Rule of 11......................................................................................................................192 How to Prove the ROI of an Event ........................................................................................................193 Digital Billboards Ruled Safe, But Controversy Continues.....................................................................196 Omnicom Taps Mindshare's Zonfrillo as Head of Global Trading..........................................................196 Xbox Numbers for Brazil .......................................................................................................................197 IBM and The North Face seek to reshape ecommerce .........................................................................197 Retail Ecommerce Sales in Brazil to See Double-Digit Growth This Year .............................................199 Facebook Tweaks News Feed Algorithm Again ....................................................................................200 Facebook could fade out like a disease, lose 80 per cent of users, say US researchers.......................201 Controversial Paper Predicts Facebook Decline ...................................................................................201 Advertising Vs. Agencies, Dinosaurs Vs. Cockroaches.........................................................................202 Retailers need social media presence...................................................................................................203 Globo.com segments its audience ........................................................................................................204 YouTube, DreamWorks Animation To Co-Produce Original Programming............................................205 The future of food..................................................................................................................................205 Agency of the Year, Best Media Planning & Buying: MediaVest ...........................................................206 TV Nets Don't Synchronize Cross-Platform Screens.............................................................................208 Johnson & Johnson Super Serves Us With Workout App .....................................................................209 The Blueprint for a Real Content Marketing Plan ..................................................................................209 Facebook shows 4 digital marketing trends for 2014.............................................................................211 How many KPIs are optimal to drive agency performance? ..................................................................211 There Is a Digital Talent Gap - Wide chasm between expertise needed and available..........................214 The World Changing Ideas Of 2014......................................................................................................214 Augmented Reality Gets to Work ..........................................................................................................217 Video Leads Consumer Preference for Mobile Ads in Brazil .................................................................219 Infographic CVs Gimmick or Useful Tool?.............................................................................................219 Why Trust Someone Else To Protect Your Data? .................................................................................221 10 Web Analytics Trends for 2014 ........................................................................................................221 Who's Going To Shoot Your Corporate Video? .....................................................................................224 From The 'Big 3' To 'Big Data:' TV Audience Targeting Comes Of Age.................................................225 The Blueprint for a Real Content Marketing Plan ..................................................................................227 GroupM Addresses Addressability, Taps Bologna To Run New Advanced TV Ad Targeting Unit .........229 Live From Las Vegas: SMG Unveils New Content Marketing Platform..................................................230 Five trends to watch at CES..................................................................................................................230 Danone seeks to emulate Google .........................................................................................................232 14 things every successful person has in common ...............................................................................233 Google's Ad Revenue Per User Is Insanely Ahead Of Its Rivals ...........................................................235 Groups Propose Integrating Ad-ID Into 'UPC' For All Media, Advertising Content.................................235 Wunderman, MEC 'Choreograph' A New Venture.................................................................................236 Mary Meeker Is Right/Mary Meeker Is Wrong .......................................................................................236 Check Out How The Tablet Just Replaced The PC For People Buying Computers ..............................237 .............................................................................................................................................................238
  6. 6. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 6 Media Agencies: Size Matters...............................................................................................................238 Digital Ad Spending in Brazil Is an Increasing Share of the Media Market.............................................240 Google Will Now Only Charge For Ads That People Can Actually See .................................................241 Even Google Employees Are Giving Up On Google Glass....................................................................242 Five Life Stages Of A Social Platform ...................................................................................................243 Semantic advertising increases engagement ........................................................................................244 LatAm affluents are social and digital....................................................................................................245 Brazil will see the World Cup on home TV , reveals study.....................................................................245 Media Consolidation Is Revolutionizing Marketing ................................................................................246 To Understand Consumer Data, Think Like an Anthropologist..............................................................247 Why Better Listeners are Better Innovators...........................................................................................248 Lenovo Taps TubeMogul, Requires Its Agencies To Use For Video Buys.............................................249 JWT: Consumers Are Fed Up With Technology And Change ...............................................................250 Facebook Admits Organic Reach Is Falling Short, Urges Marketers to Buy Ads ...................................250 Bezos' Brain - And Other Anomalies .....................................................................................................251 Internet Natives: They Know More than They - or You -Think ...............................................................253 Making data work..................................................................................................................................257 Amazon: Mass, Affluent, Or Luxury Retailer?........................................................................................258 TNT Debuts Twitter-TV Integration For 'Mob City' .................................................................................259 TV Everywhere Clicks, Authenticated Video Views Soar 217%.............................................................260 Time-Shifted TV Watching Rises, Net Use Dips....................................................................................261 Inside Amazon's Kindle Tablet Ecosystem, Arguably The Most Underrated Mobile Platform ................261 Report: Video Advertising In Online And Mobile Games Is Poised For Growth In 2014.........................262 Aegis Group launches operation programmatic media in Brazil ............................................................263 Breaking Through the Brain’s Barriers ..................................................................................................265 Forget Big Data: 10 Simple Ways To Drive Revenue With 'Little' Data..................................................266 Where Branded Content Dollars Are Going...........................................................................................267 Content Needs To Work Harder In Shopper Marketing .........................................................................268 Phablet & Programmatic Will Win In 2014.............................................................................................269 CEOs Are Jittery About Consumer Experience .....................................................................................270 7 predictions for social TV in 2014 ........................................................................................................270 To-Do: Fewer Predictions, More Resolutions ........................................................................................271 To Diversify Your Network, Follow the 2+1 Rule ...................................................................................273 Ford Social Trends Study Speaks To Our Behavior ..............................................................................274 Big Data 2.0: the next generation of Big Data .......................................................................................275 Complex Sales and the Persona Creation Process...............................................................................277 Video Ad Recall Higher on Tablets........................................................................................................278 Unilever: Mobile is Key to Reaching the "Unreachables" [Video]...........................................................279 It's Time to Bring Data Scientists on Sales Calls ...................................................................................280 When Will We Finally Get It? It's All About The Content!.......................................................................281 Segmentation Is The Key To Successful Sales, Profit And Growth .......................................................282 Big Lift In Digital, Mobile Sales Over Holidays.......................................................................................283 Three Strategies to Improve Agency-Client Relationships in '14 ...........................................................284
  7. 7. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 7 People swap devices 21 times an hour, says OMD...............................................................................286 Product managers: Vision, instinct & obsession. (And the rest).............................................................288 When Winning Feels Like Losing ..........................................................................................................291 The Most Successful Leaders Do 15 Things Automatically, Every Day.................................................292 Why You're Not A Leader......................................................................................................................293 14 things every successful person has in common ...............................................................................295 Navigating The Wild West of Data Analytics: 6 Steps To Help You Get There ......................................297 An Agency Perspective on Attribution ...................................................................................................298 How Telstra is bringing multichannel experiences to life .......................................................................300 Trends Snapshot: The future of native advertising ................................................................................302 13 Things We Learned In 2013.............................................................................................................306 The 12 Best Social Media Marketing Tips of 2013 ................................................................................308 Google and The Laws of Robotics ........................................................................................................309 DirecTV Credits Addressable Ads With Future Ad Growth ....................................................................310 Survey Analysis: Customers Rate Their BI Platform Functionality.........................................................310 Facebook Admits Organic Reach Is Falling Short, Urges Marketers to Buy Ads ...................................342 Olympics, Mobile Drive Three New Ad Forecasts, but Europe Stays a Concern ...................................343 We Should All Be Thankful For Advertising...........................................................................................344 DigitasLBi and Razorfish Broker Pre-Newfront 2014 Partner Deal with Google.....................................345 Ad Forecast: 2014's Minor Growth, Major Theme Of Advertising Definition...........................................345 Nielsen Data: TV Dominates Time, Same As It Ever Was.....................................................................346 Payment Terms' Negative Trend for Agencies and Nielsen, Limited Practical Impact ...........................348 Some Uncomfortable Questions About Jeff Bezos' Unmanned Amazon Prime Death* Drones.............350 WPP Merges Xaxis With 24/7 Media In Bid For Scale In Programmatic Ads.........................................351
