How does the co-operative instinct emerge in low-income communities?<br />Anne Power<br />
A little personal history <br />Tanzania, US, Holloway<br />Defining co-operation<br />Pooling resources to maximise share...
Human survival depends on co-operation <br /><ul><li>Evidence from pre-historic times
We have moved far into complex, competitive, unequal groups
So are co-operative models relevant today?</li></li></ul><li>Pre-historic co-operation<br />
Bottom-up, member controlled, small scale<br />Multiple models emerge in:<br /><ul><li>Complex modern economies with ‘big ...
Advanced fast changing urban communities
Sophisticated private and public services
Industrial, agricultural service systems
Financial, construction, professions, care.</li></li></ul><li>Danish co-operatives<br />
Danish Co-operatives<br />
Root – Industrial revolution ‘shocks’<br /><ul><li>Labour > wealth > shared unequally
Powerlessness among masses
Individuals at bottom group together
Urgency of survival
social protection, distribution of benefits, solidarity.
Higher-level structures to tackle collective conditions</li></li></ul><li>
Spawns ‘bottom-up’ groupings<br /><ul><li>Associations and clubs
Friendly societies
Mutual aid and self-help groups
Co-operative producers, builders, retail
Proliferation of co-operative experiments
Rochdale Pioneers galvanised movement
Leading to ‘bottom-up’ ideas and bodies
Spread world-wide from UK</li></li></ul><li>
Alongside powerful social movements creating<br /><ul><li>Public health bodies
Local government
Evangelical ‘chapels’
Trade unions
‘One man one vote’
Women’s suffrage
Civil rights
Leading to ‘top-down’ systems</li></li></ul><li>
Co-operation advances human condition along many lines<br />Pure ‘survival goods’ through collective savings e.g. food<br ...
Martin Luther King, Jr. and the US Civil Rights Movement<br />
Powerful ‘niche organisations’ work alongside government<br />Health and social care – Italy, Belgium<br />Housing – Spain...
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Anne power the cooperative instinct

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How does the co-operative instinct emerge in low-income communities?

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Transcript of "Anne power the cooperative instinct"

