NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11
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NSEE Conference Keynote 10-21-11

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Slides accompanying keynote presentation by Robert Hackett at 40th Anniversary Conference of the National Society for Experiential Education on 10/21/11 in Dallas, TX.

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  • \n
  • - Give my background\n * College\n * COOL\n * Bonner\n\n
  • - all the research shows student gains from experiential learning in terms of civic mindedness, retention, etc. \n- Clear best practices; Carnegie Classifications; magazine rankings\n- how many are members of a national association linked to this work (Compact?)\n
  • - all the research shows student gains from experiential learning in terms of civic mindedness, retention, etc. \n- Clear best practices; Carnegie Classifications; magazine rankings\n- how many are members of a national association linked to this work (Compact?)\n
  • - all the research shows student gains from experiential learning in terms of civic mindedness, retention, etc. \n- Clear best practices; Carnegie Classifications; magazine rankings\n- how many are members of a national association linked to this work (Compact?)\n
  • — L&S funding ended (largest single source of funding); FIPSE effectively ended, too; little national Foundation funding\n— used to be just a few — NSIEE (1971), then COOL (1984), then Campus Compact (1985)\n— now dozens of groups with overlapping but distinct agendas, diffusing attention but also impact\n— faculty promotion & tenure reward for engagement still eludes field\n
  • — L&S funding ended (largest single source of funding); FIPSE effectively ended, too; little national Foundation funding\n— used to be just a few — NSIEE (1971), then COOL (1984), then Campus Compact (1985)\n— now dozens of groups with overlapping but distinct agendas, diffusing attention but also impact\n— faculty promotion & tenure reward for engagement still eludes field\n
  • — L&S funding ended (largest single source of funding); FIPSE effectively ended, too; little national Foundation funding\n— used to be just a few — NSIEE (1971), then COOL (1984), then Campus Compact (1985)\n— now dozens of groups with overlapping but distinct agendas, diffusing attention but also impact\n— faculty promotion & tenure reward for engagement still eludes field\n
  • \n
  • — three areas of engagement, but only two ends for our work — student & community — with campus infrastructure a means\n— we’ve spent the majority of our attention on student impact and internal institutional change\n\n
  • — three areas of engagement, but only two ends for our work — student & community — with campus infrastructure a means\n— we’ve spent the majority of our attention on student impact and internal institutional change\n\n
  • — three areas of engagement, but only two ends for our work — student & community — with campus infrastructure a means\n— we’ve spent the majority of our attention on student impact and internal institutional change\n\n
  • — three areas of engagement, but only two ends for our work — student & community — with campus infrastructure a means\n— we’ve spent the majority of our attention on student impact and internal institutional change\n\n
  • — we need to do even more to impact more students since they are asking for it and our administrations want to give it to them\n— but, we also have to do more to help with community impact\n * higher poverty, environmental, global challenges than ever\n * non-profit and local government capacity needs are high (more demands, fewer resources....like us but much more severe)\n * plus, if you believe in the experiential model, we cannot achieve highest student outcomes without highest level of community engagement\n
  • — more demands on experiential education offices than ever — how to involve every student without dramatic increases in staffing or more rewards for faculty\n— how can higher education more effectively generate community impact\n
  • — more demands on experiential education offices than ever — how to involve every student without dramatic increases in staffing or more rewards for faculty\n— how can higher education more effectively generate community impact\n
  • — This is the big question\n— I have three recommendations or strategies to recommend\n— These represent the Bonner Foundation’s primary focus and vision for the future\n* we’re in this, too\n* and we share every resource, lesson learned on our website\n* invite you to contact us/me directly if you think we can help you somehow\n
  • — tell COOL story to indicate where I learned this to be true\n
  • — students want to make a difference\n— K-12 has had a tremendous impact on experience level and interest of entering college students to serve\n— still largely dis-engaged, dis-enchanted with politics\n— but are interested in policy when framed as finding what works\n
