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Film and Television on the Internet

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This is a breakdown of the film download presentation I created last year. It discusses the industry as well as the effect of search and recommendation systems on online media.

This is a breakdown of the film download presentation I created last year. It discusses the industry as well as the effect of search and recommendation systems on online media.

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  • 1. Film & Television on the Internet A Market Assessment Brad Jobling April 2007 © 2007 Brad Jobling [email_address] www.linkedin.com/in/bradleyjobling
  • 2. Online Activities On A Typical Week of US Broadband Users, 2006 Title: Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p9, chart # 077441
  • 3. Top 10 Movie Web Sites in the US, June 2005 Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p13, chart # 065766
  • 4. Demographic Profile of US Visitors to the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) Web Site, Spring 2006, % Unique Audience Composition Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p12, chart # 077565
  • 5. Filmed Entertainment Spending in the US, by Category, 2005-2010 (Billions of $) Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p3, chart # 077535
  • 6. Filmed Entertainment Spending in the US, by Category, 2005-2010 (Billions of $) Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p3, chart # 077535
  • 7. Types of Delivery
    • Downloads – Downloading of content to a PC.
    • Streaming – Stream content from Internet on PC. Must maintain a live Internet connection for viewing.
    • Set-Top Boxes – Content is watched on the television via a set-top box similar to a cable box or DVR.
    • Mobile – Content available via a cell phone. Must maintain a a live connection to view.
    • Hybrid – There are multiple options of the above:
      • Mobile on a memory card
      • Downloads to a set-top box
      • Set top boxes connected to a PC
  • 8. US Spending on Internet Downloads of TV Programs, 2005-2010 Title: US DVR & VOD Usage: Ad Skippers and Time Shifters; Authors: Macklin, Ben; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p16, chart # 078104
  • 9. Devices on which US Young Adult Internet Users Would Watch a TV Show, by Age and Gender, Jun-Jul 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p27, chart # 0 76027
  • 10. US Adult Internet Users Who Are Likely to Purchase On-Demand Online Video Programming, by Age and Gender, October 2005 Title: US DVR & VOD Usage: Ad Skippers and Time Shifters; Authors: Macklin, Ben; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p17, chart # 071030
  • 11. Number of New Feature Films Released in the US, by Distributor, 1995-2005 Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p4, chart # 077562
  • 12. MPAA Member Company Average Theatrical Marketing Costs per Film, 1985-2005 Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p9, chart # 077563
  • 13. MPAA Member Subsidiary/Affiliate Average Theatrical Marketing Costs per Film, 2001-2005 Title: Hollywood Online: Getting the Big Picture; Authors: Belcher, James; Source: eMarketer; Nov 2006, p9, chart # 077564
  • 14. Watch Now (Netflix)
    • Rolling out a service where users can watch a certain number of hours per month online, based on their DVD rental plan.
    • This is in addition to their DVD rentals.
    • $17.99 plan/3 DVDs per month, 18 hours of viewing.
    • Service is 2 years in the making.
    • Spent $5 to $10 million last year to build. Will spend $40 million this year.
    • Will launch with 1,000 titles.
    Title: Netflix rolls out VOD rental plan; subs get it free; Authors: Bond, Paul; Source: Hollywood Reporter -- International Edition; 1/16/2007, Vol. 397 Issue 44, p2-93, 2p
  • 15. Watch Now (con't)
    • This will be a phased roll out occurring from Jan 07 to Jun 07.
    • Plan to expands service to any Internet enabled device, including cellphones.
    • By end of 2007, plans 4.2 million subscribers out of their 8 million total.
    • The company does not plan to sell movies via download.
    Title: Netflix rolls out VOD rental plan; subs get it free.; Authors: Bond, Paul ; Source: Hollywood Reporter -- International Edition; 1/16/2007, Vol. 397 Issue 44, p2-93, 2p Title: Netflix plans to offer movies on cellphones; Authors: Kapko, Matt; Source: RCR Wireless News; 1/22/2007, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p15-15, 1/4p Title: Netflix Delivers Upbeat News; Source: Business Week Online; 1/26/2007, p28-28, 1p
  • 16. Long Tail & Netflix
    • 30% of Netflix rentals are new releases, 70% of Blockbuster rentals are new releases. Both have the same customer demographics.
    • Netflix has positioned itself to purchase exclusive distribution rights through Red Envelope.
    • Netflix uses its extensive data mine of customer preferences to determine viability of hard to market titles.
    Title: The Mail-Order Movie House That Clobbered Blockbusterl Authors: Mullaney, Timothy J.; Source: Business Week; 6/5/2006 Issue 3987, p56-57, 2p, 1c Title: Mailboxes, Etc. ; Authors:Tobias, Scott; Source: Hollywood Reporter -- International Edition; Aug2006 Supplement, Vol. 395 Issue 25, p20-20, 1/2p, 1c
  • 17. Long Tail & Netflix (con't)
    • Netflix has become vital to the independent film business.
    • Netflix is doing what college film societies did in the 60's and the 70's. Creating audiences for new European films and old European masters.
