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Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
Japan before 1333
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Japan before 1333

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  • 1. JAPAN BEFORE 1333 Blanca Chen
  • 2. MAP
  • 3. Jomon • 10,500 BC ~ 300 BC • Jomon – “cord marking” decoration on pottery • One of the earliest nations with Pottery making • Pottery designs become more complex during Middle Jomon (2500-1500 BC)
  • 4. Vessel, from Miyanomae, Nagano Prefecture, Japan, Middle Jomon Period, ca. 2500- 1500 BCE. Earthware
  • 5. Yayoi • • • • 300 BC ~ 300 AD Culture emerged in Kyushu and spread northward Began interaction with China and Korea Korean immigrants brought social and technological changes to Japan • Produce ceramics that were less sculptural than Jomon pottery and sometimes painted • Developed bronze-casting and loom weaving
  • 6. Dotaku with incised figural motifs, from Kagawa prefecture, Japan, late Yayoi period, ca. 100 – 300 CE. Bronze
  • 7. Dotaku Han Chinese Bell 編鍾
  • 8. Kofun • 300 ~ 552 AD • Kofun – ‘Old Tombs’ – burial mounds that began to appear in 300 AD
  • 9. Tomb of Emperor Nintoku , Sakai, Osaka Prefecture, Japan, Kofun period, late fourth to early fifth century
  • 10. Haniwa warrior, from Gunma Prefecture, Japan, Kofun period, fifth to mid-sixth century. Low-fired clay
  • 11. Shinto • Shinto – “Way of the Gods” • Religious structure embraced during the Yayoi and Kofun period • Associated with the development of agriculture • People worship varies dieties or spirits, known as Kami, and build shrines for them • Purity is the critical aspect of the religion • Until the introduction of Buddhism, religious images did not exist
  • 12. Ise Shrine, Ise, Mie Prefecture, Kofun Period or later, rebuilt in 1993
  • 13. Asuka and Nara • 552~645 / 645~784 • Buddhism was first introduced to Japan through the gift from one of the Korean rulers, King Syong Myong, to the Japanese Emperor Kimmei • Shinto continued to have its significance with the locals, especially with agricultural rituals and the imperial court rites • The Japanese government experienced changes as they increasingly adopt the system of the Chinese court
  • 14. Tori Busshi, Shaka triad, kondo, Horyuji, Nara Prefecture, Japan, Asuka period, 623. Bronze
  • 15. Yakushi triad, kondo, Yakushiji, Nara Prefecture, Japan, Nara Period, late seventh or early eighth century, Bronze
  • 16. Kondo, Horyuji, Nara Prefecture, Japan, Nara period, ca. 680
  • 17. Amida triad, Horyuji, Nara Prefecture, Japan, Nara Period, ca. 710. Ink and colors
  • 18. Daibutsuden, odaiji, Nara, Japan, Nara period, 743; rebuilt 1700
  • 19. Heian • 794~1185 • Named after the new capital that is now known as Kyoto • From the middle of the ninth century on, relations between Japan and China deteriorated by the end of the century • Japanese court become much more selfdirected
  • 20. Taizokai (Womb World) mandara, Kyoogokokuji, Kyoto, Japan, Heian period, 9th centurt
  • 21. Phoenix hall, Byodoin, Uji, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, Heian period, 1053
  • 22. Genji Visits Mursaki, from the Minoir chapter, Tale of Genji, Heian period, first hald of 12 century, Handscroll, ink and color on paper
  • 23. • The flying storehouse, from the Legends of Mount Shigi, Heian period, late 12 century, Handscroll, ink and colors on paper
  • 24. Kamakura • 1185~1332 • In the late 12 century, a series of civil war between rival warrior families ended Japanese imperial court • The victors, Minamoto family, established their shogunate (military government) at Kamakura • More frequent and positive contact with China brought recent cultural developments, ranging from new architectural styles to Zen Buddhism
  • 25. Portrait statue of the priest Shunjobo, Chogen, Todaiji, Nara, Japan, Kamakura period, 1206, painted cypress wood
  • 26. Kosho, Portrait statue of the priest Kuya preaching, Kamakura period. Early 13th century, painted wood with inlaid eyes
  • 27. Night attack on the Sanjo Palace, from the Events of the Heiji Period, Kamakura period, 13th century. Handscroll, in and colors on paper
  • 28. Amida descending over the Mountains, Zenrinji, Kyoto, Japan, Kamakura period, 13th century. Hanging scroll, ink and colors on paper
  • 29. Quiz • 1) How did Shinto Shrines reflect the values of the religion? • 2) How was Buddhism introduced to Japan? • 3) ‘Jomon’ refers to what aspect of the pottery of the time period?
  • 30. Quiz • 4) What is the system used to build this shrine? • 5) What is the significance of the appearance of this shrine?
  • 31. Answer • 1. e.g. Ritual reconstruction of Shinto shrines represents ritual renewal and purification practiced in Shinto • 2. Buddhism was first known in Japan through King Syong Myong of Korea - He gave a gilded- bronze Buddha statue and translated Sutras as a gift
  • 32. Answer • 3. Jomon, meaning cordlike, refers to the decorative technique using long thin strings of slabs the potters used to decorate the earthwares • 4. Mortise –and –tenon system; in which builders slip the wallboards into slots in the pillars
  • 33. Answer • 5. The Ise Shrine’s main hall appears to be Japanese granaries – among the most important building in Japan’s agrarian society

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