  • — Bonner common commitments were developed with help of our students\n— further define, focus them as citizens and individuals\n
  • — idealism alone isn’t going to work\n— we need to provide avenues for student engagement\n— when schools started hire “Green Deans”, etc. student service rose dramatically\n— especially on campuses where students were asked to play a leadership role in leading other students\n
  • — this is lessons of the Bonner experience\n— everyone has the Federal Work-Study to support this \n— many also do or could tap into part-time AmeriCorps funding via Ed Award Only\n
  • — our data shows this\n* Bonner Student Impact Survey shows even stronger results, including life-long engagement\n— email from Rhodes graduate now Assistant Dean of Students at Sewanee\n
  • — Newsweek Rankings: Bonner 7 of top 10 and 10 of top 25\n— expanded centers\n— expanded student & faulty engagement\n— key: lots of students\n— Example: Bonners manage TNCJ freshmen service requirement for 1200 students via CEL Days\n& now upperclass experience CEL 2\n
  • — community partnerships re-defined \n* from episodic, one-time or one-semester engagement \n* to sustained, students as staff\n— longer-term, multi-level engagement\n— give Elijah’s Promise example\n
  • — most complicated recommendation\n— area with the most need for experimentation\n
  • — original challenge of coordination from COOL days is still with us because so many more people are mobilized\n— we have to look hard at what we’re good at (we’re not social service providing organizations)\n— we have to reach out to likely and perhaps unlikely partners\n
  • — original challenge of coordination from COOL days is still with us because so many more people are mobilized\n— we have to look hard at what we’re good at (we’re not social service providing organizations)\n— we have to reach out to likely and perhaps unlikely partners\n
  • — original challenge of coordination from COOL days is still with us because so many more people are mobilized\n— we have to look hard at what we’re good at (we’re not social service providing organizations)\n— we have to reach out to likely and perhaps unlikely partners\n
  • — example: Spelman focusing on 1.7 mile radius\n— we need internships to be more strategically integrated into these partnerships\n— new model: experimenting with integrating these partnerships into 5 high impact practices\n
  • — example: Spelman focusing on 1.7 mile radius\n— we need internships to be more strategically integrated into these partnerships\n— new model: experimenting with integrating these partnerships into 5 high impact practices\n
  • — example: Spelman focusing on 1.7 mile radius\n— we need internships to be more strategically integrated into these partnerships\n— new model: experimenting with integrating these partnerships into 5 high impact practices\n
  • — tap into teaching, research & service (we can all be a “land grant”)\n* faculty, school name on research used in agency grant proposals adds tremendous credibility\n— done well mobilizing community-based research, but can do more \n* PoilicyOptions initiative\n— should move from just 1x policy events to supporting local groups on-going deliberation\n* Princeton achievement gap example \n— can also leverage extensive campus network of relationships\n* technology savvy, esp to support social-change networking (using social media)\n
  • — tap into teaching, research & service (we can all be a “land grant”)\n* faculty, school name on research used in agency grant proposals adds tremendous credibility\n— done well mobilizing community-based research, but can do more \n* PoilicyOptions initiative\n— should move from just 1x policy events to supporting local groups on-going deliberation\n* Princeton achievement gap example \n— can also leverage extensive campus network of relationships\n* technology savvy, esp to support social-change networking (using social media)\n
  • — tap into teaching, research & service (we can all be a “land grant”)\n* faculty, school name on research used in agency grant proposals adds tremendous credibility\n— done well mobilizing community-based research, but can do more \n* PoilicyOptions initiative\n— should move from just 1x policy events to supporting local groups on-going deliberation\n* Princeton achievement gap example \n— can also leverage extensive campus network of relationships\n* technology savvy, esp to support social-change networking (using social media)\n
  • — we need to speak with local & state government, elected leaders | coalitions of groups\n— we need to identify state-level partners who work in our communities (e.g., NJ Hunger Coalition)\n* urge your state Campus Compact to help with this\n— new funding for campus outreach will come from issue-driven, problem-solving initiatives\n* we will often be junior partner in grant proposal (e.g., Trenton Prevention Board)\n
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