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Integrating High-Impact Practices                  A presentation and all-staff discussion at the                 Bonner F...
What We’ll Cover•A Crucible Moment: discussion•Why we want to do this•Your thoughts and broad hopes•Round Robins on High-I...
High-Impact Practice Research High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matte...
First Year SeminarsThe best involve critical inquiry,frequent writing, information literacy,collaborative learning, and ot...
Reflecting on Last Year•Partner Developmental Model Session•Desire to be more connected to the National Movement and Conver...
Partner Development•Asked you to think about the levelsof partnership
Intro to National Conversations     •AACU      Crucible Moment, HIPs     •AASCU     American Democracy Project            ...
Intro to National Conversations                    Collaboratories, faculty      •Imagining    development paths,       Am...
Where is the movement?http://americandemocracy.illinoisstate.edu/documents/democratic-engagement-white-paper-2_13_09.pdf
A Framework
Discussion•Where in your Bonner Program’s andcampus work is your practiceillustrative of technocraticengagement?•Where in ...
Discussion•Where do you believe the typologyor interrelationship betweentechnocratic and democraticengagement is more fluid...
Other Frameworks•Sockett’s Typology of Partnerships (1997)•Ven de Ven’s Engaged Scholarship Diamond Model (2007)•Relations...
Sockett’s Typology of Partnerships (1997)•Transactional — fixed task, fixed time•Exchange — trading knowledge and expertise ...
Ven de Ven’s Engaged ScholarshipDiamond Model (2007)
Relationships Continuum based on article Partnerships in Service-Learning and Civic Engagement, by Bringle, R.G., Clayton,...
Strategic Partner Model                Exemplary          Engaged     EmergingExploratory
Partner Developmental Democratic Engagement                           Exemplary                                           ...
Exploratory Strategic Partnerships•Understand the developmental model•Interest in multi-year commitment•Some regular Bonne...
Emerging Strategic Partnerships•all of exploratory plus...•A multi-year partnership plan•A team of students with distinct ...
Engaged Strategic Partnerships•all of emerging plus...•A schedule of ongoing evaluation and revision of the multi-year par...
Exemplary Strategic Partnerships•all of engaged plus...•Ongoing long-term plan•Annual reporting related to ongoing plan•Bo...
Moving partners through levels...•What resources do campus programs want to assist with this?•Resource Brainstorm and Shar...
Exploratory Strategic Partnerships•  Conduct some research and information gathering about the community and scout out its...
Emerging Strategic Partnerships• Listen well and evaluate the relationship and partnership• Re-evaluate the needs and offe...
Engaged Strategic Partnerships•  Ensure that there is interest in continuing the relationship and that both parties see it...
Exemplary Strategic Partnerships•  Realistically assess progress on mutual agreements (e.g., how is the service going, how...
Moving partners through levels...•What resources do campus programs want to assist with this?•Resource Brainstorm and Shar...
Integrating High-Impact Practices                  A presentation and all-staff discussion at the                 Bonner F...
High-Impact Focus•Team-based model for institutional change•Three year program and summer institutes•Linking high-impact c...
Next Steps•Presidential commitment•Winter planning retreat•Summer institute (June 26-30)•Campus-based strategic planning a...
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Integrating High-Impact Practices

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This presentation and all staff (125+) member conversation by the Bonner Network involved exploring how higher education service programs can strategically link community engagement with high-impact learning practices. This session gave staff the opportunity to share their own campus examples of high-impact practices such as first year seminars, learning communities, core curriculum, writing intensive courses, internships, global immersions, undergraduate research, and capstones. This session occurred at the Bonner Foundation's Fall Directors Meeting 2011. For more info see bonnernetwork.pbworks.com

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  • Transcript of "Integrating High-Impact Practices"

    1. 1. Integrating High-Impact Practices A presentation and all-staff discussion at the Bonner Foundation’s Fall Directors Meeting 2011Fourth Year Capstone Placement Capstone / ResearchThird Year International Service Global Learning Internships Undergraduate ResearchSecond Year Core Curriculum/ Sophomore Exchange Service Learning HIP Summer Learning CommunityFirst Year Trip First Year Seminar Cohort meetings First Year Seminar/ Learning Community
    2. 2. What We’ll Cover•A Crucible Moment: discussion•Why we want to do this•Your thoughts and broad hopes•Round Robins on High-ImpactPractices
    3. 3. High-Impact Practice Research High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter•George Kuh, 2008
    4. 4. First Year SeminarsThe best involve critical inquiry,frequent writing, information literacy,collaborative learning, and other skillsthat develop students intellectual andpractical competencies. First-yearseminars can also involve students withcutting-edge questions in scholarshipand with faculty members ownresearch.
