DEVELOP RELATIONSHIPS
WITH STRONG CREATORS
ESTABLISH CLEAR
CREATIVE GOALS
FOCUS ON
THE ABCS
Pitches come to us from
writers, producers, artists, teachers, actors, directors, students, book
authors, celebrities, mus...
• Greenlight 3-4 pilots a year and continue short form development
• Continue to deepen our pipeline so we can deliver up ...
• Girl Fantasy Series
• Odd Couple/ Buddy Comedy Series
• Scripted Live Action/ Musical Variety
AGES 0 - 5
• No memory of America
before Great Recession
or President Barack
Obama
• Parents more likely
to be
unemployed/under-
empl...
• Uncertain economy
and national security
pushing parents to
create more rules and
more controlled home
environments
• Spr...
• No memory of a
time when most
elementary-school
kids didn’t have
a cell phone or laptop
• Internet access
has always bee...
Television is the most popular platform for educational
content among all children, especially those from
lower-income fam...
3 SCENARIOS SEEM TO BE THE MOST COMMON:
• It’s TV time: The child/mom/care-giver decides it’s “TV time,” and use the remot...
2 YEARS OLD 3 YEARS OLD
LANGUAGE
MILESTONES
• Learning to talk
• Sings A-B-Cs but doesn’t understand
• Initiate conversati...
2 YEARS OLD 3 YEARS OLD
SOCIAL AND
EMOTIONAL
MILESTONES
• Parallel play
• Uses art to manage feelings
• Beings to recogniz...
4 YEARS OLD 5 YEARS OLD
LANGUAGE MILESTONES • Talk in almost complex sentences • Pronounce words clearly
• Speaks complex ...
4 YEARS OLD 5 YEARS OLD
COGNITIVE MILESTONES • Follow multi-step directions
• Understand explanations
• Complete more comp...
BOYGIRL
LANGUAGE
MILESTONES
• The average 20 month old girl has twice the vocabulary
of a boy at the same age
• Girls bein...
BOYGIRL
SOCIAL &
EMOTIONAL
MILESTONES
• Girls are more sophisticated at reading nonverbal signs,
(E.g. tone of voice, expr...
We are on the hunt for fresh, breakthrough content
that checks all the boxes
Funny
Character Driven
Strong Storytelling
Cu...
AJ, an 8 year-old
boy, his monster truck
Blaze and friend
Maddie fight against
their arch
nemesis, Crusher, along
with a f...
With the help of the home
viewer, Wally can use the
magic stick to play with his
friends and make incredible
things happen...
• Preschool humor is simple and somewhat limited due to developmental stage.
• A genuine sense of humor develops by age 2
...
• Is something that is safe for my child to watch
• Teaches my child skills or knowledge he/she will need for school
• Tea...
• Is a show I enjoy watching with my child
• Helps my child learn valuable life lessons
• Is an interactive experience for...
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
Nick Annecy Deck
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Nick Annecy Deck

