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Bonner High Impact at Stetson
 

Bonner High Impact at Stetson

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Discussion with faculty and administration on Friday, March 30, 2012.

Discussion with faculty and administration on Friday, March 30, 2012.

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    Bonner High Impact at Stetson Bonner High Impact at Stetson Presentation Transcript

    • The Bonner High-Impact Initiative 1
    • We hope to build a nationallearning communityamongst the participatinginstitutions and partners 2
    • Introductions... what brings you here today?
    • Where this idea came from... listening to our network
    • Origins of theInitiative✤ Staff Development✤ Partner Development✤ Campus Change✤ Data ✤ Student Impact ✤ NASCE
    • Student ImpactLongitudinal assessment involving 25campus programs; pre and postassessment✤ Four years are significant✤ Proven skill learning (developmental model)✤ Commitment to social justice✤ Dialogue across difference✤ Structured and unstructured reflection✤ The importance of mentors✤ Civic-minded professionalism
    • Data—NationalAssessment of Service &Community Engagement✤ Developed by Siena Research Institute as a gauge of institutional engagement✤ Implemented by 35+ institutions✤ 14K completes—now the largest national data set on civic engagement✤ Telling findings—more than half of students are never engaged✤ Average POP score - mid 20’s✤ Structure matters
    • Unrealized Potential in Higher Education: NASCE 8
    • Origins of theInitiative✤ History of work on academic connections— ✤ CBR ✤ FIPSE ✤ AAC&U✤ Vision—to be on cutting edge
    • Change in HigherEducation✤ Financial challenges✤ Structural changes✤ Performance crisis✤ Higher education at a Crucible Moment 10
    • Change in the Non-Profit Sector✤ Increased demand✤ Shrinking resources✤ Increasing non-profit mergers✤ Campus-community partnerships need strategies and tools to measure their contribution and social impact 11
    • Engaged Learning—A Part ofthe Solution•Generated from the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) Initiative, a project of the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U)•Proven to be effective with higher than expected student learning and success, especially with under-represented students•All of them can connect with community engagement 12
    • Engaged Learning—High ImpactPractices (HIPs) ~ first year seminars ~ common intellectual experiences  ~ place-based education ~ learning communities  ~ writing-intensive courses ~collaborative assignments & projects  ~ undergraduate research ~ diversity/global learning  ~ internships & project-based learning ~ service-learning & community-based learning ~ capstone courses & projects 13
    • Three Guiding Principles Pervasiveness Depth Integration 14
    • II IV HighDeep Low I III Low High Pervasive [Saltmarsh & Clayton. (2011). Adapted from Eckel et al (1998).] [Graphic by K. Buchner]
    • low ed3-Dimensional at gr Model te In high high II IV (“Johnson Cube”) VI VIII [Saltmarsh & Clayton (2011)] Deep [Graphic by K. Buchner] I III V VII low low Pervasive high
    • Engaged Practice—High ImpactCommunity Engagement Practice(HICEPs)1. PLACE 7. REFLECTION2. HUMILITY 8. MENTOR3. INTEGRATION 9. LEARNING4. DEPTH 10.CAPACITY4. DEVELOPMENT5. SEQUENCE 11.EVIDENCE6. TEAM 12.IMPACT 17
    • High-Impact Initiative Vision✤ We envision the transformation of higher education to more fully embrace their public purposes.✤ We envision the transformation of organizational partners and communities through the thoughtful engagement of civic agents.✤ We envision structural change at institutions and within organizations because of the strategic integration of engage learning and community engagement.✤ We envision campus-community partnerships that are characterized by democratic engagement. 18
    • High-Impact Initiative Players Students Communities The space for High-Impact Projects Institutions Partners 19
    • ...A beautiful fractal 20
    • Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American society byincreasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals (undergraduates andalumni), organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Key Recommendations: 1. Foster civic ethos across all parts of the campus and educational culture. 2. Make civic literacy a core expectation for all students. 3. Practice civic inquiry across all fields of study. 4. Advance civic action through transformative partnerships, at home and abroad. A Crucible Moment p.31 Goal 21
    • Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American societyby increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals (undergraduates and alumni), organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Three-Year Cohort Based Model to: 1. Develop Staff 2. Build National Learning Community 3. Use Data and Measure Impact Strategy 4. Scale the HICEPs 5. Catalyze Campus Change 6. Support Community Change Goal 22
    • Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American societyby increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals (undergraduates and alumni), organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. 1. Build & support Campus Change Teams 2. Deploy the NASCE on all campuses Tactics 3. Facilitate strategic planning gatherings 4. Support work of Campus Change Teams across the year through calls, visits, resource generation, and accountability Strategy checkins. 5. Create a series of meetings, gatherings, and projects that move the work forward on an annual basis. Goal 23
    • Levels of Change To increase the community and civic health (well-being) of American societyby increasing the sustained, transformative engagement of individuals (undergraduates and alumni), organizations, and institutions in ways that contribute to community well-being. Events 1. NASCE & survey administration on your campus. 2. Strategic Planning sessions on your campus. 3. Inventory, Team Organization, Presidential Buy-in by your campus. 4. Spring Planning Retreat in Princeton. Tactics 5. Follow-up post-retreat planning on your campus. 6. Summer Leadership Institute Faculty Track at Carson-Newman. 7. Summer High Impact Institute in June at Siena. 8. Fall Director’s Meeting in November at Kanuga. Strategy 9. President/Provost/Dean retreat in Spring 2013. 10. Planning Retreat 2.0 in Spring 2013. Goal 24
    • Six Pathways✤ Develop staff✤ Scale high-impact community engagement practices (HICEPs)✤ Use data-driven design & impact measurement✤ Build a national learning community✤ Inform and catalyze institutional change✤ Inform & catalyze community change 25
    • Choosing and designing your High-Impact Project(s)High-Impact Community Community HICEPs Practice Partner(s) Change Does it help create integrative, institutional pathways (change)? (pervasive, deep, integrated) Developing Conceptual Framing for the Projects 26
    • Projects linking HIPs and HICEPs Campus/organizational change to support HICEPs Partnership development and community workStreams flowing from the Summer High-Impact Institute 27
    • Text...Discussion... 28