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Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers
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Climate Change green breakfast seminar - making international supply chains work for smallholder farmers

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Blake Lapthorn Solicitor's Climate Change team held a green breakfast on climate change on Tuesday 20 November 2012. We were joined by guest speaker, James Bennett, Business Development Manager at …

Blake Lapthorn Solicitor's Climate Change team held a green breakfast on climate change on Tuesday 20 November 2012. We were joined by guest speaker, James Bennett, Business Development Manager at Fairtrade Foundation.

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  • Good morning everyone Thanks for inviting me to be here today to talk to you about Fairtrade and our work both in the UK and internationally as we work to ensure the empowerment and development of smallholder organisations in supply chains. My name is James Bennett and I have worked at the Foundation for almost 3 years- in my role I work across and manage all the foodservice accounts to try and support commitments they have already made or push for them to do more to create impact for Producers
  • KATE Key points Started over 20 years ago as a grassroots movement with the objective of paying farmers a fair price and instigated by key organisation such as Oxfam, WI, Traidcraft to form FTF and introduce the consumer facing Mark. Pioneering organisation such as Divine and Cafedirect led the way in generating consumer awareness of the need for FT and developing business models with the producers at the heart. The fast increasing consumer awareness has driven the movement to the mainstream market making Fairtrade accessible to more customers, more producers and more businesses. So what The involvement of NGOs as board members and the support of the government (DFID funding as recognition of success) ensures that the vision of improving farmers lives has stayed at the heart of Fairtrade. Organisations that have followed in the footsteps of those pioneers by investing in Fairtrade have done so because they realise the importance of investing in their supply chain to ensure sustainability. Customers want more Fairtrade products to be available in more places and they want their favourite brands to be acting ethically responsible
  • KATE Key Facts and so what 20 years on, those key influencers – campaigners, pioneers, NGOs have helped drive the movement to where we are today. With sales of over £1.1b in 2011, consumer awareness increasing YoY and is around 77% and brands like Cadbury, B&Js and Green and Blacks increasing their commitment to Fairtrade. If you look at what Cadburys have done, its not just the certification of products, they have also invested XXX amount in their producers directly, specifically in XXXXX Producer premiums totalled €50m in 2010. More producers want to be part of the Fairtrade movement as they see the direct benefit to those around them and producers that are already selling want to sell more. Fairtrade is the most highly recognised and trusted certification mark which provides consumers with an easy way to play their role in making farmers lives better.
  • Slide Ten: Producers Benefiting from Fairtrade Aim This slide aims to show the increase in the number of producers benefiting from Fairtrade. Take time to talk through and explain this graph. Key Points This wide range of products and their increased availability in both large supermarkets and smaller independent stores, at home, at work and at restaurants means that people can buy more products in more places more often. This huge growth of Fairtrade – which reached just over £1bn in the UK in 2010 – means that more and more producer groups can benefit. That’s great news – because it means that as well as the 1.4 million people that these 632 producer groups directly represent, Fairtrade is also supporting them in bringing about wider change in their communities, benefiting many more. In 2008 an estimated $10.3 million of premium was paid to producers from UK Fairtrade banana sales. But it’s still not enough. On average households spend just £1 a week on Fairtrade goods. If we all put just one more item in our baskets per week, we’d be taking Fairtrade twice as far. Many of the Fairtrade certified farmers’ groups are only selling a small proportion of their total crop on Fairtrade terms. Only 1% of cotton sold on the UK high street is currently carrying the Fairtrade label. Can you imagine what they could do if just 5% of total cotton sold in the UK was delivering a fair price and premium to cotton farmers? Just imagine the difference cotton growers could make to the wider community if they could sell more. They need more company buyers. That means more companies need more customers to demand Fairtrade products. Fairtrade is growing – but there are still millions of farmers, workers and their families it hasn’t been able to reach. In short, this is just the beginning. There is still a lot of change needed – and we need more people to take a step for Fairtrade to reach more farmers and workers. Possible Questions Think of the products you have seen or bought. What countries are involved? Can you find them on a map of the world?
