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BlogHer '12: Avoid Analytics Overload: Google Analytics Tips
 

BlogHer '12: Avoid Analytics Overload: Google Analytics Tips

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Avoid Analytics Overload: Google Analytics Tips at BlogHer '12

Avoid Analytics Overload: Google Analytics Tips at BlogHer '12

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  • Sure, number of visitors is important… But so are a lot of other stats. Trends are even more important! The graphs can help you see if your site is growing over time, and if you reader engagement is growing over time. Is your bounce rate increasing or decreasing? How many pages per visit does your average visitor read? Looking at the “Big Picture” is much more important than simply looking at total number of visits or pageviews. (Even if you have advertising on your site.) Defaults to last 30 days. Click to change… Can also compare time periods. “ Bounce Rate” is the percentage of visitors who come to your site, view that one “landing” page, and then don’t view another page. Regular readers may also be “bouncers” because they will read your latest post and then leave. As such, bounce rates on blogs tend to be higher than other sites. Can view by day, week, or month. Choosing larger chunks can help identify trends. put in screenshot of whole dashboard, animate through all the definitions how to set date range definitions how to change the graph metric click on one of those graphs next to the overview metrics to get to a graph about that metric Visitor: An individual user of your site Visit/Session: Time from when a visitor enters and leaves your website Pageviews: Every time a visitor views a web page on a site Pages/Visit - 2 to 3 is typical Site Referrer: External web page that brought visitor to you Conversion: When a visitor completes an action (buys a product, subscribes to newsletter) Bounce Rate: Percentage of visitors that exit after only viewing one page of a website. Typical rate for a blog: 50% to 75% www.eatingrules.com
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  • Not every visit lasts 1 minute and 31 seconds! Looking at the distribution curve helps us understand what’s really happening. The blue bars below show you the percentage of visitors in each time-group. The distribution shows a completely different story than the overall average. 80% of my visits last less than 10 seconds! How can you reduce the % that are in the 0-10 second group? Start looking at the changes to this curve over time to gauge your progress and success. www.eatingrules.com
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BlogHer '12: Avoid Analytics Overload: Google Analytics Tips BlogHer '12: Avoid Analytics Overload: Google Analytics Tips Presentation Transcript