  8. 8. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 8 How Media Agencies Can Stay Relevant in a Programmatic Age (Despite CMOs' Plans) Offer a Holistic View That Puts All Marketing Options in the Best Context By:Sean Cunningham Published: December 03, 2013 Better than half of CMOs surveyed by The CMO Club say they're looking to bypass media agencies in buying TV time using automated buying tech. Certainly, clients with mounds of customer data and direct-buying platforms could go direct to programmers. But should they? And how does the media agency stay relevant? Ultimately, the data and technology supporting media will require more, not less, agency support. For one thing, you need a holistic view of brand marketing to put programmatic in the right context -- how much to do, where, when and why. For another, the non-programmatic elements of media will do more to make or break brands in a world where social media is a reflex. They're not so much impressions as conversations, where audiences committed to TV content stretch their interaction across all the screens they have. Weaving brands into TV content and conversations is what agencies do best. They know the nuances of clients' strategies and products. They know how all of the media work and, more importantly, work together. They know how to turn this knowledge into partnerships with networks that can give a brand a place in consumer-generated conversations. That's why networks routinely come to agencies with creative ideas. Most importantly, agencies know how to balance this art with the science of media so clients sell more stuff. This power is the key to agencies standing taller than ever in TV. How? It starts with content development that pulls together script integration, product placement, co-branded ads, interstitials, social media topicality, events, ITV and talent endorsement across screens. Agencies can concentrate their best minds on multiscreen development -- something programmatic can't do -- for every brand they advance. Think hybrid teams creating brand content that feeds the commitment audiences have to their favorite shows -- so they take it everywhere they go -- and the rise to leadership positions of people who get the full context of clients' businesses. Then agencies will be structured for bigger, more targeted partnerships with programmers. Here's where it gets exciting. When machines process the routine elements of buying, agencies can devote more of their energy to the essential, creative job of activating consumers who are committed to particular programs. In other words, they can build a client a central role in the show experience that extends everywhere the mobile web takes the topic of TV. Fittingly, many programming networks are making multiscreen integrations standard because they see how activity on each screen feeds the others. In the long run, programmatic buying should restore media agencies to the privileged position they've earned over decades, as the arbiters of consumer strategy and commitment. By focusing on a brand's need to sell more stuff in a complicated landscape, they'll assure that clients use the automating technologies where they make the most sense. They'll create the content that makes brands part of the best stories on TV. And they'll translate consumers' commitments to their favorite shows into deeper experiences, more trial and more sales for client brands. DigitasLBi: Global Leaders Offer 2014 Predictions Jan 6, 2014 Adotas What’s on the horizon for 2014? DigitasLBi leaders across the globe recently offered their predictions for brands and agencies everywhere. From worldwide trends to local market-level predictions, see the insights that every global marketer needs to know: the social networks that
  9. 9. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 9 will win (or fail), how mobile will continue to change our lives, exactly how marketers will design for consumers, the technology that they’ll use, and what’s next for big data . Social Content: LinkedIn will be the big winner in 2014: LinkedIn has proven itself to be extremely marketer-savvy, working with brands to create sponsored content and influencer strategies, while using its rich data to help guide consumer engagement. And while Facebook is making headlines for forcing more pay-to-play engagement, LinkedIn has found a healthy middle between owned and paid content for marketers. Obviously platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter shouldn’t be discounted—they’re making significant progress in meeting marketer expectations— but in 2014, LinkedIn will be the big winner as it continues to develop customized solutions and profit from them. Real-time marketing: it will get better (and bigger). Despite some recent backlash, real-time marketing is here to stay. In 2014, we’ll see deeper investment from brands and agencies both in terms of budget and time spent. And, we’ll start to see greater integration of RTM into every day brand building versus just one-off moments — or, using the newsroom analogy, think more feature stories vs. breaking news. The result will be a substantial increase in quality content that anticipates what audiences need and want—it won’t all be reactive à la the Super Bowl blackout, but if done correctly, it’ll feel right in the moment. And though social will continue to lead the way as marketers’ choice of medium for RTM, we’ll see greater expansion into other channels as well,including DOOH. – Anne-Marie Kline, SVP, Social Content / Managing Director, BrandLIVE, DigitasLBi North America. In APAC, Facebook gets less social. In Asia, 2014 will see a significant shift for teenagers from Facebook to messenger services for their social interactions. It’s not the death of Facebook by any means (in fact their user base will probably continue to grow) but the level of interactions on the platform will decrease. In the APAC region, where in some markets people have skipped the purchase of a desktop/laptop altogether and gone straight to mobile, the prominence of messenger services and the adoption of sophisticated platforms like WeChat and Line will continue to grow. – Amit Patel, PR & Content Strategist, DigitasLBi Hong Kong The demise of Tuenti. Tuenti, a Spanish-based social network (known to many as the Spanish Facebook) has been very popular in the past amongst teenagers. But it seems destined to become the next one-hit-social media wonder. The last few months have seen a consistent decrease in traffic, with its youngest users leaving for Instagram and mobile messaging apps like Whatsapp. Tuenti has also failed to monetize their platform—advertising is extremely expensive and inflexible, with limited API availability only for Goliath-sized clients. Everything points to Telefónica either shutting down this once-promising social platform or converting it into a Whatsapp or Line-styled messaging app, while maintaining themobile operator side of Tuenti for “lo quiero todo papi” young consumers. – Eugenio Sanz, Social Media Strategist, DigitasLBi Spain Social goes back to basics. In 2014 we’ll see a rise in the simplification of the big social platforms: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and more. Ironically, as companies invest more in their social strategies, more of them will shut down or decrease their number of social accounts: Facebook page merges, the closing and signposting of Twitter accounts, etc. Global brands will develop solutions for use in multiple markets in several languages –they’re the ones spending the most on advertising, so they’ll create tools with their needs in mind. Facebook and LinkedIn are on the right track with global pages – this approach will hopefully be implemented across all social platforms. Consumers don’t classify themselves as living in APAC or
  10. 10. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 10 EMEA; they just want to engage with the brand on their own terms. And hopefully this will also prompt YouTube to reopen some of the inactive usernames for brands. – Darcie Tanner, Head of Social Media Management, DigitasLBi U.K. Mobile: WeChat takes on the world. With over 100 million users outside of China—and a whopping 600 million total—WeChat is on track to become the most popular chat app in the world. Just last month the Global Web Index declared it the fastest growing social app used by youths worldwide, with a 1,021% increase amongst that set in 2013—all without even factoring in growth in China. What’s more is that unlike current leader WhatsApp, owning company Tencent has made a significant investment in their app’s e-commerce and marketing functionalities, making WeChat a natural fit for brands. All combined, in 2014 we’ll see WeChat head straight to the top. – Justin Peyton, Strategy Director MENA & Asia Pacific at DigitasLBi (Singapore) Mobile will bring your physical and digital existence closer together. Portable devices – be they phones or tablets or something new – are increasingly aware of your surroundings in a way that desktop computers can’t usefully be. Your phone knows where you are, can recognise North and can tell the time. But imagine a phone that knows when it’s dark, reacts to noises, recognises colours, and responds to temperature; a small device that knows what you’re doing, who you’re with and how much you paid to do it. In 2014, we’ll see that all come together. Shopping will be everywhere. Flipboard allows you to be a magazine editor; Pinterest and Fab enable you to aggregate and curate content to your heart’s content. Watch as these “magazines” become “catalogues,” and every consumer becomes an “affiliate” making money off the back of a buy button in magazines they have curated. The shopping experience will start to migrate from brands and retailers to individual products, wherever they are shared across multiple social platforms and apps. - Ilicco Elia, Head of Mobile, DigitasLBi U.K. Mobile becomes the focus of creating loyalty. We have already seen mobile apps like Key Ring and Apple’s Passport begin to supplant physical “loyalty” cards. Moving forward, we’ll see marketers using mobile in even richer ways. As mobile becomes core to all aspects of the consumer journey, brands will focus on using mobile to create experiences that deliver value and inspire emotional connection. Mobile payments, incidentally, will get rolled out as a component of mobile loyalty experiences. The next generation of cross-channel ad tech platforms comes from mobile. The future reality of all digital marketing will be data-rich, natively focused and cookie-less—much like mobile is today. As we see the shift of user engagement continue to flow in the direction of mobile—and in many instances in favor of mobile — the market will demand ad tech solutions that allow them to reach people across screens. These new ad tech platforms will likely be tied initially to a specific ecosystem, e.g., Google, Facebook, Twitter or Amazon. My bet is that Facebook will get there first. – Chia Chen, SVP, North America Mobile Practice Lead, DigitasLBi Say goodbye to cash and credit cards—mobile replaces everything in the UAE. In 2013, the Prime Minster of the UAE, Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, released a mandate for all government agencies to start providing their services via mobile. Since then, everything is going mobile, from using your phone to get on the metro, to checking in at the airport, to paying utility bills—and more. In 2014, these processes will become second nature; mobile will replace boarding passes, loyalty cards, credit cards, and even cash payments. In the UAE, mobile innovation is no longer just the purview of tech companies—it’s a government priority. Businesses and tourism will reap the benefits of that.
