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Issueto Impact
Issueto Impact
Issueto Impact
Issueto Impact
Issueto Impact
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Issueto Impact

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  • 1. TAKING SERVICE TO THE NEXT LEVEL: ISSUES TO IMPACT
  • 2. OUR WORK AS A MOVEMENT Bonner Programs at 80+ colleges Each engages 10-100 students Each sustains10-100 community partners We work across common issues to make a difference
  • 3. THE BONNER BIG PICTURE Bonner Scholars and Leaders did 284,165 hours of community service in 2008-2009 We worked in schools, shelters, soup kitchens, parks, art centers, youth centers, and many other non-profits How did we collectively make a difference?
  • 4. PRESSING, COMPLEX ISSUES Arts and Culture Community & Economic Development Education - Early, Elementary, Middle, High School, Adult, and ESL Environment Global Issues & Diversity Health Homelessness and Hunger Immigration and Refugees Violence Prevention & Criminal Justice Youth Development
  • 5. ISSUE TO IMPACT Public Education & Political Engagement Community Service Action Issue Education/ Capacity Awareness Building (Forums) (Trainings/Planning) Focusing on an Issue, Place, Organization Research Policy Analysis/ Issue Briefs Local Information (PolicyOptions.org) (PolicyOptions.org) Community-Based Research/Academic Service-Learning
  • 6. HOW CAN WE ORGANIZE & MOBILIZE CHANGE? Bonners & Clubs & Committed Organizations Volunteers Faculty & Administrators Partners, Departments & Institutional (and Alumni Resources & Families)
  • 7. BONNERS CAN MOVE FROM ISSUE TO IMPACT Advocacy Present research to School Board & City Council Forum Help organize public forum on school lunches Issue Brief Research and write “Farm-to-School” PolicyOptions Brief Research Focus paper on nutrition; produce nutrition recommendations Training Connect students & staff to relevant workshops Summer Intern with Campus Kitchens in D.C. Team Organize Local Farm-to-School Service Team Regular Coach School Gardens club 2x each week 1x Orientation service working in school garden
  • 8. CAMPUSES CAN BEING TO FOSTER LONG-TERM IMPACT Advocacy Students are trained & organize local strategies Forum Issue-based teams link to classes to offer series Issue Brief Collection of Issue Briefs online (PolicyOptions) Research Full-time staff matchmake for CBR requests Training Workshop series (non-profit partners) Summer Local and national/international internships Team 8-15 Issue-Based Service Teams Meet (weekly) Regular Semester long placements, Clearinghouse (Wiki) 1x Orientation & One-day service projects
  • 9. ENVISION YOUR ISSUE Advocacy Forum Issue Brief Research Training Summer Team Regular 1x
  • 10. LET’S BRAINSTORM & SHARE Bonners & Community Faculty & Committed Partners Departments Volunteers Who could your team engage?
  • 11. STRATEGY #1 - GETTING PARTNERS ON BOARD What are the components of a strong issue-based team? • PLAN • DEVELOPMENTAL POSITIONS • LEADERSHIP • COMMUNICATION What are the steps?
  • 12. ENGAGING PARTNERS: EXAMPLES The College of New Jersey (on the wiki at http://tcnjbonner.pbworks.com/FrontPage) 1. Site Visits by staff 2. Retreat with students 3. Team-based planning with community partner 4. Documentation/Sharing - wiki (see http://bonnernetwork.pbworks.com/Using-Social-Media-Tools) 5. Evolution of team roles 6. Regular team meetings with partner
  • 13. ENGAGING PARTNERS: EXAMPLES Carson-Newman College (on the wiki at http://cnbonner.pbworks.com/) 1. Identifying strong partners 2. Piloting first-year placement change 3. Strategy sessions with individual site 4. Student summer internship to develop capacity 5. Working on change for rest of program
  • 14. ENGAGING PARTNERS: EXAMPLES Stetson University (on the wiki at http://sliplanning.pbworks.com/ and http://stetsonbonner.pbworks.com/) 1. Organized students into teams to plan Summer Leadership Institute 2009 2. Each team had an issue, partner(s), & asset map 3. Developed plan with similar goals (workshop, faculty member, service project, long-term plan) 4. Issue Team focus continued into this school year
  • 15. RESOURCES TO ENGAGE PARTNERS Toolkit (on the wiki at http://bonnernetwork.pbworks.com/Community- Partners-and-Impact) Brochure Workbook Planning Guide Power-Point for Strategy Session (on the wiki at http://bonnernetwork.pbworks.com/Community- Partners-and-Impact) Help for Explaining CBR (see www.cbr.net) Examples from Real Partners (see www.princeton.edu/cbli)
  • 16. STRATEGY #1 - GETTING PARTNERS ON BOARD What could be partners’ challenges with this idea and its implementation? What can you do to respond to them?
  • 17. GETTING PARTNERS ON BOARD Solutions Problems Team takes ownership - Small / struggling coalition-building non-profits More engaging positions Lack of resources/ capacity Retreats/planning meetings Disorganization/ Leadership Roles need for planning Summer Internships
  • 18. TEAM BRAINSTORMING- STEPS & DATES 1. Conversations with sites to define vision & goals 2. Planning sessions to define positions, service opportunities, research, etc. 3. Define structure and roles 4. Define training needs 5. Define structure & meetings
  • 19. TEAM BRAINSTORMING- STEPS & DATES 1. Conversations with sites to define vision & goals • Who • When 2. Planning sessions to define positions, service opportunities, research, etc. • How • When 3. Define structure and roles • Thoughts 4. Define training needs • Topics • Faculty/Partner role • When 5. Define structure & meetings • Frequency • Basics
  • 20. STRATEGY #2 - GETTING FACULTY CONNECTED What are the roles for faculty in this initiative? What are professors’ challenges with this idea and its implementation? What can you do to respond to them?