  • Now let’s go back to the topic that is of greatest interest to producers and to your businesses – Fairtrade growth in future. I talked earlier about Fairtrade being at the tipping point. It is important to remember why realising this tipping point matters. Today, with your support and engagement, about 1.5 m farmers / workers benefit from Fairtrade. But there are over a billion who are looking to improved livelihoods. So I am afraid we cant yet rest on our laurels. UK market alone cannot possibly reach out to all these people and I do not want to make simplistic comparisons of Fairtrade sales to total grocery market. But even if we look at conservative estimates of value of UK imports of the right kind of commodities from the Fairtrade origin countries, then we still see a huge potential.
  • Slide Two: The FAIRTRADE Mark Aims To explain what the FAIRTRADE Mark and the Fairtrade Foundation are. Key Points The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label on products in the UK to show that they guarantee a better deal for farmers and workers in developing countries. Fairtrade is an independent, international certification and auditing system, designed to make trade work for development. Fairtrade International is the international body that sets standards for Fairtrade products and inspects and certifies producer organisations against them. It also audits the flow of goods between Fairtrade producers and exporters and importers handling Fairtrade products. The Fairtrade Foundation is the UK member of Fairtrade International and licenses companies to use the FAIRTRADE Mark on individual products that meet these internationally agreed Fairtrade Standards. The Fairtrade Foundation is an independent non-profit organisation dedicated to reshaping trade as a development tool More than 7.5 million people - farmers, workers, their families and their communities - in 58 countries benefit from the international Fairtrade system. None of this is possible without shoppers. More and more people are choosing products with the FAIRTRADE Mark and this makes a real difference to farmers and workers in developing countries. By choosing Fairtrade products we make sure producers receive a fair price and we show our support for an alternative way to trade that puts justice and sustainable development at its heart.
  • Slide Three: Small steps make big changes happen Aim To explain why Fairtrade is needed and what the FAIRTRADE Mark means. Key Points If all trade was fair we wouldn’t need an alternative. But 2 billion people – one third of humanity – work hard for a living but still struggle to survive on less than $2 a day The rules and practices of international trade are biased in favour of rich countries and powerful companies, often to the cost of poor producers and the environment. Many farmers and workers in developing countries struggle to provide for their families. Often the price they get paid for their crop does not cover the cost of production. This can cause real suffering in the short term and makes it impossible for farmers to plan from one harvest to the next. We’ve come a long way with 7.5million people now benefitting from Fairtrade, but we need to do much more. Fairtrade seeks to put justice and sustainable development at the heart of global trade. It is not the single answer to all forms of poverty, but it is one way to make a real difference to farmers and workers around the world and proves that trade can work for people and planet. When you see the FAIRTRADE Mark on a product, it means that this product has been independently certified to make sure producers are getting a better deal from what they sell. It means that: The producers have received a fair and stable price for their products – enough for today In addition to the basic price, farmers and workers have the opportunity to improve their lives through an additional premium – to invest in tomorrow. They can use this money any way they like to improve their own organisations, or invest in their community. Farmers and workers decide democratically what these projects should be. Fairtrade standards aim to protect and improve the environment , and promote sustainable agricultural practices. With the extra income that farmers receive from Fairtrade, they can also invest in their own environmental projects, such as recycling, tree planting, clean water programmes. Some farmers are also using money from Fairtrade to convert to organic farming methods. Small farmers gain a stronger position in world markets. By working together farmers can be stronger in the market. Fairtrade supports small farmers in building up their own organisations, and helping them to compete in a vicious market place. With Fairtrade, we can feel a closer link with people at the other end of the supply chain, who grow the products we buy. The FAIRTRADE Mark may be small but it tells a big story ! Each time you choose a Fairtrade product, you create more opportunities for farmers and workers to build a better future. Your choices also send a powerful signal to politicians and businesses about how we want international trade to work However, there are many more farmers who could benefit through selling products on Fairtrade terms and many Fairtrade producer groups who want to sell more of what they produce on Fairtrade terms. To make this happen we need more people to choose Fairtrade and more businesses to make Fairtrade part of what they do. Possible Questions What does the FAIRTRADE Mark mean to you, when you see it on a product?
