Bonner High-Impact Initiative: Being Architects and Leaders of Change

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Bonner High-Impact Initiative: Being Architects and Leaders of Change: an overview of key aspects of the process, especially for team leaders and teams.

Bonner High-Impact Initiative: Being Architects and Leaders of Change: an overview of key aspects of the process, especially for team leaders and teams.

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  • 1. Being Architects and Leaders for Institutional and Community Change Building a national learning community
  • 2. A Theory of Change
  • 3. Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American communities and our nation (and world) by increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals, organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Key Recommendations (A Crucible Moment p.31) 1. Foster civic ethos across all parts of the campus and educational culture. 2. Make civic literacy a core expectation for all students. 3. Practice civic inquiry across all fields of study. 4. Advance civic action through transformative partnerships, at home and abroad. Goal 3
  • 4. Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American communities and our nation (and world) by increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals, organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Strategy Three-Year Cohort Based Model to: 1. Develop Staff 2. Build National Learning Community 3. Use Data and Measure Impact 4. Scale the HICEPs 5. Catalyze Campus Change 6. Support Community Change Goal 4
  • 5. Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American communities and our nation (and world) by increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals, organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Tactics Strategy 1. Build & support Transformation Teams 2. Deploy the NASCE on all campuses 3. Facilitate strategic planning gatherings 4. Create a series of meetings, gatherings, and projects that move the work forward on an annual basis. 5. Support work of Transformation Teams through calls, visits, resource generation, and accountability checkins. Goal 5
  • 6. Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American communities and our nation (and world) by increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals, organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Events Tactics Strategy Goal 1. NASCE & survey administration on your campus. 2. Strategic Planning sessions on your campus. 3. Inventory, Team Organization, Presidential Buy-in by your campus. 4. Spring Planning Retreat in Princeton. 5. Follow-up post-retreat planning on your campus. 6. Summer Leadership Institute Faculty Track at Carson-Newman. 7. Summer High Impact Institute in June at Siena. 8. Fall Director’s Meeting in November at Kanuga. 9. President/Provost/Dean retreats TBD. 10.Planning Retreat 2.0 in Spring 2013 (today) 6
  • 7. Toolkit for Change
  • 8. Challenge and Change Six core challenges that “lie at the core of the innovative disruption facing higher education” including: • University Model • Structural Model • Funding Model • Cost Model • Business Model • Success Model” (Mehaffy, 2012, p. 26)
  • 9. Challenge and Change • an outmoded university model drew on an 11thcentury calendar and operates on a 19th-century calendar with its emphasis on passive delivery of content and 15-week semesters. • declining (direct) federal and state support, which in FY 2012 experienced the largest decrease in 50 years. • Costs are rising. From 1988 to 2008 when the consumer price index increased 75 percent, tuition for public 4-year institutions rose 325 percent. • Privatization—especially the perception that institutions “operate like a business” is increasing.
  • 10. Challenge and Change Seven key areas of ‘rapid change’ including: • new players (Lumina, Gates, philanthopy) • college models (for-profit, free) • course models (blended, online, flipped, MOOCs) • data and learning analytics (can inform learning) • new cost structures (shared courses, open source) • new ways of measuring success (impact) • threats to the credential (Degree Qualification Profile)
  • 11. Full Participation • This paper grew out of a realization by each of the authors (and the organizations they represent) that the long-term success of diversity, public engagement, and student success initiatives requires that these efforts become more fully integrated and that their larger institutional settings undergo transformation.
  • 12. Full Participation Campus must do the following, understanding the links of civic and diversity: • Increasing student access and success, particularly for underrepresented, first-generation, and low-income students; • Diversifying higher education faculties, often with separate projects for hiring, retention, and climate; • Promoting community, civic, or public engagement for students; and, • Increasing support for faculty’s public or engaged scholarship.
  • 13. Democratic Community Engagement Wingspread Conference participants on civic engagement in higher education: • While the movement has created some change, it has also plateaued and requires a more comprehensive effort to ensure lasting commitment and institutional capacity. • “Calling the question” of whether engagement will be viewed as a core value of the university of the 21st century – as centrally important to the civic mission of higher education and to generating and transmitting new knowledge • The concern is that “engagement has not become the defining characteristic of higher education's mission nor has it been embraced across disciplines, departments and institutions.” • “Few institutions have made the significant, sustainable, structural reforms that will result in an academic culture that values community engagement as a core function of the institution.”
  • 14. Democratic Community Engagement
  • 15. Community Change This process is also about acknowledging how change happens in communities and the power dynamics between institutions and organizations. • Institutional leaders frequently express the intent of including everyday resident leaders in their designs...Citizens may be sought for their “input” into these straetgic planning efforts, and later they are enlisted to endorse the plan, but they seldom have real authority in deciding what the plan will be. ~ Byron White.
  • 16. Community Change • To community partners and most people in the every day work world the notion of tenure is a privileged, exclusive entitlement and guarantee of a job. To community partners who may be farmers or construction workers who have jobs dependent on weather and changing economic conditions, or others who have no assurance that they will have their job from day to day, it seems preposterous. At first, in most community- university partnerships, the community partners do not care at all about promotion and tenure, let alone the processes and procedures involved in accomplishing these advancements. However, as the relationships grow in trust and possibility, the community partner comes to care that they can count on their faculty partner continuing to have a place, and hopefully a place of influence, within the institution. ~ Elmer Freeman, Susan Gust, and Deborah Aloshen
  • 17. Community Change
  • 18. Perspectives... Jame Johnson Co-Leader of the Allegheny Team
  • 19. Envision... What will this really look like when you come in June?
  • 20. Take two... Integrated Deep Developmental Pervasive Think again about what this means.