  • 21. BONNERS CAN MOVE FROM ISSUE TO IMPACT Advocacy Present research to School Board & City Council Forum Help organize public forum on school lunches Issue Brief Research and write “Farm-to-School” PolicyOptions Brief Research Focus paper on nutrition; produce nutrition recommendations Training Connect students & staff to relevant workshops Summer Intern with Campus Kitchens in D.C. Team Organize Local Farm-to-School Service Team Regular Coach School Gardens club 2x each week 1x Orientation service working in school garden
  • 22. GETTING FACULTY CONNECTED Solutions Problems Know what they’re Not involved in trying to teach service Individualized proposals & No/little familiarity with requests CBR/service-learning Take on logistical work Negative Leadership roles (TAs, experiences reflection leaders, etc.) Lack of time/value/ Appeal to their rewards interests
  • 23. ENGAGING FACULTY: EXAMPLES The College of New Jersey (on the wiki at http://tcnjbonner.pbworks.com/FrontPage) 1. Find the right ones 2. Meet with them individually 3. Organizing around a real project - CEL Days, Issue Briefs 4. Sharing resources as needed 5. Faculty connections to issue teams
  • 24. RESOURCES TO ENGAGE FACULTY Basic Knowledge (on the wiki at http://bonnernetwork.pbworks.com/Community- Partners-and-Impact) Academic Connections Community Based Research Policy Options Help for Explaining CBR (see http://cbrnet.pbworks.com/Resources-for-Faculty) Examples from Real Partners (see www.princeton.edu/cbli) Campus Compact
  • 25. TEAM BRAINSTORMING - ENGAGING FACULTY 1. Who do you know? 2. What could they do?
  • 26. STRATEGY #3 - RESEARCH ON THE ISSUE This is where issue coalition - your partner, professor, and your work might come together.
  • 27. FIRST, MAP WHAT’S HAPPENING ON CAMPUS Campus Profile Types of Service Academic Work Education & Training Campus & Organizational Capacity Building Research, Policy Analysis & Deliberative Democracy
  • 28. NEXT, ANALYZE THE PUBLIC POLICY ON THE ISSUE Eventually 2-4 pages: Topic/Goal Scope of the Problem Past Policy Current Policy Tree of alternatives or policy options Listing of key organizations and individuals Glossary Bibliography/Sources
  • 29. WHAT IS AN ISSUE BRIEF? A short document that describes an issue or topic in terms of its potential policy solutions or program models • neutral • localized (to national) What else can come from this research? • recommendations • videos • program changes • research for funding • workshops • forums
  • 30. EXAMPLES Chronic homelessness: what policies and models are most effective at transitioning individuals from being homeless to having homes? Achievement gap: what policies and models help reduce the educational gap among different socioeconomic groups? Health care: what policies and models will provide the highest-quality, most affordable health care to the most
  • 31. WHAT IS AN ISSUE BRIEF? A short document that describes an issue or topic in terms of its potential policy solutions or program models • neutral • localized (to national) What else can come from this research? • recommendations • videos • program changes • research for funding • workshops • forums
  • 32. ISSUE VIDEOS
  • 33. WHAT RESEARCH TO DO Who to Consult Community Partners & Experts Professors & academic departments City and local government Phone calls & interviews with topic experts Sources of Information  Interviews  Internet Searches  Library Research Keep a Bibliography  Face-to-face meetings on and off campus
  • 34. NEXT, FOCUS IN ON ONE ISSUE & TOPIC The Topic: Real It matters to someone (a partner, agency, Forum or Town Meeting Improving a Program individual or group) Use feedback Besides the issue brief, what will be the products? Public Education or Advocacy Developing a Proposal
  • 35. SO NOW WHAT? Let’s share questions, ideas, strategies.... which issues to focus on how to move forward how to structure this semester what to do this summer more...
  • 36. USING A WIKI: YOUR TEAM WORK Wiki: interactive web-page (you can edit) Agency Name & Contact Info Mission/Vision Program Descriptions Map/Location Volunteer Positions Videos & More
  • 37. A simple profile introduces your site. Students create, access, & update.
  • 38. This is a typical program wiki...
  • 39. A Campus-Wide Wiki can help with outreach, listing volunteer opportunities at your site.
  • 40. The Wiki can introduce students to important information about the neighborhood. Here students did community asset mapping to create videos and then mapped partners.
  • 41. The wiki can be a tool for students at your site to do planning & better work (setting goals, charting progress).
  • 42. You can join the Bonner Network Wiki to learn more & connect to other uses.
  • 43. WHERE TO LEARN MORE Bonner Network Wiki (http:// bonnernetwork.pbwiki.com) Serve 2.0 Resource Wiki (http:// serve.pbwiki.com/) Bonner Foundation (www.bonner.org) PolicyOptions Wiki (http:// policyoptions.pbworks.com)

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