AFTA Half-Century Summit - Must reads

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AFTA Half-Century Summit - Must reads

  1. 1. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 American
For
The
Arts
Half­Century
Summit
 
 Making
Big
Things
Happen
 MUST
READS
 
 
 

  2. 2. 
 
 
 Must­Reads
 
 We
have
three
goals
for
this
event:
 
 1.
Re­frame
the
way
you
think
about
using
the
internet
and
technology
to
 communicate,
engage,
educate,
and
mobilize
audiences
in
relation
to
film
and
 television.

We
wanted
to
make
sure
you
understood
the
need
to
re‐consider,
and
in
some
 cases
re‐set,
everything
you
are
doing
because
of
the
influence
that
these
new
tools
are
 having
on
society
–
and
particularly
in
the
context
of
arts,
culture,
nonprofits
and
serious
 issues.


 
 2.
Address
the
fears
that
most
organizations
have
about
social
media
‐‐
the
loss
of
 control,
the
costs
and
ability
to
measure
impact,
the
burden
of
management,
the
challenge
 of
getting
buy‐in
from
senior
management
who
aren't
intimately
familiar
with
the
latest
 innovations
online,
and
of
course
the
disconnect
between
you
and
the
audience
you
are
 serving.

Instead
of
living
in
fear,
our
hope
was
to
show
all
the
opportunities
that
exist,
that
 technology
is
not
scary,
and
that
the
opportunities
to
reach,
engage,
educate,
and
ultimately
 mobilize
audiences
around
your
issues
and
groups.

 
 3.
Share
some
specific
examples
and
put
some
'next
practices'
together
that
anyone
 could
begin
to
apply
to
their
work
almost
immediately.
 
 With
that
third
goal
in
mind,
the
participants
have
put
together
a
‘must‐read’
list
of
items
to
help
 you
think
more
about
these
exciting
times.

Please
note:
A
must‐read
could
be
an
article
or
a
book,
 a
movie,
television
show,
podcast,
or
even
an
event
–
the
format
isn’t
important.

What
matters
is
 that
a
‘must
read’
is
something
that
is
relevant,
timely,
compelling,
interesting,
fun,
or
just
worth
 thinking
about.

 
 Happy
must‐reading.
 
 

  3. 3. 
 
 
 Submitted
by
Brian
Reich
 
 MY
BOOK:
When
I
wrote
my
book,
Media
Rules!:
Mastering
Today’s
Technology
to
Connect
 with
and
Keep
Your
Audience,
I
set
out
to
address
this
challenge
faced
by
organizations
and
help
 shape
the
ways
organizations
can
communicate
with
their
audience,
in
the
face
of
rapid
 innovation
in
technology
and
the
massive
social
change
we
are
currently
(and
it
seems
constantly)
 experiencing.

The
book
offers
a
roadmap
for
helping
organizations
to
understand
what
the
 audience
expects
and
how
to
use
technology
to
meet
those
expectations.
More
than
that,
however,
 it
highlights
the
other
things
that
you
need
to
take
into
account
‐
how
you
staff
and
manage
your
 team,
how
you
support
your
partners,
how
customer
service
has
changed,
and
similar
‐‐
which
are
 important
to
consider
because
executing
on
an
effective
new
media
strategy,
whether
it
is
online
 community
based
or
something
else,
requires
buy‐in
from
all
levels
and
close
coordination
among
 all
the
different
elements
of
your
organization.
 
 ARTICLES,
ETC:
There
are
literally
hundreds
of
articles,
reports
and
blog
posts
that
offer
 interesting
insights
into
the
opportunities
that
exist
for
using
new
and
emerging
technologies
to
 support
your
work,
and
your
communications.

I
try
to
look
for
articles
that
are
not
specific
to
one
 subject,
so
that
you
can
take
lessons
and
ideas
from
other
sectors
and
apply
them
to
your
work.
 
So
that
is
what
I
have
tried
to
do
here
‐‐
below
is
a
list
articles
(some
more
recent
than
others)
 that
I
have
found
particularly
interesting
and
useful:
 
 ‐
Chris
Anderson,
the
editor
of
Wired
magazine
and
the
author
of
The
Long
Tail
(the
book
 that
singlehandedly
changed
the
face
of
eCommerce
forever),
wrote
a
second,
game‐ changing
book,
Free.

