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Edu290 pp1

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  • 1. Two Party vs Multi-Party System
    • By: Chris Bragdon
    • EDU 290
  • 2. Two Party System
    • “A system in which only two significant parties compete for office. Such systems are in the minority among world democracies.”
    Fiorina, Morris P. The New American Democracy . 5th ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2007. Print.
  • 3. United States
    • The United States uses the Two Party System.
    • Currently the two parties are:
      • The Republican Party
      • The Democratic Party
  • 4. Third Parties in America
    • There have been several instances in which third parties have influenced the outcomes of elections, for example:
      • The Green Party
      • Bull-Moose Party
      • Progressives
  • 5. Historic Third Party Performances
    • 1856 - Millard Fillmore (American Party) - 22% of vote
    • 1860 - John Bell (Constitutional Union Party) - 12.6%
    • 1896 - William Jennings Bryan (Populist Party) - 47%
    • 1912 - Teddy Roosevelt (Bull-Moose) - 27.4%
    • 1992 - Ross Perot (Independent) - 18.9%
    • 1996 - Ross Perot (Reform Party) - 8%
    • 2000 - Ralph Nader (Green Party) - 2.7%
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notable_third_party_performances_in_United_States_elections
  • 6. Why Do Third Parties Form?
    • Normally they form to address a single issue within society and they tend to fade after the problem is taken care of.
    • “Only once has a third party replaced a major party: the Republican Party displaced the Whigs in the 1850s.”
    Fiorina, Morris P. The New American Democracy . 5th ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2007. Print.
  • 7. Third Parties in the U.S.
    • With Voter Registration over 100,000:
      • Green Party
      • Constitution Party
      • Libertarian Party
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_party_(United_States)# Largest_.28voter_registration_over_100.2C000.29 http://www.warbaby.com/dh2k/images/Party%20Logos/thirdparty.gif
  • 8. Multi-Party System
    • Most democracies have a multi-party system.
    • Often creates a coalition government.
    • This is when two minority parties join together in order to gain a majority in Parliament.
    http://interacc.typepad.com/.a/6a01053596fb28970c0115711c856c970c-350wi
  • 9. Electoral System
    • The electoral system often affects the party system of a country.
    • Electoral system - the way in which a country’s laws translate popular votes into control of public offices.
    Fiorina, Morris P. The New American Democracy . 5th ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2007. Print.
  • 10. Single-Member, Single Plurality
    • This is when elections for office take place within geographic units (states, cities, etc.) and the candidate who wins the most votes wins the election.
    Fiorina, Morris P. The New American Democracy . 5th ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2007. Print. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_XXETCNjN98s/S-LaONhHBeI/AAAAAAAAAMo/LFhQkpmuU5g/s1600/youvote.jpg
  • 11. “ If ya ain’t first you’re last!”
    • In the SMSP system, “if ya ain’t first your last.” Meaning if you don’t win then you achieve nothing at all in the election.
    http://images.wikia.com/wikiality/images/2/2a/Ricky-Bobby.jpg http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0415306/quotes?qt=qt0425214 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0415306/quotes?qt=qt0425214
  • 12. Proportional Representation
    • A more common form of an electoral system is known as the Proportional Representation (PR). There are many variations to this system.
    • “In such systems, elections may (Germany) or may not (Israel) take place within smaller geographic units, but even if they do, each unit elects a number of officials, with each party winning seats in proportion to the vote it receives.”
    Fiorina, Morris P. The New American Democracy . 5th ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2007. Print.
  • 13. Example of PR http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_H6XW_a4TYus/Si1R5LYEImI/AAAAAAAAA3o/I8zQDmHsJ24/s1600/european+parliament+2009.bmp
  • 14. PR continued...
    • Since it is not necessary to finish first in order to win seats, like it is in an SMSP system, the leaders of parties are less likely to abandon their separate organizations to combine with others. This would require them to sacrifice some of their beliefs.This allows voters to maintain allegiance to their smaller parties and a multi-party system is born.
  • 15. http://alexbowyer.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/proportional_representation_fixed.png.scaled1000.png

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