10 Tips for Doing Business 
          in China
About RJM Sales, Inc.
RJM Sales has been providing sales and marketing to 
   Chinese manufacturers, and procurement consu...
1. Know the features of the market.
• Some items like textiles are quota items. Quotas are 
  set by the U.S. government a...
2. Check the manufacturer’s 
              background.
• Investigate thoroughly, and get complete 
  information on past m...
3. Information gathering and 
         communication are critical. 
• The more details you provide, the better chance you ...
4. Know the Chinese culture. 
• Take the time to build a long‐term relationship based on 
  mutual trust. 
• Be patient. C...
5. Know that price bargaining is a true 
               art form. 
• Know the expected range of the product. 
• Know that ...
6. Know the quality you require. 
• Obtain quality certificates including material composition 
  reports, independent qua...
7. Communication and 
           miscommunication. 
• Most problems are a direct result of 
  miscommunication.
• Got thou...
8. Find companies that take the 
       initiative to solve problems.
• Due diligence is required to find qualified 
  tru...
9. Some Chinese (although limited in 
 number) dislike foreigners (Lao Wai).
• Remember there are people in our country 
 ...
10. Check and recheck all aspects of 
              production.
• There are no returns in China.
If you’re thinking about 
expanding your supply chain 
to China, we should talk. 

Bob Murphy
Founder & Principal
RJM Sale...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

10 tips for doing business in china

283 views
219 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
283
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

10 tips for doing business in china

  1. 1. 10 Tips for Doing Business  in China
  2. 2. About RJM Sales, Inc. RJM Sales has been providing sales and marketing to  Chinese manufacturers, and procurement consulting  and support to U.S. businesses since 1995.  Bob Murphy is the founder and principal of RJM. He has  over fifteen years of importing experience and is an  expert in quality control. He understands U.S. import  regulations and speaks Chinese.  If you’re looking for expertise in Chinese manufacturing,  contact Bob at bobmurphy@rjm‐sales.com. 
  3. 3. 1. Know the features of the market. • Some items like textiles are quota items. Quotas are  set by the U.S. government and they restrict the  number of units to be brought into the US during a  calendar year.  • Each item manufactured in China has a U.S. duty rate  associated with it, which is added to the landed cost of  the item. Some duty rates are very high.  • Not all companies have export licenses. If the  manufacturer doesn’t have the proper license, you will  need the services of a trading company. 
  4. 4. 2. Check the manufacturer’s  background. • Investigate thoroughly, and get complete  information on past manufacturing and export  experience, including references.  • Evaluate risks involved in buying from a particular  supplier.  • Check research reports for information on  expertise, capabilities and performance  evaluations.
  5. 5. 3. Information gathering and  communication are critical.  • The more details you provide, the better chance you have of  receiving a useful response from a potential supplier.  • Call the supplier and talk to the person in charge.  • Keep communication going. One you’re in contact, make sure  you stay in regular contact via email and phone.  • If you have to opportunity to visit the supplier, go and talk  face‐to‐face. It helps minimize miscommunication. • Know the details of production scheduling and lead times.
  6. 6. 4. Know the Chinese culture.  • Take the time to build a long‐term relationship based on  mutual trust.  • Be patient. Conducting international business requires  experience and knowledge, and this only comes with time.  • Get to know the company management personally. Discuss  how to protect intellectual property rights, trademarks,  patents and copyrights.  • Know you can now protects your company’s logos, slogans  and taglines in China.  • Delivery time requirements must factor in Chinese holidays.   
  7. 7. 5. Know that price bargaining is a true  art form.  • Know the expected range of the product.  • Know that having actual orders and quantities  helps you negotiate pricing.  • Offering partial payments up front to purchase  raw materials can work to your advantage— especially with smaller companies.  
  8. 8. 6. Know the quality you require.  • Obtain quality certificates including material composition  reports, independent quality reports and other evidence of  testing and inspection. Make sure certificates match the  claims of the suppliers.  • Obtain samples for assessment.  • Visit the factor to be sure suppliers adhere to the quality  certifications they claim to possess. Ask for evidence of  their quality management system such as procedural flow  charts, quality inspection records, internal audit reports. • Perfect samples do not guarantee perfect production. 
  9. 9. 7. Communication and  miscommunication.  • Most problems are a direct result of  miscommunication. • Got though all aspects of production including  packaging and transportation. Provide the  suppler with feedback reports.  • Always use written agreements. • Systems are available to translate all  communication if your managers do not read or  speak English. 
  10. 10. 8. Find companies that take the  initiative to solve problems. • Due diligence is required to find qualified  trustworthy suppliers. This is especially true if  you are planning a joint venture.  • Management is the key to qualified,  trustworthy suppliers. Know the people you’re  dealing with. 
  11. 11. 9. Some Chinese (although limited in  number) dislike foreigners (Lao Wai). • Remember there are people in our country  who dislike foreigners, too.  • If you have a bad experience with one person,  it doesn’t extend to cover everyone.
  12. 12. 10. Check and recheck all aspects of  production. • There are no returns in China.
  13. 13. If you’re thinking about  expanding your supply chain  to China, we should talk.  Bob Murphy Founder & Principal RJM Sales Inc. Headquartered in Chicago , IL Cell: 312‐399‐0159 LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/pub /bob‐murphy/0/948/9a5

×