I
recommend
the
book,
but
if
you
aren’t
sure,
he
previewed
subject
in
 a
cover
story
for
Wired
Magazine,
also
conveniently
titled
"Free."

"Free"
is
important,
 because
it
speaks
to
how
to
get
audiences
to
pursue
more
information
(and
if
you
need
to
 monetize
or
measure
in
the
process,
how
to
do
that).

Here
is
the
link:
 http://www.wired.com/techbiz/it/magazine/16‐03/ff_free
 
 ‐
McKinsey
Quarterly
published
an
article
almost
two
years
ago
now
that
highlighted
8
 trends
relating
to
the
future
of
communications.

Every
single
point
in
this
article
is
 relevant
to
the
work
that
you
do
‐
maybe
not
today,
but
certainly
in
the
near
future.
Here
is
 the
link:

 http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Information_Technology/Applications/Eight_busines s_technology_trends_to_watch_2080
 
 ‐
President
Obama's
campaign
continues
to
be
a
constant
reference
point
for
anyone
 thinking
about,
or
trying
to
find
ways
to
use
technology
and
the
internet
to
engage
and
 mobilize
a
community
online.
There
are
elements
of
what
the
Obama
campaign
did
that
are
 applicable
to
this
discussion
and
represents
the
way
many
organizations
are
going
to
have
 to
operate
in
the
near
future
if
they
want
to
be
successful.

Here
are
some
links
to
articles
 that
I
think
do
a
good
job
explaining
what
the
Obama
campaign
did
and
why
it
mattered.

 
 
 

  4. 4. 
 
 
 How
the
internet
Put
Barack
Obama
In
The
White
House
 http://www.techpresident.com/blog/entry/32998/how_the_internet_put_barack_o bama_in_the_white_house
 
 How
Obama
Killed
Election
Day
and
Became
The
Next
President
 http://adage.com/campaigntrail/post?article_id=132250
 
 Campaigns
in
A
Web
2.0
World
 http://nytimes.com/?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1225723617‐Jeqsi9NaV38WR372YEubCg
 
 Propelled
by
the
Internet,
Barack
Obama
Wins
 http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/11/propelled‐by‐in.html
 
 Two
quick
notes:

First,
I
believe
much
of
the
analysis
you
will
find
in
the
media
of
his
 campaign's
use
of
technology
to
build
and
support
his
community
is
flawed
­­
the
press
has
 written
that
his
building
of
his
own
social
network,
using
text
messaging,
or
posting
videos
on
 YouTube
were
the
key
to
his
success.

But,
as
we
know,
it
goes
much
deeper
than
that.

Second,
 the
campaign
was
extremely
successful,
but
suggestions
that
the
campaign
radically
changed
 politics
are
overstated.

What
President
Obama
and
his
team
did
was
run
a
traditional
 political
campaign
more
efficiently
and
effectively
than
any
before
(and
who
knows,
maybe
 any
ever)
­­
and
technology
was
a
prime
reason
for
that.


 
 Second,
if
you
have
truly
dynamic
educational
opportunities,
technology
will
allow
you
to
 scale
you
operation
and
reach
new
potential
audiences
more
effectively
than
ever
before.
 However,
if
President
Obama
had
not
had
the
right
message,
great
timing,
a
supportive
 political
environment
and
similar
the
technology
would
have
had
little
impact.

Without
that
 core
to
fuel
your
efforts,
you
will
fail
(just
as
the
Obama
campaign
would
have
if
they
did
not
 have
the
best
campaign
strategy
for
the
time).
 
 
 BOOK
ORGY:
If
you
are
looking
to
fill
your
bookshelf
with
some
key
reading
that
will
help
you
 understand
the
broad
social
theories
driving
changes
online,
and
the
increase
in
the
community‐ driven
nature
of
communications,
consider
reading
these:
 
 ‐
The
Long
Tail
by
Chris
Anderson
 ‐
Everything
is
Miscellaneous
by
David
Weinberger
 ‐
Here
Comes
Everybody
by
Clay
Shirky
 ‐
Groundswell
by
Charlene
Li
and
Josh
Bernoff
 ‐
Open
Leadership
by
Charlene
Li
 ‐
A
Whole
New
Mind
by
Daniel
Pink
 ‐
Drive:
The
Surprising
Truth
About
What
Motivates
Us
by
Daniel
Pink
 ‐
What
Would
Google
Do?
By
Jeff
Jarvis
 ‐
Socialnomics
by
Erik
Qualman
 ‐
Microtrends
by
Mark
Penn
 ‐
Born
Digital
by
John
Palfrey
and
Urs
Gasser
 

  5. 5. 
 