  11. 11. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 11 – Roy Badawi, Managing Director, DigitasLBi MINA More mobile bandwidth in Germany—and better social as a result. Mobile is nothing new to Germany. But with recent massive increases in bandwidth (in particular, the availability and adoption of LTE), mobile will have a huge effect on German marketers in 2014. We’ll see German brands adapt their social media strategies to mobile devices. And since more bandwidth means higher quality content, that also means greater German consumer and brand adoption of global image/video platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, Vine, etc. - Florian Schießl, Account Manager, DigitasLBi Germany Creative Design The rise of inclusive design. 2013 was a big year for responsive design. In 2014, that trend will evolve into a more holistic “inclusive web design” approach that renews the focus on users and builds a single- or multi-platform presence for brands. The ever-growing range of devices and screens, and people’s varied usage, requires both the write-once-run-everywhere and highly specialized device specific solutions. Inclusive design will result in hyper-personalized, customized and tailored experiences, moving away from the egalitarian experience that purely responsive sites deliver. – Rasmus Frandsen, Creative Director, DigitasLBi Denmark The end of fake 3D. Here is a trend that started in 2013 and will continue in 2014: the end of fake 3D, drop shadows, and Apple’s skeuomorphism. The screen is flat and there is no reason to pretend otherwise. Even if Windows 8 had a rocky start, the design was leading the way. Google was first in adapting, Apple made its way with the release of iOS 7, and countless other web offerings – commerce as well as marketing platforms – are about to follow. Flat design in combination with translucency and semi-transparent is the way of the future. On top of that, higher screen resolution and larger screens will lead designers to make use of the space beyond the minimal viewport. – Andreas Teigeler, Executive Creative Director, DigitasLBi AG, Germany & Switzerland The best navigation is no navigation: What’s the best way to get from point A to point B? By using a single straight line, of course. When it comes to navigation, the “Keep It Simple, Stupid” philosophy is becoming more prominent as an increasing number of websites move away from the “choose your own adventure” navigation in favor of simple, concise, controlled journeys that guide the viewer seamlessly through the experience. While this structure is not appropriate in all scenarios, it’s an increasingly popular rule of thumb that will be (and should be) much more often, when appropriate. More appropriate typography: The movement to broaden the number of available webfonts has finally arrived. Most major type foundries now offer webfonts, including Monotype and FontShop. Even longstanding holdout Hoefler & Freer-Jones recently launched cloud.typography, which enables designers to use several of their modern classics (i.e. Gotham) in their designs. This is a huge technological step forward. No longer limited to a small range of system fonts, designers can take advantage of nearly any conservative or expressive font that meets their needs—which will have a huge impact on the quality – and variety – of web design. – Matthew Jacobson, SVP, Creative, DigitasLBi North America Technology The Internet of Me: 2013 was about the “Internet of Things,” and how everything around us can be identified and connected. Now, with everyday appliances and devices getting smarter, smaller,
  12. 12. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 12 and cheaper, we’ll see the reality of a connected experience truly driven by behavior. Simple predictive technologies, not unlike Google Now, will become readily available across a myriad of touch points providing personalized and adaptive experiences in every part of our lives. We’ll start to see our cars, kitchens, televisions, and phones think ahead of us and anticipate our individual intentions. Agile Marketing goes prime time. While some agencies adopted it in 2013, 2014 is the year that we’ll see more and more marketing organizations take on tenets of the Agile Methodology, which includes rapid iterations, closer collaboration (consumers included), and the heavy use of testing and data. This will be driven by the need of companies to act faster, adapt when necessary, and become more predictive in their marketing and advertising efforts. Agile over traditional conventions will ultimately allow marketers to speak directly to a consumer rather than a market segment. - Paolo Yuvienco, Global Chief Technology Officer, DigitasLBi Touch-less experiences that you can feel. In 2013, we saw a shift for a lot oftechnology from the mouse to the touchpad. In 2014, more brands will move from the touchpad to touch-less experiences, experimenting with new technologies like gesture-based MYO and sensor-based Fundawear. There are opportunities here for brands and people to meet beyond screen-based interactions; now, moving forward, we’ll see (and create) more digital experiences where people control things using voice, gesture, and eye movement. - Marcus Mustafa, Global Head of User Experience, DigitasLBi The marriage of Chinese money and U.S. tech companies. In 2014, we’ll see China become a big investor in the tech companies of Silicon Valley, particularly those looking for their second round of funding. Following Tencent’s investment in Snapchat, U.S. tech companies will court Chinese investors for large amounts of capital, while Chinese companies will see this as a rapid path to global revenue streams. - Justin Peyton, Strategy Director MENA & Asia Pacific at DigitasLBi (Singapore) Print-your-own __________ 2014 will bring about a widespread proliferation of 3D printers—not just at tech companies and ad agencies, but in the home of everyday consumers. This will mean two things: as well as seeing the potentially sinister side of this technology (3D-printed guns, anyone?) we’ll also see the amazing creative possibilities of this technology. 3D printing will go to space, fabricating replacement parts, and to the developing world as a way to help provide clean water. In 2014, 3D printing on site, and at times in hostile sites, will allow us to achieve things that were once just pipe dreams. Cyborgs for all. Next year we’ll continue to see constant and at times terrifying advances in robot technology. We are now starting to see the beginnings of what this may mean to consumers in the field of home automation, with ever more effective applications of robot technology in the form of lawnmowers, vacuums, and self-driving cars. In 2014 these technologies will become more commonplace in the home, helping with chores, completing tasks you never had to before, and hopefully ironing your clothes. - Mark Agar, Head of Technology, DigitasLBi U.K. Image recognition: technology that wins at mobile—and commerce. Next year when you want to look up a product on your phone, you may not need to type in—you’ll simply snap a photo. While mobile image recognition has been around for a few years now (likeGoogle Goggles in 2010), 2014 will be the year it really takes off. We’ll see much deeper investment and more executions from retailers—like Macy’s with their Star Gifts app, or eBay with their Motors app. And the technology itself is becoming more prevalent too—CamFind passed one million downloads in October, and thousands of developers are working on apps for Google Glass.