  • Slide Five: The Fairtrade premium (images: Schools, bus shelter, Windward Islands) Aim The importance of the Fairtrade premium that is included in the price. Key Points As well as the fair and stable price, producer organisations receive a premium on top of this that is set aside for farmers and workers to spend on social and environmental projects in the community or to strengthen their organisations. The premium money is put into a separate account, and the farmers and workers decide together how to invest it. Within the community the social premium might be used for securing electricity, clean water, health and education programmes or even sports grounds. Within a co-operative it might be used to diversify their production, improve quality control or purchase more effective equipment. Investments like these allow communities to make long term improvements and work their own way out of poverty. Decisions on how the premium is spent are taken democratically by committees of elected farmers. On larger farms with hired workers, a Joint Body of management and elected workers make these decisions. Fairtrade premium use in St Vincent, Windward Islands Benefits of Fairtrade On top of the Fairtrade Minimum Price for every box of Fairtrade bananas it sells, WINFA receives an additional Fairtrade Premium of $1.00 per box to fund community projects and business improvements or to invest in diversification into other agricultural products and income generating schemes.   St Vincent Fairtrade Group has recently used the premium to purchase a new school bus , build and equip a school science lab , supply schools with laptops, photocopiers, a projector and library books , provide scholarships for gifted children, and equip a multipurpose centre where young people can learn carpentry, welding and other skills to improve their employment opportunities.   WINFA has continued to invest in supporting farmers across the islands to improve facilities to meet supermarket quality requirements and maintain market access. This involves upgrading packing stations , installing pit toilets and lunch rooms for workers , and providing training on certification standards and record keeping.   The islands’ Fairtrade Groups have jointly invested in the Montaque agro-tourism project. They have refurbished a small processing plant near the tourist destination of La Soufriere in St Vincent, to process their passion fruit, guava, mango and other fruit into jams, jellies, juices and chutneys for sale locally, so they have other ways to bring in income, other than tourism. Possible Questions Does anyone know what the Fairtrade premium is? What types of things is it used for? Who decides on how the Fairtrade premium is used?
  • Slide Six: Greater Respect for the Environment (drying cocoa beans, Conacado coop, Dominican Republic) Aim Using the case of CONACADO, a coffee cooperative in Costa Rica, this aims to illustrate the commitment of Fairtrade standards to protecting and improving the environment as well as how increased income from Fairtrade makes this possible. Key Points Farmers across the world are under pressure to increase their yields by using more chemicals, threatening human health and environmental sustainability. Fairtrade standards aim to protect the environment and the extra income from Fairtrade makes this possible. In the case of all products: 1) Fairtrade producers are required to dispose of waste products safely and responsibly. 2) Use of GM seeds is banned. 3) Diversification and crop rotation are encouraged to improve soil fertility. 4) Farmers are encouraged to progressively reduce use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides Example CONACADO is a democratically-run co-operative made up of 182 small-scale producer associations and has a membership of 10,000 cocoa farmers. The average farm is 4.3 hectares (10.6 acres). Cocoa is grown under the shade canopy of tall native trees and smaller banana, citrus, and avocado trees whose fruit is sold at the local market. The organisation’s broader mission is to improve the livelihoods of its members by supporting the sustainable production of high quality cocoa beans. To this end, CONACADO provides a range of services such as technical assistance, processing facilities, warehousing and transport, access to interest-free loans and credit, and support and training to meet Fairtrade and organic certification standards. Through its Fairtrade premium CONACADO supports many community development programmes and promotes environmental protection and the sustainable use of natural resources in production. Including a wormery that has been set up to turn waste into organic compost and training courses' for farmers and technicians to help with sustainably increasing yields and an organic production programme teaching skills and imparting organic farming knowledge. Example 2 (optional but another great example) In Costa Rica, the Llano Bonito Co-operative has invested in new coffee drying equipment. Gerardo Arias Camacho, a coffee farmer and member of the co-op explains that whereas the old wood fired ovens forced the farmers to cut down trees, the new environmental ovens run using the pulp from coffee cherries and macadamia nut husks and they are encouraging members of the local community to also bring in their own recyclable waste. This means fewer trees are being cut, more of the community are now recycling, and farmers are planting new trees to prevent soil erosion as well as protecting their streams and rivers. As Gerardo says, ‘ you are helping us in developing countries to have a more dignified life, be able to protect the environment, we are protecting the whole world by protecting the lungs of the world, the forests we have there. You buy our products under Fairtrade terms, and we send you oxygen back. It’s a nice way of doing business.’ Optional Converting farms to organic is an expensive and time consuming process. We in the UK need to be asking our retailers for and choosing Fairtrade organic products to make this conversion worthwhile for producers. Unless they can get a market for their organic produce, they will not receive the benefit for the dedication they put into growing organically.