 ‐
Growing
Up
Digital
by
Don
Tapscott
 ‐
Snoop:
What
Your
Stuff
Says
About
You
by
Sam
Gosling
 ‐
Predictably
Irrational
by
Dan
Ariely
 ‐
The
Chaos
Scenario
by
Bob
Garfield
 
 NON­BOOKS:
And
here
are
a
few
links
to
other
resources
that
offer
new
stats
and
new
insights
on
 how
everything
is
changing.
 
 Razorfish
FEED
Study
 http://feed.razorfish.com/
 
 Pew
Internet
Report:
The
Internet
and
Consumer
Choice
 http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/The‐Internet‐and‐Consumer‐Choice.aspx
 
 How
Much
Information?
2009
Report
on
American
Consumers
 http://hmi.ucsd.edu/howmuchinfo_research_report_consum.php
 
 
 
 The
New
Female
Consumer
 
 
 http://adage.com/whitepapers/whitepaper.php?id=10
 
 
 
 The
Next
Great
Generation
 
 
 http://www.thenextgreatgeneration.com/
 
 
 
 Edelman
Trust
Barometer
 
 
 http://www.edelman.com/trust/2009/
 
 
 
 Accenture
US
Consumer
Technology
Research
Findings
 http://www.accenture.com/Global/Research_and_Insights/By_Industry/Electronics_and_ High_Tech/USFindings.htm
 
 
 
 Joseph
Pine:
What
Do
Consumers
Want?
(Video)

 
 
 http://blog.ted.com/2009/01/what_do_consume.php
 
 [And
there
are
so
many
more,
new
ones
emerging
every
day…
keep
your
eyes
open]
 
 

  6. 6. 
 
 Submitted
by
Lara
Goetsch
 
 
 
 
 
 Presentation
from
Theatre
Communications
Group
Conference,
June
2010
 “Social
Media
Strategy:
Why
ROI
Isn’t
Enough”
 http://www.devonvsmith.com/2010/06/theatre­social­media­tcg­2010/
 
 •••••
 
 
 “15
Ways
to
Measure
Return
on
Engagement
(ROE)
of
Social
Media”
 http://prsarahevans.com/2009/05/15­ways­to­measure­return­on­engagement­ roe­of­social­media/
 •••••
 
 

 
 Return
On
Engagement
by
Tim
Frick
 http://returnonengagement.net/
 
 •••••
 
 
 
 YouTube.com:
“Social
Media
ROI:
Socialnomics”
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypmfs3z8esI

 

  7. 7. 
 
 
 “HOW
TO:
Measure
Social
Media
ROI”
by
Christina
Warren
 http://mashable.com/2009/10/27/social‐media‐roi/
 
 
 •••••
 
 
 HOW
TO
Sell
Social
Media
to
Cynics,
Skeptics
&
Luddites
–
Tips,
Resources
&
Advice
 http://www.interactiveinsightsgroup.com/blog1/how‐to‐sell‐social‐media‐to‐cynics‐skeptics‐ luddites‐tips‐resources‐advice/
 
 
 
 •••••
 
 
 
 
 ROI
(Results
on
Insights):
Nonprofit
Examples
of
How
Listening
Returns
Value
 http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2009/01/roi‐nonprofit‐examples‐of‐how‐listening‐returns‐ value.html
 
 
 •••••
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Nonprofits
Are
Fortresses.
Will
Free
Agents
Set
You
Free?
 http://www.frogloop.com/care2blog/2010/6/17/nonprofits‐are‐fortresses‐will‐free‐agents‐set‐ you‐free.html
 
 
 

  8. 8. 
 