  13. 13. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 13 – Nicolas Dubost, Strategic Planner, DigitasLBi France Big Data: The birth of People-based analytics (PBA). With the emergence of always-on, wearable devices (such as Fitbit, Galaxy Gear, and Google Glasses) we’ll see new types of analytics for understanding audience behavior. The ability to look at real geo-location, motion, patterned behavior not just through media consumption or product purchase but through other everyday aspects of a consumer’s life creates both new data and new uses for this data. In 2014, wearable devices will help marketers deepen their understanding of the consumer’s shopping process, product consumption, and offline social interaction—and with that, they’ll find countless opportunities to add utility to their products and to the lives of their audiences. The death of Media Mix Modeling. Cross-media integration relies on ongoing optimization at the consumer level. The growth in cross-media, multi-touch attribution in 2013 (and more-so in 2014) signals the imminent extinction of Media Mix Modeling. With the ever expanding ability to truly integrate media into a Single View of the Consumer, the industry will no longer rely on the macro- level modeling to understand the true impact of media on consumer decision making. While MMM won’t totally disappear in 2014, marketer’s desires for consumer-level optimization will increase with our ability for consumer-level (programmatic) media buying across digital, social, broadcast, and mobile media. – Jason Kodish, SVP/North America Strategy & Analytics Lead, DigitasLBi The utility of mobile leads to bigger (and better) data. For years now, marketers have spoken about a post-PC digital world, with mobile at the center. In 2014 not only will we see more brands providing value to their consumers via mobile (which they should be doing already), we’ll see them leveraging bigger and better data à la Google Now. Just a few examples: public transportation apps will know and understand your personal behaviour (improving your commute), pharmaceutical companies will help you with your daily medicine intake, and more sport brands will focus on helping consumers get fit. – Chung Chao, Strategist, DigitasLBi Netherlands More full customer lifecycle attribution. Attribution modeling came about because of the need to manage media spend more effectively across digital channels. However, as far as maximising channel and conversion optimisation it’s only been the tip of the iceberg. Some agencies are already doing this, but 2014 will see an explosion of attribution evaluating touch points across not only display but also social, web, mobile (app and web), multi-visit, multi- device right through to advocacy. In short, more and more marketers will be attributing across the full customer lifecycle. Data Management Platforms (DMPs). Having been first incepted as an extension of the display advertising industry, in the U.S. Data Management Platforms (DMPs) also became a solution to data integration challenges across all channels. That trend is now moving over to Europe, with DMPs enabling personalisation, owned/bought/earned marketing consistency, increasingly complex behavioural segmentation, and ultra-advanced attribution. This space is still in its nascency here, but expect an explosion in 2014. – Alex Loveless, Head of Analytics, DigitasLBi U.K. Streamed data over bulk data. In 2014, the real-time data trend will intensify across Europe, with more companies gathering insights from streamed data vs. just bulk data. It’ll change the way European companies handle big data, with dedicated task forces responding in real-time to seize opportunities for brands. We already have the necessary technology available—what’s needed now is an evolution in analytics skill sets, as marketers learn how to harness streamed data in a way that provides real-time value to consumers, while staying ahead of the brands’ needs. – Niels Handberg, Director of UX, DigitasLBi Denmark
  14. 14. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 14 Product Videos Boost ROI, Intent To Purchase by Daisy Whitney, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Oh, video, what can’t you do? Every dawn brings a new report on video’s capabilities, it seems. Video can brand, it can drive ROI, it can boost purchases, it can scale tall buildings in a single bound. OK, all kidding aside, new data underscores the specific usefulness of product videos as a key element in a content marketing strategy. About 73% of consumers say they are more likely to purchase a product or service if they watch an informational video about it beforehand, according to Animoto, an online video creation app, that surveyed 1,000 consumers about video marketing. Animoto also found that nearly all consumers said videos were helpful in making purchase decisions, while 71% said videos made by businesses or brands delivered a positive impression. As more marketers embark on a path to content marketing, data like this can bolster their plans. In particular, video can play a useful role in driving e-commerce, since 93% of consumers said videos were helpful in comparison shopping, 87% said they were useful in researching products from the same brand, and another 93% said they can be valuable for post-purchase information. For brands that may be starting out with instructional videos, bear in mind that videos don’t need to be long. The ideal length is less than five minutes. And consumers are interested in a wide range of product videos: many want service demonstration videos, such as a 360-degree view of a product, as well as videos on how to play a game or use a phone. About 57% want videos about electronics, 39% about restaurants, 34% about travel and 33% about exercise and fitness. These findings align with other industry metrics, including those from video marketing firm Invodo, which has reported that 57% of consumers say they are more confident with their purchases after watching online video, and 52% of marketers say video is the content format that delivered the best ROI. Online video can also help seal a deal. Invodo has said that online shoppers who watch video are 1.81 times more likely to buy a product, and that two-thirds of video viewers watch 80% of a product video. The 'Internet of Things' Will Reshape Advertising Agencies by Justin Smith, Monday, Mar 24, 2014 The Beginning of Things There are two important drivers of the next evolution of the Internet, known as the Internet of Things. First, changes in consumer behavior and the broad adoption of mobile devices are dramatically changing how (and how much) people consume and create Internet content. Second is a massive proliferation of devices connected to the Internet. These include everything from smartphones, fitness wearables, and thermostats to cars. Where consumer behavior and connected devices intersect is the crux of the opportunity that exists for advertisers. To make sense of this intersection we must consider two key areas: the data created by connected devices and the design of services that use that data to create utility for consumers. The Biggest Data The backdrop of any discussion on the Internet of Things has to involve data. Not just the pile of photos and videos from your fancy new smartphone (which would be plenty on its own), but really Big Data. We’re talking about the constant chatter from a new ecosystem of connected devices that Cisco estimates will number 50 billion by the year 2020. These devices are busy quantifying
  15. 15. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 15 everything from the number of steps you take, to the average speed and fuel consumption of your vehicle, and everything else you could probably imagine in real-time. Having all this technology and data may seem like a great thing for an advertiser, but it's not so easy to act on it at the moment. For the reality of things, let’s imagine Jawbone captures data that you pumped out 50 dumbbell curls at the gym. They now know where and how long you were working out. As an advertiser this is a perfect trigger to hit that consumer with a communication for your workout recovery drink, but at the moment there's no media vehicle to deliver that communication, nor can you access the community of Jawbone devices readily. We still lack connectedness across devices that lead to the type of services and addressable audiences that would drive media dollars. The next great frontier in the Internet of Things squarely addresses this issue. Even though we’re adding billions of connected devices yearly, those devices are more or less coalescing around their own proprietary ecosystems. They are not yet open to third-party application developers or media companies. So at the moment, if you want to play in this space as an advertiser, you’ll need to invest in one-off partnerships or create your own connected device ecosystem. For the Internet of Things to truly take shape there must be a standard of interoperability between connected devices. For the reality of things, until the Nest Thermostat can talk to the U-Connect service in your car, we’re barely scratching the surface of what’s possible for advertisers. But advertisers will have to do much more than just use data to trigger a communication. Services Will Drive the Next Wave of Value The bar for an advertisement in the world of the Internet of Things will be much higher than it is today. Advertising will have to deliver a value to the consumer that matches (or exceeds) what the consumer’s context is worth to the advertiser. Who do you know who wants to have their workout interrupted by an ad to save money on a recovery shake? If you don’t think this is real, then take a look at the pushback content platforms are receiving on their attempts at native advertising. This means advertisers will have to stop making ads, and move toward designing services that create consumer value on behalf of their brands. The result will be designing for key moments of truth where consumer behaviors and connected devices intersect. Instead of trying to sell someone a recovery shake, try analyzing their data to provide them with information that will help optimize their workouts. The consumer will gladly trade this benefit for a recovery shake later. And this experience will do way more to bring the promise of the brand to life for the consumer. The End of Things To take full advantage of these opportunities, advertisers need to take stock of their ability to create and distribute compelling content for the Internet of Things, beginning with redefining what an advertisement is. We’ll need to think more like product designers and technologists by incorporating the user experience into the creative process to create brand narratives that can persist in the overlap between devices and human behavior. Disney-Dish's Ground-Breaking TV/Streaming Deal Disables AutoHop For ABC by Wayne Friedman, Mar 4, 2014, Wednesday, Mar 5, 2014 Dish Network and Walt Disney Co. have reached what the companies say is a ground-breaking TV carriage deal -- one that includes Dish disabling its controversial commercial-skipping technology, AutoHop, as well as Dish starting up an Internet-delivered TV service using Disney TV content.