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Nick Annecy Deck

  1. 1. DEVELOP RELATIONSHIPS WITH STRONG CREATORS ESTABLISH CLEAR CREATIVE GOALS FOCUS ON THE ABCS
  2. 2. Pitches come to us from writers, producers, artists, teachers, actors, directors, students, book authors, celebrities, musicians, health care professionals, construction workers, athletes, and children.
  3. 3. • Greenlight 3-4 pilots a year and continue short form development • Continue to deepen our pipeline so we can deliver up to 3 new shows a year • Creatively partner with our Nick global channels to develop content that can work globally as well as in the US • Identify the strongest global acquisitions in the market to compliment in-house productions
  4. 4. • Girl Fantasy Series • Odd Couple/ Buddy Comedy Series • Scripted Live Action/ Musical Variety
  5. 5. AGES 0 - 5
  6. 6. • No memory of America before Great Recession or President Barack Obama • Parents more likely to be unemployed/under- employed and cautious about jobs and investments • Families more likely to garden, cook homemade, and go DIY with sewing or home repair projects
  7. 7. • Uncertain economy and national security pushing parents to create more rules and more controlled home environments • Spread of the “neo-traditional” DIY lifestyle leads to more activities parents do with children • Total time that “hands-on” Gen-X parents spend with children and their schools may reach a new peak
  8. 8. • No memory of a time when most elementary-school kids didn’t have a cell phone or laptop • Internet access has always been high-speed, instantly connected and mobile • With more controlled environments, spend less time playing outside and more time, at younger ages, interacting with various screens
  9. 9. Television is the most popular platform for educational content among all children, especially those from lower-income families • The average age of a kid’s first TV viewing is 9 months old • Time spend with screen media ranges from under an hour a day (:53) among children under two to 2:18 among 2- to 4-year-olds • TV/Media characters serve as strong role models for both boys and girls
  10. 10. 3 SCENARIOS SEEM TO BE THE MOST COMMON: • It’s TV time: The child/mom/care-giver decides it’s “TV time,” and use the remote to scan to see what is available for viewing or tune into previously recorded programming • Serendipity: Child plays/wanders in front of the TV set (which is on) and sees something they want to watch • Appointment viewing: Mom/care-giver/child knows that a favorite show is on and tunes in (either live or previously recorded) • Around 4 out of 10 kids are choosing non-TV platforms as their preferred way to watch TV and we believe that number is even higher among preschoolers.
  11. 11. 2 YEARS OLD 3 YEARS OLD LANGUAGE MILESTONES • Learning to talk • Sings A-B-Cs but doesn’t understand • Initiate conversation • Simple sentence formation WRITING MILESTONES • Scribble anywhere and everywhere • Scribble turns into letters PHYSICAL MILESTONES • Hold crayon with fist • Holds crayon with finger instead of fists • Catch large ball using hands and their bodies • Make balls and snakes out of clay COGNITIVE MILESTONES • Completes self-chosen, short-term, concrete tasks • Able to focus for longer period of time • Flexibility in problem-solving • Put together simple puzzles
  12. 12. 2 YEARS OLD 3 YEARS OLD SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL MILESTONES • Parallel play • Uses art to manage feelings • Beings to recognize feelings and emotions • Friendships being • Learning to share • Copy other kids’ actions EVERYDAY LIFE MILESTONES • Toilet training • Makes choices based on preferences (E.g. food, clothes, toys) • Can undress but needs help getting dressed • Sleeping in a big-kid bed COUNTING & OBJECTS MILESTONES • Sorts by shapes • Start using number words • Know a while object can be separated into parts • Count to “5” and recognize numbers “0-9”
  13. 13. 4 YEARS OLD 5 YEARS OLD LANGUAGE MILESTONES • Talk in almost complex sentences • Pronounce words clearly • Speaks complex sentences • Begin reading and writing WRITING MILESTONES • Know almost all letters • Associate letters with sounds • Create realistic drawings w/ recognizable subjects, shapes and settings PHYSICAL MILESTONES • Can hold writing tools w/ a more mature grip • Able to throw, catch, kick and bounce balls • Skillful at walking, climbing, jumping, skipping, etc. • Able to ride bike without training wheels, jump rope, perform most ball related skills • Engage in long periods of active play and exercise
  14. 14. 4 YEARS OLD 5 YEARS OLD COGNITIVE MILESTONES • Follow multi-step directions • Understand explanations • Complete more complex puzzles • Play with toys that have small parts • Offer more imaginative ideas for how to do tasks • Solve longer-term or more abstract challenges SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL MILESTONES • Complex pretend play (with self and others) • Extended peer play into groups EVERYDAY LIFE MILESTONES • Learning manners • Dress and undress without help • Learning to tell time • Recognize sequence of events COUNTING & OBJECTS MILESTONES • Count to “10” • Add and subtract up to “4” • Greater grasp of shapes • Count to “20” • Recognize positions (E.g., under, behind, over)
  15. 15. BOYGIRL LANGUAGE MILESTONES • The average 20 month old girl has twice the vocabulary of a boy at the same age • Girls being to talk sooner and more clearly • Girls continue to be ahead of boys until age 6, at which point the differences start to go away • More boys than girls are late talkers • Boys use more limited vocabularies PHYSICAL MILESTONES • Girls’ fine motor skills (holding a pencil, writing) usually improve first • Some argue that girls are more likely to be interested in art (painting, coloring, crafts) for this reason • Boys’ gross motor skills (e.g. running, jumping) usually develop faster than girls’. • Boys do better at task involving muscle strength. • Throwing speed and distance is greater for boys. Boys show higher activity levels than girls which explain why they do more squirming, rolling, climbing, fidgeting, running, etc. COGNITIVE MILESTONES • Girls are often better at verbal fluency, writing ability and perceptual speed • Boys typically perform better at spatial tasks and math problem solving.
  16. 16. BOYGIRL SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL MILESTONES • Girls are more sophisticated at reading nonverbal signs, (E.g. tone of voice, expression), which also makes them better communicators early on. • Girls often connect feelings and words faster than boys. • Research suggests that preschool girls appear more competent overall in determining the intentions of others and in generating effective solutions to social problems • No distinct gender differences for boys. EVERYDAY LIFE MILESTONES • Girls on average are potty-trained earlier than boys. Some say that this could be due to the fact that moms usually do the training, making it easier for girls. • Fewer girls wet their beds • No distinct gender differences for boys. COUNTING & OBJECTS MILESTONES • There is no evidence that either sex performs better at any early quantitative skills – like counting – in preschool. • As they get older, girls tend to outperform boys in math, but boys do better on tests measuring math abilities.
  17. 17. We are on the hunt for fresh, breakthrough content that checks all the boxes Funny Character Driven Strong Storytelling Curriculum Diversity Visually Innovative Relatable Great Trans-media Potential
  18. 18. AJ, an 8 year-old boy, his monster truck Blaze and friend Maddie fight against their arch nemesis, Crusher, along with a fleet of other trucks.
  19. 19. With the help of the home viewer, Wally can use the magic stick to play with his friends and make incredible things happen, as long as that trouble maker Bobgoblin doesn’t ruin the fun.
  20. 20. • Preschool humor is simple and somewhat limited due to developmental stage. • A genuine sense of humor develops by age 2 • Physical humor is the most common humor in the early preschool years • Connected to ongoing play activies • Because language skills are rapidly growing and developing, this is an area that is particularly exciting to preschoolers. • Language is novel and fun and 2-5s pay special attention to how words sound and don’t. • Preschoolers begin to understand the existence of categories for different objects. (e.g. they meow, have whiskers, etc.), so they enjoy violating these norms • Similarly, distorting and playing with how things naturally work and function is funny. • Preschoolers are very perceptually oriented, so strong visual stimuli can be very provocative to them
  21. 21. • Is something that is safe for my child to watch • Teaches my child skills or knowledge he/she will need for school • Teaches my child problem solving and critical thinking skills • Is easy for my child to follow and understand • Has characters and situations my child can relate to • Give my child positive role models • Is for kids my child’s age • Makes my child feel like he/she is a part of the show
  22. 22. • Is a show I enjoy watching with my child • Helps my child learn valuable life lessons • Is an interactive experience for my child • Teaches my child about important subjects (E.g. science, math) • Introduces my child to music he/she likes • Keeps my child’s attention from the beginning of the show to end • Makes my child laugh

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