Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

The Bonner High-Impact Initiative

4,453

Published on

This is a presentation about the Bonner High-Impact Initiative. This presentation will be given by Ariane Hoy and Mathew Johnson at various colleges, including Allegheny College.

This is a presentation about the Bonner High-Impact Initiative. This presentation will be given by Ariane Hoy and Mathew Johnson at various colleges, including Allegheny College.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,453
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Bonner High-Impact InitiativeAn Overview and VisionFebruary 9, 2012
    • 2. The Bonner High-ImpactEngagement Initiative✤ Introduction to the Bonner Network✤ A proven program model✤ Where this idea came from✤ Our theory of change and strategy✤ How you are and can be involved
    • 3. Introduction... to the core of Bonner
    • 4. Introduction to Our National NetworkBonner Scholar and Leader Programs at more than 60 institutions of higher educationA Live Google Map
    • 5. Who is aBonner?✤ A committed undergraduate— likely from a low-income background (85%+)✤ Joins a cohort-based program✤ Serves 8-10 hours every week, across four years✤ Interns with local, national and international organizations during the school year and full-time in summer✤ Participates in education, training, meetings, reflection✤ Is more likely to graduate and have better grades
    • 6. The BonnerNetwork✤ 60 active Bonner Scholar and Leader Programs; 15 start-up✤ Diverse liberal arts institutions, public and private✤ 3,000+ students✤ Focus on under-represented students: low income, students of color, First Generation✤ 5,000+ alumni✤ 25 endowed campus programs at $163 million total
    • 7. A proven program model... with elements to scale
    • 8. ProvenProgram Model✤ Student learning, development and leadership✤ Reciprocal community partnerships and impact✤ Campus infrastructure and culture of service
    • 9. Student ImpactLongitudinal assessment involving 25campus programs; pre and postassessment✤ Four years are significant✤ Proven skill learning (developmental model)✤ Commitment to social justice✤ Dialogue across difference✤ Structured and unstructured reflection✤ The importance of mentors✤ Civic-minded professionalism
    • 10. DeepPartnerships✤ 910,620 hours of service in 2011✤ Developmental multi-year partnerships✤ Partners as co-educators✤ Connecting all available campus assets to community needs✤ Direct service, CBR, service- learning projects, policy research
    • 11. CampusInfrastructure✤ Infrastructure for community service and academic community engagement✤ FIPSE funded model for civic engagement minors and certificates✤ Seeding community based research over 15 years at 30+ institutions✤ Staffing model that builds the capacity, range and depth of campus program
    • 12. Alumni Impact30 campuses, 1066 Participants; 22-50years old; 32% response rate✤ 33% in non-profit sector careers✤ 32% in government careers✤ 25% in for-profit careers✤ Career choices driven by a desire to affect positive change✤ 90% demonstrating civic action in past 12 months ✤ joined organization; signed petition; did not buy a product due to company values; contacted a public official✤ 90% voted in last election
    • 13. Bonner Alumni Remain Engagedvolunteering at notably higher rates than average U.S. citizens Average Volunteering Rates vs. Bonner Graduates 50 37.5 25 12.5 Average Citizen=26.3% 0 Average College Graduate=42.3% Bonner Graduates=49.2%
    • 14. Where this idea came from... listening to our network
    • 15. Origins of theInitiative✤ Vision—Aim to be at the cutting edge of institutional change✤ Data—NASCE✤ Learning—HIPs✤ Practice—HICEPs
    • 16. Why change isneeded?✤ Higher education at a Crucible Moment✤ Financial challenges✤ Structural changes✤ Performance crisis✤ A unique opportunity
    • 17. Data—NationalAssessment of Service &Community Engagement✤ Developed by Siena Research Institute as a gauge of institutional engagement✤ Implemented by 35+ institutions✤ 14K completes—now the largest national data set on civic engagement✤ Telling findings—more than half of students are never engaged✤ Average POP score - mid 20’s✤ Structure matters
    • 18. Learning—AcademicCommunity Engagementat a Crossroads✤ Three Learn & Serve grants and fifteen years working on CBR (building for PolicyOptions)✤ FIPSE-funded civic engagement minor and certificate (like VESA)✤ Assessment points to the importance but limits of course-based service- learning✤ Broader calls in the field for the re- imagination of service-learning✤ The most successful initiatives (BTtoP, Greater Expectations) cross boundaries and inform institutional change
    • 19. Engaged Learning—High Impact ~ first year seminarsPractices (HIPs) ~ common intellectual experiences  ~ learning communities  ~ writing-intensive courses✤ Generated from the Liberal ~collaborative assignments & projects  Education and America’s ~ undergraduate research Promise (LEAP) Initiative, a ~ diversity/global learning  project of the American Association of Colleges and ~ internships & project-based learning Universities (AAC&U) ~ service-learning & community-based learning✤ Proven to be effective with ~ capstone courses & projects higher than expected student learning and success, especially with under- represented students✤ ALL of them could be connected with community engagement
