The Bonner High-Impact Initiative

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This is a presentation about the Bonner High-Impact Initiative. This presentation will be given by Ariane Hoy and Mathew Johnson at various colleges, including Allegheny College.

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  • The Bonner High-Impact Initiative

    1. 1. The Bonner High-Impact InitiativeAn Overview and VisionFebruary 9, 2012
    2. 2. The Bonner High-ImpactEngagement Initiative✤ Introduction to the Bonner Network✤ A proven program model✤ Where this idea came from✤ Our theory of change and strategy✤ How you are and can be involved
    3. 3. Introduction... to the core of Bonner
    4. 4. Introduction to Our National NetworkBonner Scholar and Leader Programs at more than 60 institutions of higher educationA Live Google Map
    5. 5. Who is aBonner?✤ A committed undergraduate— likely from a low-income background (85%+)✤ Joins a cohort-based program✤ Serves 8-10 hours every week, across four years✤ Interns with local, national and international organizations during the school year and full-time in summer✤ Participates in education, training, meetings, reflection✤ Is more likely to graduate and have better grades
    6. 6. The BonnerNetwork✤ 60 active Bonner Scholar and Leader Programs; 15 start-up✤ Diverse liberal arts institutions, public and private✤ 3,000+ students✤ Focus on under-represented students: low income, students of color, First Generation✤ 5,000+ alumni✤ 25 endowed campus programs at $163 million total
    7. 7. A proven program model... with elements to scale
    8. 8. ProvenProgram Model✤ Student learning, development and leadership✤ Reciprocal community partnerships and impact✤ Campus infrastructure and culture of service
    9. 9. Student ImpactLongitudinal assessment involving 25campus programs; pre and postassessment✤ Four years are significant✤ Proven skill learning (developmental model)✤ Commitment to social justice✤ Dialogue across difference✤ Structured and unstructured reflection✤ The importance of mentors✤ Civic-minded professionalism
    10. 10. DeepPartnerships✤ 910,620 hours of service in 2011✤ Developmental multi-year partnerships✤ Partners as co-educators✤ Connecting all available campus assets to community needs✤ Direct service, CBR, service- learning projects, policy research
    11. 11. CampusInfrastructure✤ Infrastructure for community service and academic community engagement✤ FIPSE funded model for civic engagement minors and certificates✤ Seeding community based research over 15 years at 30+ institutions✤ Staffing model that builds the capacity, range and depth of campus program
    12. 12. Alumni Impact30 campuses, 1066 Participants; 22-50years old; 32% response rate✤ 33% in non-profit sector careers✤ 32% in government careers✤ 25% in for-profit careers✤ Career choices driven by a desire to affect positive change✤ 90% demonstrating civic action in past 12 months ✤ joined organization; signed petition; did not buy a product due to company values; contacted a public official✤ 90% voted in last election
    13. 13. Bonner Alumni Remain Engagedvolunteering at notably higher rates than average U.S. citizens Average Volunteering Rates vs. Bonner Graduates 50 37.5 25 12.5 Average Citizen=26.3% 0 Average College Graduate=42.3% Bonner Graduates=49.2%
    14. 14. Where this idea came from... listening to our network
    15. 15. Origins of theInitiative✤ Vision—Aim to be at the cutting edge of institutional change✤ Data—NASCE✤ Learning—HIPs✤ Practice—HICEPs
    16. 16. Why change isneeded?✤ Higher education at a Crucible Moment✤ Financial challenges✤ Structural changes✤ Performance crisis✤ A unique opportunity
    17. 17. Data—NationalAssessment of Service &Community Engagement✤ Developed by Siena Research Institute as a gauge of institutional engagement✤ Implemented by 35+ institutions✤ 14K completes—now the largest national data set on civic engagement✤ Telling findings—more than half of students are never engaged✤ Average POP score - mid 20’s✤ Structure matters
    18. 18. Learning—AcademicCommunity Engagementat a Crossroads✤ Three Learn & Serve grants and fifteen years working on CBR (building for PolicyOptions)✤ FIPSE-funded civic engagement minor and certificate (like VESA)✤ Assessment points to the importance but limits of course-based service- learning✤ Broader calls in the field for the re- imagination of service-learning✤ The most successful initiatives (BTtoP, Greater Expectations) cross boundaries and inform institutional change
    19. 19. Engaged Learning—High Impact ~ first year seminarsPractices (HIPs) ~ common intellectual experiences  ~ learning communities  ~ writing-intensive courses✤ Generated from the Liberal ~collaborative assignments & projects  Education and America’s ~ undergraduate research Promise (LEAP) Initiative, a ~ diversity/global learning  project of the American Association of Colleges and ~ internships & project-based learning Universities (AAC&U) ~ service-learning & community-based learning✤ Proven to be effective with ~ capstone courses & projects higher than expected student learning and success, especially with under- represented students✤ ALL of them could be connected with community engagement