  16. 16. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 16 The deal between the two companies -- which will dismiss all litigation between Disney and Dish -- “will disable AutoHop functionality for ABC content within the C3 ratings window.” With the AutoHop function -- part of the Dish’s Hopper set-top box -- viewers can skip massive amounts of TV commercials across the four major broadcast networks in prime time. C3 ratings, the average commercial ratings plus three days of time-shifted viewing, is the industry "currency," in which national TV advertisers contract viewership guaranteed deals with TV networks. In return, Dish Network gets what few, if any TV providers have received recently from big media content producers -- the right to stream linear and video on demand content from ABC-owned broadcast stations, ABC Family, Disney Channel, ESPN, and ESPN2 as part of an “over-the-top” Internet-delivered service. Dish customers can now access live and video on demand products, such as Disney apps including WatchESPN, WatchDisney, WatchABC Family, and WatchABC using Internet-enabled devices. Not only does the multiyear carriage TV deal include established TV platforms, such as the ABC Television Network, ABC owned-and-operated stations, ABC Family, Disney Channels, and ESPN, but the pact adds networks, such as Disney Junior, Fusion, Longhorn Network, ESPN3, and To-Be-Launched SEC ESPN Network. In addition, the deal provides a structure for “other advertising models,” including dynamic ad insertion, advertising on mobile devices and “extended advertising measurement periods.” “The creation of this agreement has really been about predicting the future of television with a visionary and forward-leaning partner,” stated Joseph P. Clayton, CEO and president of Dish Network. Anne Sweeney, co-chairman, Disney Media Networks, and president, Disney/ABC Television Group, added: “Not only were innovative business solutions reached on complicated current issues, we also planned for the evolution of our industry.” Programmatic TV Buying Frank Sinton | March 11, 2014 Over the last few years, the online and digital advertising industry has evolved at breakneck speed, with new innovations popping up almost faster than advertisers and agencies can keep up. Advancements such as real-time bidding, hyper-local targeting, cross-platform ad coordination, and much more - all based on the ability to track user data (both demographic and usage) and deliver ads accordingly - are now commonplace. The TV advertising market, meanwhile, has remained stagnant for the last 50 years. But in the last few weeks, signs are emerging that those dark ages may be nearing an end. Cox Media's recent decision to partner with a programmatic ad platform to sell its linear TV ad inventory marks a huge and much-needed step toward changing the TV ad landscape. Also notable is Comcast's move to buy streaming video ad firm FreeWheel, and Adap.tv's launch of its much-anticipated programmatic TV buying platform. Frankly, it's about time. The TV content delivery landscape has evolved to the point where digital advertising tactics could be applied if there was just the will do to so. Set-top boxes are Internet- connected and are capable of capturing the same type of data that Web-based networks can - think TV guide browsing data, viewing history, DVR settings, on-demand orders, etc. All of this can and is being tracked and stored, but not used for any advertising purposes. That will soon change, as the Cox deal shows. Content companies are using the data to create better user interfaces that drive customers toward more programming (see Comcast's new X1
  17. 17. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 17 platform, for instance). If this data can be used to create programming recommendations, certainly it can also be used to serve more targeted advertising as well. Imagine for instance four different households watching the same show - a family with two children, a single twenty-something male, a housewife, and an elderly couple - but each receiving different ads based on their personal demographic and viewing history. It happens every day online and on mobile or tablet devices, but the $70 billion TV advertising industry remains in the dark ages. These recent moves mentioned above are just the start of the coming sea-change. Other trends that will accelerate this evolution are the consolidation of the multi-system operators (Time Warner/Comcast anyone?) and the increasing competition they face from new media content companies like Netflix, Amazon, Apple, and Hulu. Once Google TV, the much-awaited Apple TV, and the next-generation gaming consoles start taking on a greater hold in the living room (and disrupting further both the ad and content delivery ecosystem), you can bet the behemoth incumbents will get motivated to make some changes. Of course, a few things need to happen before we get there. First, all this data needs to be aggregated and compartmentalized. It's true set-top boxes can collect data, but there's no consolidation of that data yet. Second, we need to determine just how to serve targeted ads via TV. The potential for distributing different ads to different people is there, but the process for doing so has yet to be built. And third, we need a process for noting user behavior across devices and formats. There's no single or standard login across TV, mobile, online, and tablet across multiple services. Some, like Apple TV, are trying to own that entire ecosystem through one user account, but viewers tend to use multiple services and formats. Bundled service offering is one possible solution, as is the use of third-party social networking accounts, or even profiling types of user behavior instead of the users themselves. Technology aside, there also needs to be a change in behavior. Advertising agencies need to break down their silos between old-media TV advertising and new-media advertising. They need to operate as one, interoperable, and coordinated unit. And there needs to be some cooperation between the different service providers as well. A while back, the Canoe effort brought six of the biggest cable operators together to create a unified standard for targeting and interactive advertising on TV. That effort failed in part because the competing services didn't work together. Ultimately, the goal should be to create one, unified, cross-platform media buy allowing ad campaigns to target users regardless of device used or format of ad delivered. It's a bold vision and one that will take some work to achieve. But everyone involved - brands, agencies, tech platforms, and of course the viewers themselves - all stand to gain if we can make it happen. 2014: Advertising industry to see massive disruptions Jan 1, 2014, 05.00AM By Bob Greenberg Founder, Chairman & CEO, R/GA (The advertising industry…) 1) Clients: New business models - The advertising industry will be massively disrupted by clients moving away from horizontal integration to embrace new business models that do not rely on the same amounts of mass advertising to drive growth. Instead, growth will be driven through a new form of innovation that is unique to the digital age (see #2 below) and relies on an entirely new set of marketing channels to drive awareness and purchase. However, in this new business model the purchase is just the beginning that connects consumers to an "ecosystem of value" and spurs further purchases, as Apple, Google and Amazon have all done with their ecosystems: get the same consumer to buy more things from the same brand. 2) Connected devices and the internet of things - Many of these new business models for clients will be based upon the integration of physical products with digital services. The marketing of them
  18. 18. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 18 will be "built in" to the device itself, as was the case with Nike+ Fuelband. Most consumers became aware of Fuelband through social sharing of data. Devices that collect data and share them through digital services will transform everyday life as well as the entire marketing industry. In 2013, R/GA launched an Accelerator at our New York headquarters in partnership with TechStars to invest in 10 startup companies in the connected devices spaces, exposing our clients to early-stage technology that can help drive their business growth. We will help the startups with everything from business strategy to design to technology to marketing and branding, while also gaining an ownership stake in each one. 3) Agencies as business transformation consultants - Agencies will transform into broad ranging companies that provide business transformation consulting, product innovation, technology innovation (development of digital services for brands), brand development and a myriad of production capabilities. The "agency" part of these new companies will just be a piece of the whole, not the entire business. Note that this trend is happening at the very same time when two of the largest holding companies have announced a merger to create an even larger holding company with the same exact kinds of assets. The merger just makes what already exists much bigger, rather than bringing new capabilities to the table. The distraction of this merger will create opportunities for new kinds of partners to gain traction with major clients. 