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Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
Waddington g4h 2012 final
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Waddington g4h 2012 final

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  • 1. When “Real” Users Strike Back Post-mortem/Process/Evaluation Bob Waddington SimQuest, LLC. bwaddington@simquest.com @waddingtondcJune 2012 June 12-14, 2013 www.gamesforhealth.org Boston, MA
  • 2. What I’mPlaying…June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 3. Sim-Game Based Training Systems for Scene and Patient Management Following Blast Injury from Explosives Including Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Tom Reeves, PhD, UGA Supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Award No. W81XWH-09-C-0060.June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 4. When “Real” Users Strike Back“The feedback in the program is poor.”“Terrible mouse movement.”“… the ‘hand’…”“Improve instructions on how to use it.”“More carnage. More range of injuries.”June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 5. the ChallengeCommon errors made by responders• Enter scene too early or get too close with ambulance or personnel before scene is cleared• Gain access with no egress (blocked exits)• Don’t triage; just treat and transport 1st person• Risk casualties by moving them to unsafe triage/treatment areas• Improperly assess and/or treat casualtiesJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 6. the ChallengeBlast events introduce other challenges• Scene safety, triage and treatment require different approaches to scene and patient management• Additional risks to responding personnel from secondary explosion or shooters• Different injury patterns• Visual triage is not enoughJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 7. the ChallengeTraining• Large scales exercises are expensive• Any sized exercise is logistically challenging• Current training is mostly delivered through lecture and power point – some work on manikinsJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 8. the SolutionUtilizing 1st person gaming technology• Develop self-contained blast-specific modules that augment existing combat medic tactical combat casualty care (TCCC)• Provide lessons learned from bomb attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan, Madrid, London, etc.• Use real-world blast scene injury data• Provide safe individual/independent trainingJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 9. Project Description A first-person blast response game that allows users to respond to a terrorist bombing outside a busy train station. Users are assessed on their ability to • quickly and accurately assess victims’ injuries and tag them for treatment • assess the scene and identify additional risks prior to declaring the scene safe.June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 10. June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 11. June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 12. Evaluation Strategy Evaluate Overall • game design • usability • content • user choices • user path through scenarioJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 13. Formative Evaluation • Multidisciplinary Reviews • End-user Reviews • Players Feedback • Formal Study (IRB) • Implement findings into design and gameJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 14. Iterative reviewsJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 15. Formal StudyPrimary methodsUser tracking dataEvaluation questionnairesIndividual interviewsLocationsNorth CarolinaVirginia (EMT-B Class)Maryland June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 16. Study Participants • 42 first responders • 22 males • 20 females • 22 EMS, • 3 firefighter, • 17 police/security personnel • age range: 17 to 56 • average age: 34June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 17. Open Answer QuestionsWhat is the strongest aspect of the BLAST program?The most frequent responses included realism, its interactive nature, and the fact that itprovides the opportunity to practice triage skills.What is the weakest aspect of the BLAST program?Responses focused on usability issues, especially problems with using the mouse to controlmovements and decisions on screen., especially the lag between mouse movements andcorrelating screen movements .If you could improve anything in the BLAST program, what would it be?The most salient request for improvements concerned the clarity of the feedback, especially withthe need to put a “face” on the victims to improve the context of the scoring and feedback .Other desired improvements included making the mouse more responsive with less lag time andincreasing the noise and confusion presented in the scenario to make it more realistic.What other feedback can you provide concerning the BLAST program?Most of the study participants encouraged further development of additional scenarios for theBLAST program. Most of the concluding comments were very complimentary of the program. June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 18. When “Real” Users Strike Back What is the weakest aspect of the BLAST program?June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 19. When “Real” Users Strike Back What is the strongest aspect of the BLAST program?June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 20. When “Real” Users Agree 88% Similar programs should be developed 79% Program provided an engaging learning opportunityJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 21. When “Real” Users Agree 69% State-of-the-art for (educational games) 76% Should be used by most first responders 65% Program is very realisticJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 22. When “Real” Users Strike Back“I love the fact that it is visual, it has a reallife sense to it.”“…playing this and seeing differentscenarios will help me be able to managetriage casualties.”“…games such as this give a realisticscenario while taking (away) some of thestress a real situation would create.”June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 23. Formal RecommendationsDerived from the analysis of evaluation findings:1. Develop more scenarios if funding is available.2. Enhance the feedback in such a way that thelearner understands the specific victim for whomfeedback is being given. This could involve putting aunique “face” on each victim to identity of thecharacter whose “triage” was incorrect. June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 24. RecommendationsDerived from the analysis of evaluation findings:3. Reduce the lag between mouse movements and screenactions should be reduced.4. Consider increasing ambient noise and other distractions inthe scenario to make it more dynamic and engaging.5. The program developers should scrutinize the detailedrecommendations from the online survey transcripts to fixany specific problems identified by the evaluationparticipants. June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 25. Unexpected FindingsGroup settings • fosters discussion • peers can assist with controlsProvides “lab” to a lecturePre/post larger scales exercisesJune 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 26. ConclusionsGames need to involve more than the game playitself; delivery medium, end-user play environment,and the game’s integration into the greatercurriculum need to be factored for effective gamedesign.Real users can help get you there. “I’ve never seen the students so engaged” Chauncey Bowers CSP, ARM, Central Piedmont Community College June 2012 www.gamesforhealth.org
  • 27. Thank You! Bob Waddington SimQuest, LLC bwaddington@simquest.com @waddingtondcJune 12-14, 2013 November 5-6, 2012 Boston, MA www.gamesforhealtheurope.org Games for Health Conference

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