    • Netflix has created exclusive deals with NBC to make The West Wing , Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip , and Kidnapped available to Netflix subscribers 6 weeks before their network TV preview.
  • 18. Deloitte POV
    • PC VOD services will have limited success in the short-term.
    • It will take a decade before broadband speeds make PC VOD w orthwhile.
    • For now, streaming seems to provide the best results.
    • VOD is best deployed for non-blockbuster content that video stores cannot stock due to limited demand.
    • Yet, there will still be an increasing simultaneous release of PC VOD and DVDs.
    Title: Long download times will hinder growth of PC VoD; Authors: McCormick, Andrew; Source: New Media Age; 12/21/2006, p4-4, 1/6p Title: Media Predictions, TMT Trends 2007, Auhor: Brightman, Igal, Source: Deloitte: Technology, Media & Telecommunications, p4, p11 & p16
  • 19. Deloitte POV
    • Media companies should not rely on the long tail to rekindle the appeal of every title in their archive. Search tools (pull) and recommendations (push) are still rudimentary. These will continue to improve over time.
    • “ The public's readiness to pay for content varies between geographies, changes over time and its influenced by a growing range of factors, from technology to disposable income.”
    • As far as long tail & media are concerned, a bricks has room for the top 20, clicks the top 10, and mobile the top 5.
  • 20. Additional POV
    • The big revenue is in DVD sales and not DVD rentals. This worries studio execs. (What does it mean for VOD?)
    • 10 years ago TV programs had limited means of revenue via broadcasting. The DVD market has changed that.
    • Some downloadable films are more expensive than their DVDs & offer less features.
    • A higher quality IPTV is coming fast & should be a $13 billion market by 2010.
    Title: Netflix adds its own pix to mix; Authors: Zeitchik, Steven; Source: Variety; 2/27/2006, Vol. 402 Issue 2, p9-9, 1p, 2c Title: Movie Downloads Are Still a Flop; Authors: Tynan, Dan; Source:PC World; Dec2006, Vol. 24 Issue 12, p30-30, 1p, 1 chart, 1bw Title:As Audio On Demand Hits Its Stride, Video On Demand Isn't Far Behind; Authors:David, Mark; Source:Electronic Design; 11/16/2006, Vol. 54 Issue 26, p17-17, 1p
  • 21. Additional POV (con't)
    • Emerging media is creating sub-niche audiences.
    • In the Internet world it is better to specialize that become too broad.
    • There are 1000s of filmmakers who say they cannot find distributors and 1000s of distributors who cannot find quality films.
    • On demand viewing for TV audiences has created new markets.
    • Segments missed during normal viewing time can be watched later and prevent audience decline.
    • BBC iPlayer users viewed programs they normally wouldn't have time to watch. This was due to it's on-demand content.
  • 22. Search & Recommendation
    • Recommendations cannot be driven purely by technology nor historical purchases.
    • Customer ranking, purchasing history and archivists suggestions make the best search and recommendation tools.
    • Tagging of content will be key to success in any search or recommendation.
    • Sophisticated tools exist to scan blogs, chat rooms, bulletin boards and other forums to ascertain what video content interests users.
    Title: Media Predictions, TMT Trends 2007, Auhor: Brightman, Igal, Source: Deloitte: Technology, Media & Telecommunications, p11 & p16
  • 23. Recommendation
    • Become a distributor for independents before Netflix.
    • Offer DRM free downloads.
    • Create detailed customer data profiles of customers in audio and video.
    • Offer promotional trial periods & free downloads.
    • Target set-top boxes, institutional markets, retailers, IPTV networks.
    • Become a player in own right or be acquired later for rights.
    • Create a video genome project?
  • 24. Appendix
  • 25. US Online Adults (18-34) Who Are Interested in Watching TV Shows & Films on TVs and PCs, 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p27, chart # 070473
  • 26. US Adult Internet Users Who Regularly or Occasionally Download or Stream Video or Television Content, By Gender, Jul–Aug 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p8, chart # 077823
  • 27. US Online Video Viewers Who Have Ever Paid to Watch Any Type of Video Online, Jul-Aug 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p18, chart # 077479
  • 28. Aspects of Watching Online Videos that US Online Viewers Enjoy, Jul-Aug 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p16, chart # 076597
  • 29. Aspects of Watching Online Videos that US Online Video Viewers Do Not Enjoy, Jul-Aug 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p16, chart # 076598
  • 30. Types of Online Video Watched Frequently or Occasionally by US Internet Users, Feb 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p23, chart # 078706
  • 31. Types of Online Video that US Online Video Viewers Watch Once a Week or More Frequently, Feb 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p23, chart # 077863
  • 32. Non-Traditional Ways that US Consumers Watch TV Programs, Jan 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p27, chart # 078701
  • 33. US Internet Users' Interest in Computing, Television and Cellphone Feature Convergence, Feb 2006 Title Internet Video Audience; Authors: Hallerman, David; Source: eMarketer; Dec 2006, p28, chart # 078167