INSPIRE<br />Designing an online community for students interested in STEM and NASA<br />
Traditional vs. Online <br />
Keys to Online Learning Successthe Environment<br />Activities<br />Relevant content<br />Applicable knowledge constructio...
Keys to Online Learning Successthe Participant<br />Flexible to different ways of learning<br />Build understanding and me...
Facilitation Cont.<br />Online learning needs to:<br />“Be facilitated or guided by fully accessible teachers or instructo...
Characteristics of the INSPIRE Environment<br /><ul><li>Choice of Activities
NASA content interesting to HS students
Students use knowledge for activities
Initial Agreement, points for activities
To inspire, engage and educate students</li></ul>Activities<br />Relevant content<br />Applicable knowledge construction<b...
INSPIRE Support for Online Learning Success the Participant<br />Flexible to different ways of learning<br />Build underst...
Activities, competitions, questioning
Students encouraged to ask questions
Student advisory board
24/7 access
Tech support on demand, computers for high needs</li></li></ul><li>
Facilitation in INSPIRE OLC<br />Incorporate instructional design practices that allow for individual decision making<br /...
Live and asynchronous events
Collaborative work spaces, competitions for teams
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NSTA Saturday Evening Presentation On Inspire 3 18 2010

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A brief review of the design and success of the NASA INSPIRE online learning community.

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NSTA Saturday Evening Presentation On Inspire 3 18 2010

  1. 1. INSPIRE<br />Designing an online community for students interested in STEM and NASA<br />
  2. 2. Traditional vs. Online <br />
  3. 3. Keys to Online Learning Successthe Environment<br />Activities<br />Relevant content<br />Applicable knowledge construction<br />Clear expectations and rules of conduct<br />Thoughtfully designed and delivered with goals and outcomes<br />
  4. 4. Keys to Online Learning Successthe Participant<br />Flexible to different ways of learning<br />Build understanding and meaning<br />Self-directed and self-actualized<br />Learner motivated<br />Time management<br />Comfortableness with technology<br />
  5. 5. Facilitation Cont.<br />Online learning needs to:<br />“Be facilitated or guided by fully accessible teachers or instructors skilled in both science content and pedagogy in an e-learning environment”<br />“Promote frequent interaction between teacher and learner to allow continuous monitoring and adjustment of the dynamic learning environment”<br />NSTA 2008<br />
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
  8. 8. Characteristics of the INSPIRE Environment<br /><ul><li>Choice of Activities
  9. 9. NASA content interesting to HS students
  10. 10. Students use knowledge for activities
  11. 11. Initial Agreement, points for activities
  12. 12. To inspire, engage and educate students</li></ul>Activities<br />Relevant content<br />Applicable knowledge construction<br />Clear expectations and rules of conduct<br />Thoughtfully designed and delivered with goals and outcomes<br />
  13. 13.
  14. 14.
  15. 15. INSPIRE Support for Online Learning Success the Participant<br />Flexible to different ways of learning<br />Build understanding and meaning<br />Self-directed and self-actualized<br />Learner motivated<br />Time management<br />Comfortableness with technology<br /><ul><li>Speakers, chats, reading material, video
  16. 16. Activities, competitions, questioning
  17. 17. Students encouraged to ask questions
  18. 18. Student advisory board
  19. 19. 24/7 access
  20. 20. Tech support on demand, computers for high needs</li></li></ul><li>
  21. 21. Facilitation in INSPIRE OLC<br />Incorporate instructional design practices that allow for individual decision making<br />Connect learners – both students and science educators<br />Collaborative learning experiences with experts and other learners<br />Conduct ongoing evaluation<br /><ul><li>Individual work spaces
  22. 22. Live and asynchronous events
  23. 23. Collaborative work spaces, competitions for teams
  24. 24. Evaluation includes web stats, analysis of interactions, student surveys, parent surveys</li></li></ul><li>
  25. 25. The FutureWhat role will these play?<br />Second Life/TSL<br />Social Networking, Twitter, Blogs<br />HCI – Computers that predict – Just in time, just in time learning<br />Cloud computing<br />Wikis<br />The Google<br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. Results<br /><ul><li>1800 students involved
  28. 28. Students are online an average of twice a week
  29. 29. Chats attended by10to100 students
  30. 30. 1892 Different discussion threads
  31. 31. 585students completed1435activities as indicated by point collection</li></li></ul><li>Results Cont.<br />According to students, the OLC…<br />Provides contextual information<br />Integrates knowledge<br />Has clear goals<br />Provides relevant skills and resources<br />Has a variety of spaces that engage<br />
  32. 32. Future Questions<br /><ul><li>Are there cycles of participation?
  33. 33. Do students stick with their rate of participation and choices of activities? If not, what causes change?
  34. 34. Why do students participate in chats? Why don’t others participate? What do participants gain?
  35. 35. Do students participate throughout high school?
  36. 36. What activities are added, dropped or changed over time? Why?</li></li></ul><li>Thanks!<br />brad@techforlearning.org<br />hilarie@techforlearning.org<br />
  37. 37. References<br />Brown, J.S., Collins, A. & Duguid, S. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18(1), 32-42.<br /> <br />žCognition & Technology Group at Vanderbilt (March 1993). Anchored instruction and situated cognition revisited. Educational Technology, 33(3), 52-70. <br />žKim, A. (2000). Community Building on the Web: Secret Strategies for Successful Online Communities. Peachpit Press, NY <br />žLave, J. (1988). Cognition in Practice: Mind, mathematics, and culture in everyday life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. <br />žLave, J., & Wenger, E. (1990). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.<br />
  38. 38. References Cont.<br />Lesser, E. L. and Storck, J. (2001) 'Communities of practice and organizational performance', IBM Systems Journal 40(4), http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/404/lesser.html. Accessed October 22, 2006. <br />žLuppicini, R. (2007). Online Learning Communities: Perspectives in Industrial Technology and Distance Learning. Information Age Publishing, NY<br />žMerrill, H., DiSilvestro, F. and Young, R. (2003). Assessing & Improving Online Learning Using Data from Practice. Presented at the Midwest Research-to-practice Conference in Adult, Continuing and Community Education, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Oct. 8-10.<br />žPalloff, R. and Pratt, K. (2007). Building Online Learning Communities: Effective Strategies for the Virtual Classroom (2nd Ed). Jossey-Bass, NY.<br />žPreece, J. (2000). Online Communities: Designing Usability and Supporting Socialability. Wiley, NY.<br />
  39. 39. References Cont.<br />Smith, M. K. (2003) 'Communities of practice', the encyclopedia of informal education, www.infed.org/biblio/communities_of_practice.htm.<br />žSong, L., Singleton, E., Hill, J. and Koh, M. (2004). Improving online learning: Students perceptions of useful and challenging characteristics . The Internet and Higher Education. Vol. 7, Issue 1, pgs 59-70. <br />žTu, C. (2004). Online Collaborative Learning Communities: Twenty-One Designs to Build an Online Collaborative Learning Community. Libraries Unlimited, NY.<br />žWenger, E. (1998) 'Communities of Practice. Learning as a social system', Systems Thinker, http://www.co-i-l.com/coil/knowledge-garden/cop/lss.shtml. Accessed October 23, 2006.<br />

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