    5. 5. Reflecting on Last Year•Partner Developmental Model Session•Desire to be more connected to the National Movement and Conversation•
    6. 6. Partner Development•Asked you to think about the levelsof partnership
    7. 7. Intro to National Conversations •AACU Crucible Moment, HIPs •AASCU American Democracy Project Psychosocial Well-being, •BTtoP Assessment Models Research and theoretical •IARSLCE base
    8. 8. Intro to National Conversations Collaboratories, faculty •Imagining development paths, America tenure & promotion Full Participation, institutional •NERCHE transformation, Carnegie Classification •Open Community impact Indicators models using public data, Consortium open source
    9. 9. Where is the movement?http://americandemocracy.illinoisstate.edu/documents/democratic-engagement-white-paper-2_13_09.pdf
    10. 10. A Framework
    11. 11. Discussion•Where in your Bonner Program’s andcampus work is your practiceillustrative of technocraticengagement?•Where in your Bonner Program’s andcampus work is your practiceillustrative of democratic engagement?
    12. 12. Discussion•Where do you believe the typologyor interrelationship betweentechnocratic and democraticengagement is more fluid or shouldbe challenged or refined?•How do you believe that the BonnerNetwork can contribute to thisnational conversation?
    13. 13. Other Frameworks•Sockett’s Typology of Partnerships (1997)•Ven de Ven’s Engaged Scholarship Diamond Model (2007)•Relationship Continuum (2009)•SOFAR: A Structural Framework for Partnerships in Service-Learning and Civic Engagement (2009)
    14. 14. Sockett’s Typology of Partnerships (1997)•Transactional — fixed task, fixed time•Exchange — trading knowledge and expertise for mutual benefit•Cooperative — planning together and sharing responsibilities•System / Transformative — each partner is transformed and becomes interdependent All are legitimate forms of engagement Each builds upon the other, and some partnerships may include multiple forms.
    15. 15. Ven de Ven’s Engaged ScholarshipDiamond Model (2007)
    16. 16. Relationships Continuum based on article Partnerships in Service-Learning and Civic Engagement, by Bringle, R.G., Clayton, P.H., and Price, M.F. (2009) Transformational Synergistic Integration of goals Working with shared resources Working for common goals Planning and formalized leadership Coordination of activities with each other Communication with each other Unilateral awarenessUnaware of other person
    17. 17. Strategic Partner Model Exemplary Engaged EmergingExploratory
    18. 18. Partner Developmental Democratic Engagement Exemplary Reciprocal! Ongoing development & evaluation of vision, planning, and capacity building High-impact integration Engaged Co-created strategic vision and plan Multi-year commitments Team with multiple positions Various types of engagement Emerging Multi-year agreements and placements Positions at multiple levels Exploration of academic connectionsExploratory Technocratic EngagementShort-term & one-year placements
    19. 19. Exploratory Strategic Partnerships•Understand the developmental model•Interest in multi-year commitment•Some regular Bonner placements or academic community engagement project•Have provided necessary documentation•Primary points of contact•Center staff can articulate overlap of goals with program’s work•Training provided by center
    20. 20. Emerging Strategic Partnerships•all of exploratory plus...•A multi-year partnership plan•A team of students with distinct levels•Development of academic community engagement•Agency staff participate in on-campus activities•Training is shared by center and agency
    21. 21. Engaged Strategic Partnerships•all of emerging plus...•A schedule of ongoing evaluation and revision of the multi-year partnership plan•team with at least three students (Bonners) with clear leadership roles•Center has inventoried academic engagement projects and supported ongoing project involved team and faculty•Agency staff participate in on-campus activities and identifies self as part of center•Training provided by partner for students
    22. 22. Exemplary Strategic Partnerships•all of engaged plus...•Ongoing long-term plan•Annual reporting related to ongoing plan•Bonner team leaders and upper class students play important roles in academic community engagement projects (each sem)•Students assist with program management•Agency point of contact & center staff networking opportunities•At least one high-impact practice
    23. 23. Moving partners through levels...•What resources do campus programs want to assist with this?•Resource Brainstorm and Sharing
    24. 24. Exploratory Strategic Partnerships•  Conduct some research and information gathering about the community and scout out its non-profit organizations & key leaders (who should we be working with?)•  Assess the community in terms of location and transportation; what is accessible and feasiblefor potential student volunteers•  Assess the community in terms of its needs (issue areas) and assets (individual leaders,community strengths); match those to the resources or roles that student volunteers can provide•  Have open conversations with partner representatives; focus on building the relationship withtrust and by responding to partners’ requests with a good process•  Provide a basic orientation and training to the partners (e.g., what to expect of volunteers,how to manage volunteers)•  Explain what the program is and offer a menu of resources and services•  Explain and attempt to provide with related capacity-building opportunities, such as funds andgrant-seeking•  Identify and track the needs and interests of campus volunteers for the partner (students andfaculty)•  Communicate clear expectations about the partnership, identifying its goals and how successwill be measured•  Capture these understandings in a written way if possible (e.g. partner application, MOU)