  1. 1. How does the co-operative instinct emerge in low-income communities?<br />Anne Power<br />
  2. 2. A little personal history <br />Tanzania, US, Holloway<br />Defining co-operation<br />Pooling resources to maximise shared gains<br />Solidarity and reciprocity<br />
  3. 3. Human survival depends on co-operation <br /><ul><li>Evidence from pre-historic times
  4. 4. We have moved far into complex, competitive, unequal groups
  5. 5. So are co-operative models relevant today?</li></li></ul><li>Pre-historic co-operation<br />
  6. 6.
  7. 7. Bottom-up, member controlled, small scale<br />Multiple models emerge in:<br /><ul><li>Complex modern economies with ‘big government’
  8. 8. Advanced fast changing urban communities
  9. 9. Sophisticated private and public services
  10. 10. Industrial, agricultural service systems
  11. 11. Financial, construction, professions, care.</li></li></ul><li>Danish co-operatives<br />
  12. 12. Danish Co-operatives<br />
  13. 13.
  14. 14. Root – Industrial revolution ‘shocks’<br /><ul><li>Labour > wealth > shared unequally
  15. 15. Powerlessness among masses
  16. 16. Individuals at bottom group together
  17. 17. Urgency of survival
  18. 18. social protection, distribution of benefits, solidarity.
  19. 19. Higher-level structures to tackle collective conditions</li></li></ul><li>
  20. 20.
  21. 21. Spawns ‘bottom-up’ groupings<br /><ul><li>Associations and clubs
  22. 22. Friendly societies
  23. 23. Mutual aid and self-help groups
  24. 24. Co-operative producers, builders, retail
  25. 25. Proliferation of co-operative experiments
  26. 26. Rochdale Pioneers galvanised movement
  27. 27. Leading to ‘bottom-up’ ideas and bodies
  28. 28. Spread world-wide from UK</li></li></ul><li>
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Alongside powerful social movements creating<br /><ul><li>Public health bodies
  31. 31. Local government
  32. 32. Evangelical ‘chapels’
  33. 33. Trade unions
  34. 34. ‘One man one vote’
  35. 35. Women’s suffrage
  36. 36. Civil rights
  37. 37. Leading to ‘top-down’ systems</li></li></ul><li>
  38. 38. Co-operation advances human condition along many lines<br />Pure ‘survival goods’ through collective savings e.g. food<br />Sanitary homes at reduced cost through collective building organisations (Spain, Scandinavia)<br />Health, unemployment, death insurance (Italy)<br />Education, learning (Denmark)<br />Democracy, participation, voice (US Civil Rights)<br />Savings investment for individuals and common good<br />
  39. 39.
  40. 40. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the US Civil Rights Movement<br />
  41. 41. Powerful ‘niche organisations’ work alongside government<br />Health and social care – Italy, Belgium<br />Housing – Spain, Scandinavia<br />Retail – Britain, France, Spain<br />Industrial production – Spain (Basque)<br />Architecture and engineering – UK (Arup)<br />Fisheries (Japan, West Africa)<br />Savings and insurance – worldwide<br />
  42. 42.
  43. 43.
  44. 44. Core principles of co-operation<br />Open membership<br />Democratic control – one member one vote<br />Distribution of surplus value<br />Limited interest on capital<br />Political and religious neutrality<br />Promotion of education<br />(no credit – cash trading only)<br />
  45. 45. Open Membership<br />One man<br />One vote<br />
  46. 46. Shared surplus<br />The ‘divi’<br />
  47. 47. Pure good<br />No debt<br />
  48. 48. Education<br />
  49. 49. Conditions of success - inspiration<br /><ul><li>Pressing, visible problems and acute need
  50. 50. Common cause and unifying idea
  51. 51. Clear targets for action
  52. 52. Small early steps
  53. 53. Trust – clear mutual benefits
  54. 54. Elements of self-interest, reciprocity
  55. 55. Shared gains</li></li></ul><li>Vision – Mondragon<br />
  56. 56. Conditions of success - organisation<br />Leadership from within<br />Organising skills and business development<br />Ideas and access brokers<br />Ideas and action planning<br />Financial controls and probity<br />Ground rules – mediating, resolving conflict<br />Transparency<br />
  57. 57. Organisation<br />
  58. 58. Co-op Group Booming<br />
  59. 59. Co-operative organisations today<br /><ul><li>Tenant co-operative and tenant management organisations
  60. 60. Play-schemes, Nurseries
  61. 61. Employee owned services - Locke Fyne Oyster Co & John Lewis
  62. 62. Rapid expansion of Co-op Group since financial crisis
  63. 63. Mondragon industrial co-operatives</li></li></ul><li>Deprived Council estates– unlikely co-operative enterprises<br /><ul><li>Public landlord problems
  64. 64. Steady revenue stream in rents
  65. 65. Consultation or control
  66. 66. Local knowledge and commitment prevails
  67. 67. Local management and local budgets
  68. 68. Local management saves money and creates jobs
  69. 69. Hands-on learnable skills and training</li></li></ul><li>Tenant Management Organisations<br />
  70. 70. Outcomes<br />Higher tenant satisfaction<br />Higher quality service<br />Managing within budget<br />Conserving resource<br />Better environments<br />Higher rewards for effort<br />Mutual gains<br />
  71. 71. Community Fund<br />
  72. 72. Lessons for government<br />Complex public framework of support systems<br />More essential - remote, complex systems<br />Community instincts useful and strong <br />But need to BROKER community self interest<br />Therefore supporting framework<br />Distribution of resources<br />Training and ‘hand-holding’<br />
  73. 73. Lessons for local authorities<br /><ul><li>Mutuals can deliver key services
  74. 74. Profit sharing
  75. 75. Front line v. bureaucratic jobs
  76. 76. New ways of creating social progress
  77. 77. Community energy services
  78. 78. Participatory budgeting
  79. 79. Sustaining motivation
  80. 80. Looking to Europe</li></li></ul><li>Inspired by example<br />
  81. 81. Social care-taking in Torino<br />
  82. 82. Saving birds’ nests<br />King Penguins<br />
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