  • Slide Seven: A Stronger Position in World Markets Aim Using examples of banana production in the Windward Islands and the Dominican Republic, this aims to illustrate the ways in which Fairtrade can strengthen the position of farmers in a competitive world market. Key Points Thousands of families in the Windward Islands in the Caribbean make their living growing bananas on small farms. During the 1990s, small farmers across the Caribbean have been under threat from competition from large-scale Latin America banana plantations where labour is cheaper and costs are lower. Organisations of small-scale growers have struggled to sell their bananas at a price that enables them to maintain a livelihood for their families. Jose Peralta is the President of one co-operative, ASOBANU, in the Dominican Republic. Jose explains how Fairtrade has helped small farmers meet tough European supermarket rules for selling bananas. Jose says, ‘The most important thing for us to remain in the market. The requirements are many, and we are complying with them. These requirements come from overseas, and we have to comply in order to survive and so that our bananas can continue to be exported. Thanks to the Fairtrade premium, we have been able to improve the quality of our fruit, for example we have repaired many farmers’ packing houses and lots of other improvements. In my life, you know, I never thought that an organisation so important as Fairtrade could exist. For us small producers, we are very committed to Fairtrade, we hope it will continue making progress, it is our means of survival here in the Dominican Republic. We see Fairtrade as being part of a big family – Fairtrade is something we should treasure and protect.’ NB Watch the short video about Fairtrade bananas in the Dominican Republic on www.fairtrade.org.uk This is not an isolated case. Small farmers are often at a disadvantage in international trade, having to compete with large mechanised or industrial farms. Fairtrade encourages more direct, long-term, and stable relationships between farmers and traders. This leads to stronger producer organisations that are often more cost effective, sustainable and able to produce higher quality products. Optional Focus on Trade Justice [explains the new world trade issue) Bananas have been the mainstay of the economy in the Windward Islands in the Caribbean. Britain had been favouring bananas from the Windward Islands when importing because of their historical relationship with them. International trade rules have dictated that this preferential treatment must stop. Producers now must compete with producers in Latin America and Africa that produce bananas at a lower cost largely as a result of higher chemical usage and lower wages and social benefits for workers. Banana farmers of the Windward Islands who produce bananas in a more socially and environmentally friendly manner, have therefore lost market share and at worst, have gone out of business. Fairtrade has offered a new, niche market for these farmers but this will only help banana farmers survive if ‘we’ in the UK continue to choose Fairtrade bananas from the Windward Islands!
  • 1. COOCAFE partnered with public elementary schools to improve school meals . Children are taught to take care of the soil and understand the meaning of vegetables in meals. The project, School Vegetable garden, started in 2006 in the town of Iuna and has since been integrated into several cities in the surrounding areas. COOCAFE supplies raw materials and technical assistance to the gardens. 2. This is a pilot project that COOCAFE hopes will be implemented in more communities. (Source Coffee impact report TFUSA 2010)
  • 1. Including agro-forestry projects, organic fertiliser production, agricultural diversification and training. There are also efforts to eliminate and reduce the use of chemicals. (Source Coocafe videos 2009)
  • Cupping laboratory: And instituted a quality-control training program at the Peruvian Coffee Board ’ s cupping laboratory for the workers responsible for the storage and shipment of members' coffee. Farming equipment - including 40 de-pulping machines, 1,000 pruning saws and three humidity scales, and maintains its de-pulping machines in excellent working condition. Office equipment - eight computers, five printers and three photocopiers for its office. (Source Cecovasa Transfafir USA profile 2010) Cepicafe: Ninety percent of CEPICAFE's coffee and all of its cocoa, brown sugar and marmalades are Fairtrade certified. (Source Norandino Report – Gay Lea 2010)
  • Fairtrade means different things to different businesses. But with our strategy founded on insight, our new consumer segmentation model and a new approach to a year long campaign we aim to continue to drive sales (producer impact), build on trust and awareness to continue to make it easier for consumers to make ethical decisions through FT. Linked to that, we know that FT is never the primary purchasing decision in any category but we do know that when used effectively it compliments and enhances brand equity on perception measures. And finally and this is something we are working on, is how do we better include commercial partners in the wider movement.