    25. 25. Emerging Strategic Partnerships• Listen well and evaluate the relationship and partnership• Re-evaluate the needs and offers of each party (campus and organization)• Review what has been accomplished through the partnership and how it is going• Begin to discuss higher level activities (such as academic connections, more complexplacements)• Move from open conversation to drafting longer-range goals and a sustainability plan•  Connect the partner with other, more mature partners (mentorship, capacity sharing)• Reach out to faculty members and help the organization develop academic connections &projects• Plan and run meetings, detailed planning processes, and an evaluation strategy for thepartnership and its components• Identify what other resources and capacities the organization needs (e.g., types of studentpositions, technology needs)• Identify and link organizations who can help or build each other with each other; help theorganization connect to other college resources as well• Further clarify the expectations and scope of the relationship
    26. 26. Engaged Strategic Partnerships•  Ensure that there is interest in continuing the relationship and that both parties see it as reciprocal andtrusting•  Evaluate the structure and frequency of communication; make sure that there is open communication•  Explore what more the campus-community partnership could be doing (e.g., additional types of positions,academic connections)•  Arrange for and/or provide education and training to the partner about what are the options to expandor enhance the partnership (e.g., if the partner is interested in CBR, staff may still need to learn aboutexamples and roles)•  Conduct a more systematic community needs and assets mapping•  Campus representatives need to enhance their commitment to the organization and neighborhoodthrough additional roles (e.g., showing up at meetings, participating on boards, providing funds)•  Forge organization and campus buy-in to a common vision and set of goals for the partnership•  Create written agreements (e.g., memorandum of understanding, annual strategic plan) for thepartnership•  Re-evaluate and adjust individual positions and placements so that they contribute to this longer-rangeplan and capacity of the organization and its programs•  Identify and/or train more capable/higher-level student volunteers or others to help take on theseexpanding roles
    27. 27. Exemplary Strategic Partnerships•  Realistically assess progress on mutual agreements (e.g., how is the service going, how is academicproject going)•  At this point, both campus and partner should understand there is more forgiveness for trial anderror (e.g., a volunteer who might not work out, a faculty project that doesn’t go according to plan)•  Help provide or link the organization with adequate funding and resources to carry out the plansand projects delineated in the partnership•  Makes sure that the organization can engage and support a student leader to take on morecomplex work and capacity-building projects•  Support and provide opportunities for partner representatives to serve as co-educators (at the siteand on campus, for example in meetings and courses)•  Ensure that the organization’s emerging volunteer needs and ability to engage volunteers atmultiple levels are being met, for instance by establishing a team and site coordinator•  Provide additional staffing support (e.g, a connection to an experienced student leader or VISTA)to the site’s enhanced volunteer engagement•  Seek out, explain, and support additional dimensions to work, such as research and policy researchprojects•  Provide education and information to the partner to participate in these research projects•  Help the site initiate new programs or changes in existing programs, as a result of the expandedcapacity.
    28. 28. Moving partners through levels...•What resources do campus programs want to assist with this?•Resource Brainstorm and Sharing
    29. 29. Integrating High-Impact Practices A presentation and all-staff discussion at the Bonner Foundation’s Fall Directors Meeting 2011Fourth Year Capstone Placement Capstone / ResearchThird Year International Service Global Learning Internships Undergraduate ResearchSecond Year Core Curriculum/ Sophomore Exchange Service Learning HIP Summer Learning CommunityFirst Year Trip First Year Seminar Cohort meetings First Year Seminar/ Learning Community
    30. 30. High-Impact Focus•Team-based model for institutional change•Three year program and summer institutes•Linking high-impact community engagement & learning across curriculum•National learning community
    31. 31. Next Steps•Presidential commitment•Winter planning retreat•Summer institute (June 26-30)•Campus-based strategic planning and implementation• For more information: contact Ariane Hoy (ahoy@bonner.org), Robert Hackett (rhackett@bonner.org) or Mathew Johnson mjohnson@siena.edu)
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