4) Big Data = Earned data - Clients will increasingly "own" the data about their consumers, rather than relying upon third party, paid sources. They will "earn" the data from their consumers by providing digital services that deliver tremendous value by becoming personalised partners to consumers in everything from their finances to their health/fitness to what they cook for dinner at night to where they go on vacation to what clothes they wear, what make-up they use. In fact, the marketing world will soon be divided between those companies who have made investments in digital platforms in order to reap earned data, and those that have not. The ones earning the data will use this to inform everything from product development strategies to CRM programs to one-to-one marketing approaches that deliver relevant, actionable messages to consumers — again, at a massive cost savings relative to shotgun mass media approaches. 4) Sustainability and the future of business growth - Brands will need to tackle the sustainability issue head-on and demonstrate how they can continue to grow and innovate without contributing to climate change and natural resource depletion. Millennial consumers will simply stop doing business with brands that are not demonstrably "green." The Irresistible Power of Storytelling as a Strategic Business Tool by Harrison Monarth It’s not often that you hear Budweiser and Shakespeare mentioned in the same breath. But according to new research from Johns Hopkins University, the Bard’s deft application of storytelling techniques featured prominently in the beer company’s Super Bowl commercial. In “Puppy Love,” a perfectly adorable yellow lab becomes inseparable friends with a Clydesdale. Sneaking out of his pen, the pup and the horse “talk” in the stables and cavort on an idyllic farm – until someone comes to adopt the dog. The distressed puppy whines and places his paws against the window of the car set to take him to his new home. All seems lost until the Clydesdale rallies the other horses to stop the vehicle from leaving. Reunited, the two commence frolicking in the horse pasture and, we assume, live happily ever after. Forget the fact that Anheuser-Busch’s 60-second spot (which cost north of $4 million) aired close to the end of a lopsided championship game that was over before halftime. The Budweiser ad scored top honors in USA Today’s Ad Meter and Hulu’s Ad Zone for being the most popular
  19. 19. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 19 among viewers. How did it not get lost amid the tantalizing displays of shiny vehicles, CGI tricks, and David Beckham’s six pack? The irresistible power of classic storytelling. If Keith Quesenberry were a betting man, he would have cleaned up. The researcher at Johns Hopkins predicted that the Budweiser spot would be a winner after conducting a two-year analysis of 108 Super Bowl commercials. In a paper that will be published in the Fall 2014 issue of The Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, Quesenberry and research partner Michael Coolsen focused on brands’ use of specific strategies to sell products, such as featuring cute animals or sexy celebrities. But they also coded the commercials for plot development. They found that, regardless of the content of the ad, the structure of that content predicted its success. “People are attracted to stories,” Quesenberry tells me, “because we’re social creatures and we relate to other people.” It’s no surprise. We humans have been communicating through stories for upwards of 20,000 years, back when our flat screens were cave walls. “Especially in the Super Bowl, those 30-second ads are almost like mini movies,” he says. Quesenberry found that the ads that told a more complete story using Freytag’s Pyramid — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dramatic_structure a dramatic structure that can be traced back to Aristotle — were the most popular. Shakespeare had mastered this structure, arranging his plays in five acts to include an exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and a dénouement—or final outcome. The “Best Buds” story also uses these elements to great effect. The more of the acts each version of the ad had, the better it performed. Storytelling evokes a strong neurological response. Neuroeconomist Paul Zak’s research indicates that our brains produce the stress hormone cortisol during the tense moments in a story, which
  20. 20. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 20 allows us to focus, while the cute factor of the animals releases oxytocin, the feel-good chemical that promotes connection and empathy. Other neurological research tells us that a happy ending to a story triggers the limbic system, our brain’s reward center, to release dopamine which makes us feel more hopeful and optimistic. In one experiment after participants watched an emotionally charged movie about a father and son, Zak asked study participants to donate money to a stranger. With both oxytocin and cortisol in play, those who had the higher amounts of oxytocin were much more likely to give money to someone they’d never met. The implications for advertisers, who’d also like to part people from their money, are clear. But advertisers aren’t the only ones tapping into the trust-inducing power of storytelling. Strategic storytelling has also been enlisted to change attitudes and behaviors. Two studies from the health care industry show its power: Penn State College of Medicine researchers found that medical students ’ attitudes about dementia patients, who are perceived as difficult to treat, improved substantially after students participated in storytelling exercises that made them more sympathetic to their patients’ conditions. And a University of Massachusetts Medical School study found that a storytelling approach has also been effective in convincing populations at risk for hypertension to change their behavior and reduce their blood pressure. The most successful storytellers often focus listeners’ minds on a single important idea and they take no longer than a 30-second Superbowl spot to forge an emotional connection. Widely recognized as the leading trial lawyer of his time, Moe Levine often used the “whole man” theory to successfully influence juries to empathize with his clients. Seeking compensation for a client who had lost both arms in an accident, Levine surprised the court and jury, who were accustomed to long closing arguments, by painting a brief and emotionally devastating picture instead: As you know, about an hour ago we broke for lunch. I saw the bailiff come and take you all as a group to have lunch in the jury room. Then I saw the defense attorney, Mr. Horowitz. He and his client decided to go to lunch together. The judge and court clerk went to lunch. So, I turned to my client, Harold, and said “Why don’t you and I go to lunch together?” We went across the street to that little restaurant and had lunch. (Significant pause.) Ladies and gentlemen, I just had lunch with my client. He has no arms. He has to eat like a dog. Thank you very much. Levine reportedly won one of the largest settlements in the history of the state of New York. Storytelling may seem like an old-fashioned tool, today — and it is. That’s exactly what makes it so powerful. Life happens in the narratives we tell one another. A story can go where quantitative analysis is denied admission: our hearts. Data can persuade people, but it doesn’t inspire them to act; to do that, you need to wrap your vision in a story that fires the imagination and stirs the soul. GfK Strikes Deal With Big 3 DMPs, Offers Key MRI Segments For Online Targeting by Joe Mandese, Tuesday, Apr 1, 2014 Media audience researcher GfK MRI has struck deals with three of the online industry’s biggest data management platforms (DMP) -- BlueKai, eXelate and Lotame -- enabling their customers to target 44 unique consumer segments, including one targeting people who say they are willing to receive ads in exchange for services or lower costs. MRI historically has been used mainly by advertisers and agencies planning print media buys such as consumer magazines, or as part of multimedia campaign strategies, but the deal with the DMPs
  21. 21. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 21 will enable them to plan and target online users with key MRI audience segments, including their offline attitudes and self-reported behaviors. The segments are culled from MRI’s Survey of the American Consumer, a highly regarded single- source database used for U.S. media planning. Updated each year from more than 25,000 in- person interviews with adults, the survey provides insights into consumer demographics, media choices, attitudes and lifestyles, along with consumption of approximately 6,000 products in 550 categories. Among the other unique segments available to the DMP customers are: * “Purchase Researchers,” people who research electronic products before purchasing. * “Use Mobile Phone for Entertainment,” people who view their phones as a source of entertainment. * “Internet Banking,” people willing to use the Internet for daily banking transactions. * “Prefer Local and Nutritious Foods,” people who evaluate nutrition information at restaurants and prefer to buy foods grown locally. The Next Gen Apps Will Be All About You, But Will the Value of Highly Personalized Experiences Trump Privacy Concerns? By Scott Gillum. Published on April 01, 2014 Ad Age Digital Conference 2014 The Ad Age Digital Conference brings together 500 CMOs, agency leaders, media executives, venture capitalists, and startup founders with one agenda in mind: pushing the art and science of advertising and marketing into the future. Learn more I had a dream last night that I was hiking along a stream with my family. It was the same path we'd hiked and geocached dozens of times. Except this time, Siri's voice interrupted our hike and asked if we'd like to play a game. An app appeared on my phone, and using GPS, our hiking history and topographical maps of the area, it had created a real-time obstacle course, complete with a map, times to achieve and "land mine" rocks to avoid. The app had proactively invaded our routine hike by creating a totally new experience. When I awoke, I wondered if I had read about such an app, or if it was truly a dream. Concluding that it was indeed a dream, I knew the article that had inspired it. Earlier in the week, I had read about fitness apps that are personalized using individual goals and GPS technology. Next-generation smart apps have the potential to become an active part of our lives. By tracking and understanding our unique behaviors and habits, developers will be able to create apps that offer highly personalized recommendations and experiences. By 2017, Gartner predicts we are going to download mobile apps more than 268 billion times, and mobile users are likely to provide personalized data streams to more than 100 apps and services daily. Our mobile devices, which many of us carry 24/7, can track where we've been, what we've done and when we did it. They can listen in on our conversations and access data we have stored on the device -- and in the cloud. As a result, be on the watch for the following trends in the near future:
  22. 22. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 22 The emergence of "small data." The value and functionality of your mobile device will shift from connectivity to data capture and transfer. In a sense, your phone will act as your own "black box," recording your daily activity, similar to a flight recorder. A listening mode on your phone. This feature will add a layer of richness to the data that is already being collected by third parties and enable apps to intervene with information, recommendations, etc. Highly personalized experiences. Apps will leverage multiple sources of data and, with artificial intelligence, begin to create experiences and recommendations in real time, much of it designed around our daily lives and routines. 4 Lessons on Brand Storytelling from Ad Age's Digital Conference By Dawn Papandrea, NewsCred Contributor NewsCred Blog | April 02, 2014 What’s a content marketer doing keynoting an advertising conference? Believe it or not, there is more overlap than you’d think! Held at Manhattan’s Pier 36, Ad Age’s Digital Conference hosted digital visionaries like General Mill’s Mark Addicks, E*Trade’s Liza Landsman, and celebrity restaurateur Mario Batali, who shared their thoughts on digital advertising innovation. Closing out the first day of the conference, NewsCred CEO Shafqat Islam shared his vision on content marketing and touched on many of the messages relayed throughout the course of the day’s panels and speakers -- brands need to find new ways to grab their audience’s attention, and more important, engage and nurture relationships with them. It’s all about trust: 78 percent of consumers believe brands providing content are interested in building good relationships. Brand storytelling does just that. Here’s a recap of NewsCred’s four ways to make brand storytelling – or content marketing – work for your brand: 1. Be authentic. Authenticity is the key to great storytelling. Only by being forthright can you earn the trust of the consumer, and you need to keep repaying them for their trust every day. Today’s consumers are savvy, and they can spot a sales pitch a mile away. That’s why it’s important to win their hearts and minds by telling the story of your brand’s bigger purpose. 2. Reach audiences where they are. Forget about the notion of “if you build it, they will come.” You have to seek your audience out where they live, whether it’s on social media, via email, or where they get their news. Content marketing is the connective thread that weaves together all of your marketing efforts, from social, to email marketing, to blogs. 3. If you’re going to try real time marketing, get it right. There have probably been more stumbles than triumphs when it comes to real time marketing efforts, and that’s because it’s complex. There’s no time to plan, and there’s no telling how the audience at large might react to something. However, brands can make a conscious effort to make real time marketing work for them by starting with quality content; implementing simple processes; and having the technology to help you manage it all. 4. Marketers have the power. More so than ever before, the marketing team is responsible for a large part of business growth. Consider this stat shared by Islam: Anywhere from 66 to 90 percent of the buyer’s journey is complete before a salesperson even gets in touch. Communicating with buyers every step of the way is vital, or they’ll take their attention and interest to your competitors. The big takeaway? Content marketing generates approximately three times as many leads as traditional marketing. It all comes down to the metrics, after all, which is why brands might want to walk away from the hard sell, and see the softer, more effective side of content marketing.
  23. 23. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 23 How to Convert a Curious Researcher into a Paying Customer Posted March 21, 2014 We all know at any one point in time, there are millions of people searching, learning and sharing content online. When prospects are in this ‘early discovery’ phase, their minds are at their most open to connecting and receiving guidance from industry influencers like you! Here is a sure-fire strategy to catch these curious researchers at the perfect time, bring them into your network of influence, and mould them into prospects that are ready to buy. Social Media Marketing The great thing about Social Marketing is that you can attract the interested crowd before they even realise they’re interested! Here are three tips to help you leverage social media to draw in the curious crowd: Tip 1 – Right message, right platform, right time Consider your target market, and the best platform to engage them. Content is king, and context in queen. So make sure you’re putting the right message in front of the right people, on the right platform, at the right time (whoa that’s a lot of things to get right. But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered). Mindset is everything, when people are hanging out on platforms like Facebook and Twitter, they are typically in a ‘nostalgic’ mindset, looking back on photos, discussing events and news with their friends and families. This is great news for B2C companies looking to attract curious researchers investigating their lifestyle related product purchases (think kitchens, holidays, events, beauty products/services, cars). When prospects are viewing content on platforms like LinkedIn, they are in a professional mindset, that’s why businesses that operate in the B2B space typically enjoy a better result from their content marketing efforts there. Tip 2 – Take control of the conversation by taking them off social media It’s great to get your micro message in front of your prospects, but in most cases a micro message, means a micro influence. Use your Twitter! Update or post as bait to get the curious researcher across from social media, to your website. In order for a prospect to get the real answers they need, they know they’re going to need to veer away from the security of social media at some stage anyway. The key is to not try and answer their question in 140 characters or less, but instead demonstrate that you understand the problem they face and then let their curious nature do the rest. Tip 3 – Sharing is caring If you haven’t had a major focus on getting your blog content shared on social media before, I’m about to rock your world. It’s a pretty simple concept to get your head around, people usually like (or hate, but let’s not worry about that one today) people that are similar to them, these similarities include:
  24. 24. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 24 The industries they work in (I have a disturbing percentage of friends involved in the digital/tech/advertising space, are you the same?). Their life stage/age/marital status Their spending habits/disposable incomes Goals and aspirations All of these attributes can influence what solutions a consumer may seek online, whether for personal or business reasons. If you can get half the job done by getting a curious researcher to your site, the battle is already half won as long as they influence someone on the quest for information. Having a really well thought out social sharing strategy for your content will help you spread your influence by getting those curious researchers reading more of your content, and going into the top of your sales funnel. Search Engines Being found on Google these days largely comes down to producing great content that addresses specific questions that people are asking, and does it well. Here are is the best way to attract curious researchers to your website and content via the search engines: Tip 1 – Be genuinely helpful There is nothing that brings a tear to my eye quicker than a company spending pointless hours pumping out low quality content that isn’t targeting searchers in the right stage of the buying cycle. Content needs to be developed in a way that addresses specific questions and problems that your consumer is facing at the very start of their journey, before they have engaged a company to help them out (when it can often be too late). Please, for my sake and yours, don’t try to sell anything when your gentle, curious prospects who are just looking for a little bit of free guidance, begin searching for content online. Ask yourself, what would I tell my mother if she was thinking about looking into purchasing (insert your product/service here) for the first time. Tip 2 – Connect your content to your Google+ account Google wants to deliver its users great content, we all know that, and as you’ve probably read, Google+ Authorship is their way of differentiating between industry experts and industry duds. If you’re writing content and looking to get it found in the search engines, a great way to make searchers click on your content over someone else’s is to have you Google+ profile connected, this is down to two reasons: The more high quality content you write, the more influence Google will deem you to have in your industry which will in turn move you higher up the search engine rankings for your targeted topics. Your image will appear next to your blog post, this significantly improves your CTR (click through rate), giving you a nice little boost in traffic to each blog post you write. Tip 3 – Make your article address a specific problem