 
 
 The
Networked
Nonprofit
by
Beth
Kanter
and
Allison
Fine
 http://www.amazon.com/Networked‐Nonprofit‐Connecting‐Social‐Change/dp/0470547979
 
 
 •••••
 
 
 
 EVALUATING
SOCIA
MEDIA
FOR
CLASSICAL

 
 
 Evaluating
Social
Media
for
Classical
Music
Organization
 http://www.artsengagementexchange.org/blog/entry/evaluating_socia_media_for_classical_musi c_organization/
 
 
 •••••
 
 
 
 EVALUATING
SOCIA
MEDIA
FOR
CLASSICAL

 
 
 Can
social
marketers
catch
the
“ROI
leprechaun”?
 http://smartblogs.com/socialmedia/2010/06/21/can‐social‐marketers‐catch‐the‐roi‐ leprechaun/
 
 
 

  9. 9. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 American
For
The
Arts
Half­Century
Summit
 
 Making
Big
Things
Happen
 
 BIOS
AND
BACKGROUND
INFO
 
 
 

  10. 10. 
 
 
 Brian
Reich
 Author
&
managing
director,
little
m
media
 
 Brian
is
the
managing
director
of
little
m
media.
He
provides
strategic
guidance
and
 other
support
to
organizations
around
the
use
of
the
internet
and
technology
for
 communications,
engagement,
education,
and
mobilization.
Brian
is
also
the
author
 of
Media
Rules!:
Mastering
Today’s
Technology
to
Connect
With
and
Keep
Your
 Audience
(Wiley
2007).
 
 Brian
is
a
regular
writer
and
speaker
on
the
issues
involving
the
impact
of
the
 internet
and
technology
on
politics,
society,
and
the
media.
He
works
with
brands
 and
marketers,
nonprofits
and
charities,
media
companies
and
 sports/entertainment/culture
groups.
He
has
contributed
to
dozens
of
books
and
 other
projects
and
teaches
consumer
behavior
and
marketing
strategy
at
Columbia
 University.
He
is
the
editor
of
Thinking
About
Media
 (www.thinkingaboutmedia.com)
and
contributes
as
a
Fast
Company
Expert.
 
 Brian
and
his
wife,
Karen
Dahl,
live
in
New
York,
NY
with
their
son,
Henry,
and
 daughter,
Lucy.
 
 
 

  11. 11. 
 
 Lara
Goetsch
 Director
of
Marketing
and
Communications,
TimeLine
Theatre
Company
 773.281.8463
x25
|
lara@timelinetheatre.com
 
 Lara
has
been
a
Company
member
of
TimeLine
Theatre
Company
since
1998
and
 joined
TimeLine’s
full‐time
staff
in
July
2006
as
Director
of
Marketing
and
 Communications.
During
her
tenure
on
staff,
TimeLine
has
more
than
doubled
its
 annual
earned
income
and
increased
subscriptions
by
195%,
although
the
 company’s
annual
marketing
budget
has
increased
just
5%
over
that
time.
 
 She
served
as
producer
for
many
of
TimeLine's
early
productions,
including
three
 that
received
Non‐Equity
Jeff
Awards
for
Outstanding
Production:
Not
About
 Nightingales,
The
Crucible
and
Awake
and
Sing!.
Other
previous
credits
with
 TimeLine
include
marketing
director
for
numerous
individual
productions
and
 serving
as
a
member
of
the
Board
of
Directors.
As
a
photographer,
she
has
created
 nearly
all
of
TimeLine's
publicity
and
production
photographs
since
the
company's
 inception.
 
 Lara
previously
was
Director
of
Marketing
and
Public
Relations
at
The
Theatre
 School
at
DePaul
University,
where
she
worked
for
13
seasons
coordinating
 publicity,
marketing
strategy
and
special
events
for
the
Midwest's
leading
theatre
 training
conservatory.
In
Chicago
she
has
also
worked
at
the
Next
Theatre,
 Roadworks
Productions
and
Gateway
Theatre
Company.
She
holds
a
B.S.
degree
in
 journalism
from
the
Medill
School
of
Journalism
at
Northwestern
University,
and
 was
a
founding
member
and
former
co‐chair
of
the
Medill
Alumni
Club
of
Chicago.
 She
has
been
a
member
of
the
Publicity
Club
of
Chicago
and
currently
serves
as
 chair
of
the
marketing
committee
of
the
League
of
Chicago
Theatres.
 