    20. 20. Practice—The Field isPushing Towards Results-Oriented Approaches✤ The recession and troubled economy has driven increased demand on non- profit and government organizations’ services✤ Shrinking public funding and declining revenues have contributed to tightening expenditures and cuts✤ Nonprofit mergers are increasing— driven not only by fiscal concerns but by aims to improve efficiency✤ Campus-community partnerships with long histories still need strategies and tools to measure their contribution and social impact
    21. 21. Practice—High ImpactCommunity EngagementPractices (HICEPs)✤ Developed by the Bonner Foundation and Network’s ~ developmental sustained partnerships 20+ years of building and ~ developmental multi-semester placements managing developmental ~ site and issue based teams campus-community partnerships ~ student team leaders ~ community listening / institutional voice✤ Position campus and community in democratic ~ capacity building projects (health index) engagement, characterized ~ community-based participatory research as: projects ✤ reciprocal ~ policy research assignments & issue briefs ~ research on proven program models ✤ problem-solving oriented ~cross campus collaborations on projects ✤ knowledge co-creation (i.e., Sophomore Exchange, Capstones) ✤ many types of public spaces
    22. 22. Bridging across frameworksA goal to draw out the opportunities for campuses and communities to be fully engaged
    23. 23. Our theory of change...strategic campus-community teams
    24. 24. High-Impact Strategic Goals✤ Scale proven best practices in community engagement by integrating them across the curriculum✤ Create more faculty participation in community engagement that is connected to evidence-based practice✤ Help campuses create and demonstrate community impact
    25. 25. Four Major Strategies✤ Integrate high-impact ✤ Build, support, and educational practices and leverage campus high-impact community transformation teams engagement ✤ Be an active convener✤ Use data and evidence- and catalyst for a national based practice to drive learning community— institutional strategy spurring partnerships towards full engagement across the field that move community engagement towards greater impact
    26. 26. Strategy 1Integrate high-impact educational practices and high-impact community engagement
    27. 27. Illustration of Connections First Year Seminars First Year Trips / Immersions Common Intellectual Experiences Site/Team Based Project Design Learning Communities Cohort Training Meetings Writing Intensive Courses Policy Research Assignments Collaborative Projects Issue Briefs/Program Models/CBR Undergraduate Research Capacity Building Projects Diversity /Global Learning Junior (Elective) Trips / Internships Sequence of developmental placements, Internships / Project-Based Learning tied to coursework Capstone Courses Capstone Service Projects
    28. 28. Strategy 2Use data and evidence-based practice to drive institutional strategy for full engagement
    29. 29. Types of Data NSEE Institutional learning performance NASCE Institution wide student engagement Survey of Community Partners Satisfaction; Capacity contributions Survey of Faculty Institution wide faculty engagement Strategic Planning Issue Briefs/Program Models/CBR Proven Program Models Capacity Building Projects Indicators (Public Data) Junior (Elective) Trips / Internships Community Impact Assessments to be gathered and shared
    30. 30. Year 4 on...continue to participation in Year 1 national learning community • Build team & Year 3 campus climate Student • Data collection & •Attend institute • Sustainability planning Professor Partner vision & plan • Identify assets • Refine HIcePs, projects Student • Attend institute Staff possibly others • Select & do first • Begin to HIceP Partner Professor implement impact Staff assessment Year 2 • Expand team & participation • Attend institute • Select & do next two HIcePs • Document and share learning (conferences,Strategy 3 publications)Build, support, and leverage campus transformation teams
    31. 31. Strategy 4Be an active convenerand catalyst for anational learningcommunity—spurringpartnerships acrossthe field that movecommunityengagement towardsgreater impactYear 1 Cohort
    32. 32. •Association of American Crucible Moment, HIPs Colleges and Universities • American Association of State Colleges & American Democracy Project Universities • Bringing Theory to Psychosocial Well-being, Assessment Practice Models • IARSLCE Research and theoretical base Collaboratories, faculty development • Imagining America paths, tenure & promotion Full Participation, institutional • NERCHE transformation, Carnegie Classification, Democratic Engagement • Open Indicators Community impact models using Consortium public data, open sourceStrategy 4National Learning Community
    33. 33. How you can be involved... supporters, champions, activists, critical thinkers...

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