  25. 25. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 25 Skimming over lots of different topics in a single blog post, is a sure fire way to get ignored by the search engines. Articles that have 1500+ words almost always outperform more shallow explanations on the same topic. Google loves in-depth, detailed explanations on very specific topics that address exactly what the consumer is searching for. It’s good news for Google because they are providing their searchers with exactly what they’re after and it’s good for you because you are educating/influencing prospective consumers entering your market. Guest Blogging Guest blogging is a great way to get your content in front of a ready-made audience of prospects. Here are three tips to should consider when approaching websites requesting a guest blogging opportunity. Guest-Posting Tip 1 – Relevance There are a number of reasons I have listed this as the first thing to think about when guest blogging, if there is no relevance, there is no point. Even if there is a large audience, if they are not interested in what you’re writing about, are in the wrong stage of the buying cycle, or can simply not use the information you’re supplying them with, there is simply no point. From an SEO perspective, if the website you’re blogging for isn’t relevant to your niche, the additional authority gained from the link is going to be limited. Here is a mini checklist to make sure you’re on point with your outreach: Are these customers in an area I can service? Do they have the right level of knowledge for the article I’m writing? What stage of the buying cycle are these consumers in? What is the ideal outcome of me writing this blog post? Is it worth it? Simple stuff, but often overlooked. Take your time to find a guest blogging opportunity that is the fit for you and your content so you can make best of use of your efforts, the readers time (if you get through) and the editors time. Tip 2 – Website Traffic Levels There are so many articles you can produce in a given time period, so you need to ensure that the level of traffic is going to be worth the time it takes to write the article, simply put, is the juice worth the squeeze? There are tools out there that claim to uncover traffic levels, in my experience I’ve found these to be notoriously unreliable, and more trouble than they’re worth. Generally speaking, page rank and social media interaction is a good indicator of traffic levels. I use the Page Rank Tracker Google Chrome plugin when skimming over different sites to approach and it seems to work pretty well. Tip 3 – Other Factors
  26. 26. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 26 There are a few other things to consider but are sometimes harder to gauge. Here is a guide to some other important factors to consider when selecting which blogs to approach. Social Media Network Check to see if these sites have a strong social media following and whether they regularly share their content to their network. This could mean thousands of extra prospects view your content. Subscriber List This one can be a little harder to work out, unless of course the site is promoting their high subscriber number to assist them in continuing to grow their list. Page Rank A higher page rank will generally give you a bigger boost in the search engines. Use one of the many free page rank checker tools, here is the one that we use: http://www.prchecker.info/check_page_rank.php Repeat Posts It is better for your SEO to have a couple of posts on a wide range of different websites, rather than having lots of links all coming from one. If you’ve been blogging a lot on one website, try to mix it up a little. Summary I had a lot of fun writing this article. It reminded me why it is that I love digital marketing so much. It is now better for your business than ever before, to be helpful, engaging and have personality! Why (and how) programmatic works at Kimberly-Clark Authors: Geoffrey Precourt, Source: Event Reports: ANA Media Leadership, March 2014 Summary This event report discusses how Kimberly-Clark first explored programmatic advertising. As a means of securing buy-in to this approach, especially from the firm's procurement department, the emphasis was initially placed on the cost savings it promised to deliver. The other main benefits included: achieving greater efficiency; optimizing messaging in almost real time; increasing viewability; and minimizing check fraud. However, brands must be willing to make an upfront investment – in terms resources, but especially in terms of time – to get the best out of this activity. Owning the data used and generated is also essential if marketers are to monitor progress in a thoroughgoing way. Article "Two-and-a-half years ago, Kimberly-Clark made the conscious decision to learn about programmatic buying." And that choice came with two conditions, according to Mark Kaline, the firm's global director/media, licensing and consumer services: "We had to be a little comfortable with being uncomfortable. "We were going to fail, we were going to do things wrong – but we were going to learn as we go." "We decided to jump in with both feet," he continued. "We saw on the other side of the fence." And, in spite of taking what was termed a "ready–fire–aim" approach, Kaline insisted that the trip was "well worth the journey."
  27. 27. Babelfish Articles Dec 2013 – Apr 2014 21-04-14 Page 27 In the closing session of the Association of National Advertisers' (ANA) 2014 Media Leadership Conference, Kaline allowed that achieving "efficiencies" initially constituted the main appeal of pursuing a programmatic strategy. "They're kind of the Trojan Horse that gets you by the gates of procurement," he said. And, in fact, "We started off with a good story relative to cost savings, and with a bottomless supply of inventory out there in the digital world." But, in addition to efficiencies, there was the allure of "optimization – something that we saw as a value." The concept of operating "in as real time as you get" also offered the immediate prospect of "driving better cost-per-action … whether that's requesting a sample or a coupon or actually a buy- now." For Kimberly-Clark, it thus held out the promise of "tremendous" results on a number of measures. The 142-year-old organization has its roots in the American Midwest. And, at least partly because of that, Kaline allowed, it is sometimes "a very conservative company." It was thus noted internally that "real time" can mean very real risks, especially in a universe where placements are driven by automation. "You have to really watch where your brand shows up, because it can be attacked really very quickly if you end up in the wrong place at the wrong time." But, Kaline reported to the ANA delegates, the company – which makes brands like Kleenex facial tissues and Kotex feminine-hygiene products, as well as Cottonelle, Scott, and Andrex toilet papers – "found in the course of this two-year journey that programmatic has been a very effective marketing tool" for several reasons. These reasons, according to Kaline, include the following: "It leverages the bottomless supply of online/mobile inventory to drive efficiencies." "It offers the opportunity for optimization in near real time to drive more effective cost-per-action metrics." "It can increase viewability results." "It can provide a higher degree of protection to ensure brand safety and minimize check fraud." With that knowledge in hand, Kimberly-Clark and Kaline pulled together a set of four priorities that would guide its next set of programmatic experiences. 1) Transparency According to Kaline, programmatic demands upfront investments "in the cost of the technology, in the visibility of the rates we pay to our publishers, in the control of the agency FTE and margins to the people who partner with us and work on this, and the auditability of our contracts." 2) Data capture for optimization Kaline told the Media Leadership delegates, "One of our priorities – and there's no simpler way to say this – is that owning the data is very important." He cited two reasons for this: "We're able to see our clients not just run [ads], but actually learn as they go. "You can see the cost-per-action dropping as the buy runs." The result: "We're able to use our learning to fuel and kick-start new products. It's not something that's just 'one and done.' You nurture and sustain that learning by owning the data."

×