 Lara
has
presented
on
the
topics
of
marketing
return‐on‐investment
and/or
email
 marketing
at
Chicago’s
Arts
Engagement
Exchange
Learning
Circles
in
2008
and
 2009;
the
2009
Americans
for
the
Arts
National
Arts
Marketing
Conference
in
 Providence,
Rhode
Island;
and
the
2010
Advanced
Training
Program
of
the
National
 Arts
Marketing
Project
in
Minneapolis,
Minnesota.
 
 
 

  12. 12. 
 
 
 
 Founded
in
April
1997,
TimeLine
Theatre
Company’s
mission
is
to
present
stories
 inspired
by
history
that
connect
with
today’s
social
and
political
issues.
During
its
 first
13
seasons,
TimeLine
has
presented
43
productions,
including
six
world
 premieres
and
12
Chicago
premieres.
Recipient
of
the
2006
Alford‐Axelson
Award
 for
Nonprofit
Managerial
Excellence
and
the
2009
Richard
Goodman
Strategic
 Planning
Award
from
the
Association
for
Strategic
Planning,
TimeLine
has
received
 42
Jeff
Awards,
including
an
award
for
Outstanding
Production
seven
times.
For
 more
information,
visit
http://www.timelinetheatre.com.
 
 

  13. 13. 
 
 Jeffrey
Inscho
 Media
&
Public
Relations,
The
Mattress
Factory
 412.231.3169
x230|
jeffrey@mattress.org

 
 Jeffrey
Inscho
built
his
first
website
in
the
Fall
of
1996
while
pursuing
an
 undergraduate
degree
in
Communications
Media
at
Indiana
University
of
 Pennsylvania.
In
2007,
after
several
years
in
the
corporate
sector,
he
jumped
at
the
 chance
to
tell
the
story
of
his
favorite
museum
(The
Mattress
Factory).
In
addition
to
 managing
the
Mattress
Factory’s
traditional
media
and
public
relations
programs,
 Jeffrey
is
responsible
for
developing
and
implementing
Friendship
2.0,
a
 comprehensive
social
and
new
media
initiative
designed
to
engage
and
grow
 dynamic
community
around
the
equally
dynamic
art
the
museum
commissions.
 
 Jeffrey
is
frequently
invited
to
lecture
at
universities
and
present
sessions
&
 keynotes
at
professional
conferences
throughout
the
United
States.
When
not
 working,
he
enjoys
writing
words
+
music
(sometimes
putting
them
together)
and
 spending
as
much
time
as
possible
laughing
with
his
wife
and
son.
 
 

  14. 14. 
 
 
 
 
 
 The
Mattress
Factory
is
a
museum
of
contemporary
art
that
exhibits
room‐sized
 works
called
installations.
Created
on
site
by
artists
from
across
the
country
and
 around
the
world,
our
unique
exhibitions
feature
a
variety
of
media
that
engage
all
 of
the
senses.

 
 The
Museum's
unusual
galleries
are
located
in
two
creatively
reused
buildings
on
 Pittsburgh’s
historic
North
Side.
Both
buildings
house
a
growing‐and
distinctive‐
 permanent
collection,
featuring
artists
James
Turrell,
Yayoi
Kusama,
Winifred
Lutz
 and
Rolf
Julius,
as
well
as
innovative
exhibitions
that
change
throughout
the
year.
 
 Since
1977,
the
Mattress
Factory
has
supported
more
than
400
artists
through
our
 world‐renowned
residency
program.
Each
year
artists
come
to
Pittsburgh,
live
at
 the
museum,
and
create
new
work.


During
their
time
here,
the
museum
supports
 them
completely
while
they
experiment,
take
risks,
and
explore
the
creative
process.
 
 Each
exhibition
is
paired
with
a
variety
of
engaging
and
inventive
educational
 programs
including
hands‐on
art
projects,
workshops,
lectures,
and
tours.
The
 Mattress
Factory
encourages
all
viewers,
regardless
of
their
background,
to
discover
 connections
between
art,
creativity
and
their
everyday
lives.
 
 http://www.mattress.org
 


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