    • 20. Practice—The Field isPushing Towards Results-Oriented Approaches✤ The recession and troubled economy has driven increased demand on non- profit and government organizations’ services✤ Shrinking public funding and declining revenues have contributed to tightening expenditures and cuts✤ Nonprofit mergers are increasing— driven not only by fiscal concerns but by aims to improve efficiency✤ Campus-community partnerships with long histories still need strategies and tools to measure their contribution and social impact
    • 21. Practice—High ImpactCommunity EngagementPractices (HICEPs)✤ Developed by the Bonner Foundation and Network’s ~ developmental sustained partnerships 20+ years of building and ~ developmental multi-semester placements managing developmental ~ site and issue based teams campus-community partnerships ~ student team leaders ~ community listening / institutional voice✤ Position campus and community in democratic ~ capacity building projects (health index) engagement, characterized ~ community-based participatory research as: projects ✤ reciprocal ~ policy research assignments & issue briefs ~ research on proven program models ✤ problem-solving oriented ~cross campus collaborations on projects ✤ knowledge co-creation (i.e., Sophomore Exchange, Capstones) ✤ many types of public spaces
    • 22. Bridging across frameworksA goal to draw out the opportunities for campuses and communities to be fully engaged
    • 23. Our theory of change...strategic campus-community teams
    • 24. High-Impact Strategic Goals✤ Scale proven best practices in community engagement by integrating them across the curriculum✤ Create more faculty participation in community engagement that is connected to evidence-based practice✤ Help campuses create and demonstrate community impact
    • 25. Four Major Strategies✤ Integrate high-impact ✤ Build, support, and educational practices and leverage campus high-impact community transformation teams engagement ✤ Be an active convener✤ Use data and evidence- and catalyst for a national based practice to drive learning community— institutional strategy spurring partnerships towards full engagement across the field that move community engagement towards greater impact
    • 26. Strategy 1Integrate high-impact educational practices and high-impact community engagement
    • 27. Illustration of Connections First Year Seminars First Year Trips / Immersions Common Intellectual Experiences Site/Team Based Project Design Learning Communities Cohort Training Meetings Writing Intensive Courses Policy Research Assignments Collaborative Projects Issue Briefs/Program Models/CBR Undergraduate Research Capacity Building Projects Diversity /Global Learning Junior (Elective) Trips / Internships Sequence of developmental placements, Internships / Project-Based Learning tied to coursework Capstone Courses Capstone Service Projects
    • 28. Strategy 2Use data and evidence-based practice to drive institutional strategy for full engagement
    • 29. Types of Data NSEE Institutional learning performance NASCE Institution wide student engagement Survey of Community Partners Satisfaction; Capacity contributions Survey of Faculty Institution wide faculty engagement Strategic Planning Issue Briefs/Program Models/CBR Proven Program Models Capacity Building Projects Indicators (Public Data) Junior (Elective) Trips / Internships Community Impact Assessments to be gathered and shared
    • 30. Year 4 on...continue to participation in Year 1 national learning community • Build team & Year 3 campus climate Student • Data collection & •Attend institute • Sustainability planning Professor Partner vision & plan • Identify assets • Refine HIcePs, projects Student • Attend institute Staff possibly others • Select & do first • Begin to HIceP Partner Professor implement impact Staff assessment Year 2 • Expand team & participation • Attend institute • Select & do next two HIcePs • Document and share learning (conferences,Strategy 3 publications)Build, support, and leverage campus transformation teams
    • 31. Strategy 4Be an active convenerand catalyst for anational learningcommunity—spurringpartnerships acrossthe field that movecommunityengagement towardsgreater impactYear 1 Cohort
    • 32. •Association of American Crucible Moment, HIPs Colleges and Universities • American Association of State Colleges & American Democracy Project Universities • Bringing Theory to Psychosocial Well-being, Assessment Practice Models • IARSLCE Research and theoretical base Collaboratories, faculty development • Imagining America paths, tenure & promotion Full Participation, institutional • NERCHE transformation, Carnegie Classification, Democratic Engagement • Open Indicators Community impact models using Consortium public data, open sourceStrategy 4National Learning Community
    • 33. How you can be involved... supporters, champions, activists, critical thinkers...

    ×