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Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
Gc imp model_subset1_052911
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Gc imp model_subset1_052911

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Draft of a model designed by Mike Bonifer of GameChangers and Dave Gray of The Dachis Group to describe an 'improvisational' organization or brand.

Draft of a model designed by Mike Bonifer of GameChangers and Dave Gray of The Dachis Group to describe an 'improvisational' organization or brand.

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  • Plan de Mejoramiento Institucional; Programa Calidad y Pertinencia Educativa
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  • Pixar: Toy Story, Bugs Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Cars, Rattatouille, Wall-E, Toy Story 3D, Toy Story 3, UpDisney: Pocahontas, Hunchback of Notre Dame, Hercules, Mulan, Tarzan (1999), Fantasia 2000, Tigger Movie, Emperor’s New Groove (2000), Atlantis, Beauty and the Beast IMAX, Peter Pan 2, Lilo and Stitch, Treasure Planet (2002), Jungle Book 2, Brother Bear, Home on the Range, Pooh’sHeffalump Movie, Chicken Little, Meet the Robinsons, Bolt (2008), Princess and the Frog, Tangled
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Improvisational Model
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
    • 2. This is your company.
      Your brand.
      You.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 3. It is not a question of whether things will change.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 4. ?
      ?
      ?
      It is a question of how.
      ?
      ?
      ?
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 5. p
      The Improvisational Model is an improvisation-based system for individuals and organizations to consistently generate positive outcomes in a dynamic business environment
      It operates on six sets of behaviors, or ‘Practices’ that can be learned and shared across your enterprise.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 6. p
      Performing
      Heeding
      Learning
      The six Practices are in natural tension with one another. Think of them like strings on a musical instrument or instruments in an orchestra. They should be in tune and in harmony.
      Engaging
      Creating
      Deciding
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 7. Market Ability
      Performing
      Empathy
      Knowledge
      Heeding
      Learning
      Outcomes
      Outcomes
      The six Practices result in six types of Outcomes that define your brand in the conceptual, virtual and physical dimensions which it performs.
      Engaging
      Creating
      Community
      Innovation
      Deciding
      Values
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 8. p
      p
      Performing
      Heeding
      Learning
      By continuously tuning and harmonizing the Practices, managers can orchestrate different business outcomes.
      Engaging
      Creating
      Deciding
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 9. p
      p
      Game
      Game
      There is a game structure to every business scene. The crucial question is whether a game is productive or reductive; whether it generates harmony or discord.
      Skillful leaders can tell the difference, and, when necessary, do something about it by, literally, changing the game.
      Game
      Game
      Game
      Game
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 10. p
      p
      Game
      Game
      The elements of an improvised game are: Objectives, Environments, Roles and Rules.
      Leaders can use game structure to adjust tensions between the Practices and orchestrate outcomes.
      Game
      Game
      Game
      Game
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 11. Market Ability
      Performing
      Empathy
      Knowledge
      Heeding
      Learning
      Outcomes
      Outcomes
      Leadership is Orchestration
      Engaging
      Creating
      Community
      Innovation
      Deciding
      Values
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 12. Citations
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 13.  
      “Improvisation has a positive effect on team innovation when combined with team and contextual moderating factors. We…provide initial evidence suggesting that the improvisational skill can be learned by organizational members through training. Our results shed light on the opportunities provided by training in improvisation and on the challenges of creating behavioral change going beyond the individual to the team and, ultimately, to the organization.’
      Improvisation and Innovative Performance in Teams
      Vera and Crossan; Organization Science, May-June 2005, pp. 203-224
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 14. A study published in the October, 2010, issue of Science concluded that “a group’s collective intelligence accounts for a 30 to 40 percent variation in performance.”
      Researchers found that the performances of groups “were not primarily due to the individual abilities of the group members. The average and maximum intelligence of individuals did not significantly predict the performance of their groups.” 
      Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the Performance of Groups
      Woolley, Chabris, Pentland, Hamshi and Malone
      Science, 29 October 2010 Vol. 330 no. 6004 pp. 686-688
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 15. I
      “I have noticed in the companies that I’ve started
      and funded and been associated with, that those
      companies that are fundamentally founded to
      change the world, to make the world a better place,
      to make meaning, are the companies that make a
      difference. They are the companies that succeed.
      “If you start a company with the intention to make
      meaning you will probably make money. If you start
      with the intention of making money, you won’t make meaning, and you probably won’t make money.”
      Make Meaning With Your Company
      Guy Kawasaki; Founder, Garage Technology Ventures; Academic Earth; Stanford University Lecture, Fall 2004
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 16. Performance
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 17. Case Study – Disney & Pixar
      Between 1995 and 2010, the boxoffice performances of Disney Animation and Pixar Animation products created two remarkably different trajectories.
      Global
      boxoffice
      revenues
      in millions
      of $
      Let’s analyze these trajectories in terms of ‘Orchestrating Change’ practices.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 18. Case Study – Core Practices
      The Game: Different emphasis on Values yields different Market Ability outcomes
      Casting itself as a ‘defender of values’ kept the brand focused on its past, at the expense of market ability in the present. The deciding question “What would Walt have done?” could only be answered subjectively.
      Embracing Disney’s values wholeheartedly liberated Pixar to
      focus on what was most crucial to its success—market ability.
      the deciding question “What will Jobs do next?” could be
      answered objectively.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 19. Case Study – Connecting Practices
      The Game: To engage with new communities, heed new voices and visions.
      By heeding primarily the sound of its own voice, Disney
      Animation crowded out new voices and limited its ability to
      engage new communities.
      By listening for new creative voices and heeding what was
      happening in Silicon Valley,Pixar was able to engage new (non-Disney) communities.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 20. Case Study – Discovery Practices
      The Game: Different relationships betweenLearning and Creativity produce
      differentInnovation outcomes.
      Its dependence on stock footage, archival reference material
      and institutional knowledge limited its ability to innovate and,
      as a result, the market lost its enthusiasm for the brand.
      Tapping into the powerful knowledge flow and problem-solving
      culture of Silicon Valley let Pixarget to solutions faster and
      consistently turn creative discoveries into market-able innovation.
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 21. Appendix
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model
    • 22. M
      Practices
      Outcomes
      p
      E
      K
      p = performing
      c = creating
      h = heeding
      d = deciding
      l = learning
      e = engaging
      M = Market Ability
      E = Empathy
      I = Innovation
      V = Values
      C = Community
      K = Knowledge
      h
      l
      c
      e
      I
      C
      d
      = Orchestration
      V
      These two diagrams show how practices can be orchestrated to produce business outcomes.
      In Example #1, directing resources toward heeding, learning and engaging results in Community activation.
      In Example #2, emphasis on learning and creating generates innovation, which, with skilled orchestration, results in Market Ability.
      Market
      Ability
      ‘Orch Charts’
      Example #1
      Example #2
      p
      h
      l
      l
      e
      c
      Community
      orch = heed, learn, engage
      orch = learn, create, perform
      Mike Bonifer/GameChangers
      Dave Gray/The Dachis Group
      The Improvisational Model

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