NSTA Saturday Evening Presentation On Inspire 3 18 2010

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A brief review of the design and success of the NASA INSPIRE online learning community.

A brief review of the design and success of the NASA INSPIRE online learning community.

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Transcript

  • 1. INSPIRE
    Designing an online community for students interested in STEM and NASA
  • 2. Traditional vs. Online
  • 3. Keys to Online Learning Successthe Environment
    Activities
    Relevant content
    Applicable knowledge construction
    Clear expectations and rules of conduct
    Thoughtfully designed and delivered with goals and outcomes
  • 4. Keys to Online Learning Successthe Participant
    Flexible to different ways of learning
    Build understanding and meaning
    Self-directed and self-actualized
    Learner motivated
    Time management
    Comfortableness with technology
  • 5. Facilitation Cont.
    Online learning needs to:
    “Be facilitated or guided by fully accessible teachers or instructors skilled in both science content and pedagogy in an e-learning environment”
    “Promote frequent interaction between teacher and learner to allow continuous monitoring and adjustment of the dynamic learning environment”
    NSTA 2008
  • 6.
  • 7.
  • 8. Characteristics of the INSPIRE Environment
    • Choice of Activities
    • 9. NASA content interesting to HS students
    • 10. Students use knowledge for activities
    • 11. Initial Agreement, points for activities
    • 12. To inspire, engage and educate students
    Activities
    Relevant content
    Applicable knowledge construction
    Clear expectations and rules of conduct
    Thoughtfully designed and delivered with goals and outcomes
  • 13.
  • 14.
  • 15. INSPIRE Support for Online Learning Success the Participant
    Flexible to different ways of learning
    Build understanding and meaning
    Self-directed and self-actualized
    Learner motivated
    Time management
    Comfortableness with technology
    • Speakers, chats, reading material, video
    • 16. Activities, competitions, questioning
    • 17. Students encouraged to ask questions
    • 18. Student advisory board
    • 19. 24/7 access
    • 20. Tech support on demand, computers for high needs
  • 21. Facilitation in INSPIRE OLC
    Incorporate instructional design practices that allow for individual decision making
    Connect learners – both students and science educators
    Collaborative learning experiences with experts and other learners
    Conduct ongoing evaluation
    • Individual work spaces
    • 22. Live and asynchronous events
    • 23. Collaborative work spaces, competitions for teams
    • 24. Evaluation includes web stats, analysis of interactions, student surveys, parent surveys
  • 25. The FutureWhat role will these play?
    Second Life/TSL
    Social Networking, Twitter, Blogs
    HCI – Computers that predict – Just in time, just in time learning
    Cloud computing
    Wikis
    The Google
  • 26.
  • 27. Results
    • 1800 students involved
    • 28. Students are online an average of twice a week
    • 29. Chats attended by10to100 students
    • 30. 1892 Different discussion threads
    • 31. 585students completed1435activities as indicated by point collection
  • Results Cont.
    According to students, the OLC…
    Provides contextual information
    Integrates knowledge
    Has clear goals
    Provides relevant skills and resources
    Has a variety of spaces that engage
  • 32. Future Questions
    • Are there cycles of participation?
    • 33. Do students stick with their rate of participation and choices of activities? If not, what causes change?
    • 34. Why do students participate in chats? Why don’t others participate? What do participants gain?
    • 35. Do students participate throughout high school?
    • 36. What activities are added, dropped or changed over time? Why?
  • Thanks!
    brad@techforlearning.org
    hilarie@techforlearning.org
  • 37. References
    Brown, J.S., Collins, A. & Duguid, S. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18(1), 32-42.
     
    žCognition & Technology Group at Vanderbilt (March 1993). Anchored instruction and situated cognition revisited. Educational Technology, 33(3), 52-70. 
    žKim, A. (2000). Community Building on the Web: Secret Strategies for Successful Online Communities. Peachpit Press, NY 
    žLave, J. (1988). Cognition in Practice: Mind, mathematics, and culture in everyday life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 
    žLave, J., & Wenger, E. (1990). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • 38. References Cont.
    Lesser, E. L. and Storck, J. (2001) 'Communities of practice and organizational performance', IBM Systems Journal 40(4), http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/404/lesser.html. Accessed October 22, 2006.
    žLuppicini, R. (2007). Online Learning Communities: Perspectives in Industrial Technology and Distance Learning. Information Age Publishing, NY
    žMerrill, H., DiSilvestro, F. and Young, R. (2003). Assessing & Improving Online Learning Using Data from Practice. Presented at the Midwest Research-to-practice Conference in Adult, Continuing and Community Education, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Oct. 8-10.
    žPalloff, R. and Pratt, K. (2007). Building Online Learning Communities: Effective Strategies for the Virtual Classroom (2nd Ed). Jossey-Bass, NY.
    žPreece, J. (2000). Online Communities: Designing Usability and Supporting Socialability. Wiley, NY.
  • 39. References Cont.
    Smith, M. K. (2003) 'Communities of practice', the encyclopedia of informal education, www.infed.org/biblio/communities_of_practice.htm.
    žSong, L., Singleton, E., Hill, J. and Koh, M. (2004). Improving online learning: Students perceptions of useful and challenging characteristics . The Internet and Higher Education. Vol. 7, Issue 1, pgs 59-70. 
    žTu, C. (2004). Online Collaborative Learning Communities: Twenty-One Designs to Build an Online Collaborative Learning Community. Libraries Unlimited, NY.
    žWenger, E. (1998) 'Communities of Practice. Learning as a social system', Systems Thinker, http://www.co-i-l.com/coil/knowledge-garden/cop/lss.shtml. Accessed October 23, 2006.