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Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
Fostering Children's Thinking
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Fostering Children's Thinking

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This presentations provides a working definition of fostering children's thinking skills. In addition, it gives examples and strategies for how teachers can foster children's thinking skills in the …

This presentations provides a working definition of fostering children's thinking skills. In addition, it gives examples and strategies for how teachers can foster children's thinking skills in the classroom. This presentation also connects fostering children's thinking skills to the Early Learning Framework. The Power Point also provides suggestions for teachers on how to improve their ability to foster children's thinking skills. Unfortunately, video clips are not included in the presentation.

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  • 1. FOSTERING CHILDREN’S THINKING SKILLS JANUARY 2012 V. 2
  • 2. FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE PRACTICE SUPPORTING SCHOOL READINESS FOR ALL CHILDREN Social and Emotional Support WellOrganized Classrooms Instructional Instructional Interactions Interactions Fostering Children’s Thinking
  • 3. OBJECTIVES • Provide a definition of fostering children’s thinking skills. • Give examples and strategies for how teachers can foster children’s thinking skills in the classroom. • Connect fostering children’s thinking skills to the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework. • Provide suggestions for teachers on how to improve their ability to foster children’s thinking skills.
  • 4. FOSTERING CHILDREN’S THINKING SKILLS What does it look like? • Classroom interactions that focus on “big ideas” and deepen children’s knowledge of the world around them. • Children’s thinking skills can be fostered during interactions that involve: − Using the scientific method − Problem-solving − Applying knowledge What does it NOT look like? • Drilling children on facts or skills.
  • 5. FOSTERING CHILDREN’S THINKING SKILLS BY USING THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD • Provide tasks where children can observe, predict, and experiment.
  • 6. FOSTERING CHILDREN’S THINKING SKILLS BY PROBLEM SOLVING • Create opportunities for children to brainstorm, plan and solve problems.
  • 7. FOSTERING CHILDREN’S THINKING SKILLS BYAPPLYING KNOWLEDGE • Build on children’s natural curiosity by drawing upon their everyday experiences and connecting previous knowledge.
  • 8. THE HEAD START CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND EARLY LEARNING FRAMEWORK Fostering children’s thinking skills is important across many domains of the outcome framework. Some examples are: – Logic and reasoning – Literacy knowledge and skills – Mathematical knowledge and skills – Social and emotional development – Science knowledge and skills
  • 9. IN THIS CLIP, THE TEACHER ASKED CHILDREN TO PREDICT AND CONNECT IDEAS Asked children to predict what types of plants they might see on their nature walk Connect ideas about nature with the book the class read the previous day Supports children’s logic and reasoning skills
  • 10. IN THIS CLIP, THE TEACHER ASKED CHILDREN TO BRAINSTORM AND DRAW UPON THEIR EXPERIENCES Asked children to brainstorm about fiction vs. information books Draw upon children’s experiences when talking about pets being allowed inside. Supports children’s logic and reasoning skills
  • 11. WHEN CAN I FOSTER CHILDREN’S THINKING SKILLS? Children’s understanding can be promoted throughout the school day in many classroom activities. Some examples are: • • • • Centers Small and whole group instruction Meal and snack time Transitions
  • 12. IMPROVING PRACTICE • Teachers can videotape and watch a clip of their interactions with children during a lesson, focusing on whether and how often they fostered children’s thinking skills. • Practice with a peer—together teachers can brainstorm ways to remember to engage in interactions that foster children’s thinking skills (e.g., visual cues). • Watch “master teachers” in action.
  • 13. SUMMARY • Teachers can foster children’s thinking skills by: – Using the Scientific Method: Provide tasks where children can observe, predict, and experiment. – Problem-solving: Create opportunities for children to brainstorm, plan and solve problems. – Applying knowledge: Build on children’s natural curiosity by drawing upon their everyday experiences and connecting previous knowledge. • Fostering children’s thinking skills can occur throughout the school day. • Teachers can improve the quality and frequency with which they foster children’s thinking skills.
  • 14. For more Information, contact us at: NCQTL@UW.EDU or 877-731-0764 This document was prepared under Grant #90HC0002 for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start, by the National Center on Quality Teaching and Learning.

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