  • The five broad elements of the radar diagram are as follows: • Net returns: the amount that the smallholders receive for their produce and its significance to their livelihood. This includes smallholders’ perception of whether they are ‘hanging in’, ‘ stepping up’ or ‘stepping out’. • Control over and % of the value chain: a combination of smallholders’ perceptions of their influence on the supply chain and the percentage of the final retail price that smallholders receive. • Supply chain coordination: the level of transparency and the extent to which information is exchanged between stakeholders within the value chain. • Influence on price and terms: smallholders’ perception of their ability to influence the price they receive for their produce. Control overand % of the value chain Supply chain coordination • Built capacity: the extent to which trading partners directly contribute to enhancing the long-term capacity of the smallholders.
  • Slide Fifteen: Make it happen Aims To end the presentation, and encourage people to stay involved Key Points You hope that you will have inspired people about Fairtrade, and the way in which, working together we can all make a difference by showing off a different way of doing trade, built by people and for people. Encourage people to stay involved: Try a new Fairtrade product today and introduce a friend to Fairtrade Find out what’s happening near with the Event Calendar on the Fairtrade Foundation website They can find out much more about Fairtrade on the website - www.fairtrade.org.uk Sign up to receive the latest about Fairtrade through email newsletters or the quarterly newsletter Fair Comment Take Fairtrade further and find out how you can bring Fairtrade to life in your community, school, university, place of worship or workplace at www.fairtrade.org.uk/get_involved People can sign up for the Fairtrade Foundation’s newsletters online. Let people know about any campaigning networks or events going on locally Finish by thanking everyone for their attention
  • Transcript

    • 1. © Fairtrade 2011
    • 2. This Morning: • Fairtrade • The Importance of Fairtrade • How we create and maintain Impact • Working with Smallholder Farmers© Fairtrade 2011
    • 3. FAIRTRADE© Fairtrade 2011
    • 4. Where Fairtrade has come from Where Fairtrade has come from 1988 1992 1994 1997 2000 2001 2003 2004 2007 2008 2009 20101st Fairtrade Fairtrade First UK Fairtrade Fairtrade Garstang Fairtrade Launch Sainsbury & Tate & Lyle Sainsbury’s Awareness product Foundation Fairtrade Labelling bananas declares itself Mark of FLO- Waitrose 100% tea and at 74%launches in created product Organisation launched first Fairtrade awareness Cert bananas all conversion coffeeNetherlands established town is 25% Fairtrade Fairtrade
    • 5. Fairtrade in 2012 Fairtrade in 2012 Premium delivered to producers (FLO M&E report 2010) UK FAIRTRADE Mark Awareness at 77% in 2011 (TNS)© Fairtrade 2011
    • 6. Growth in number of producer groups benefitting through Growth in number of producer groups benefitting through Fairtrade Fairtrade© Fairtrade 2011
    • 7. Fairtrade – huge need and potential Need 1.5 million V 1 billion Potential £1.5 billion V £8 billion Retail sales value of Fairtrade Conservative estimate of in the UK UK imports from Fairtrade producer countries© Fairtrade 2011
    • 8. THE IMPORTANCE OF FAIRTRADE© Fairtrade 2011
    • 9. The FAIRTRADE Mark is the only independent consumer guarantee of a better deal for producers in the developing world. 7.5 million peopleproducers, workers, their families and communities - benefit from Fairtrade
    • 10. The FAIRTRADE Mark means: Farmers receive a Producer groups fair and stable receive a premium price for their to invest in improving products their communities and businessesGreater respect for the environment Small farmers have a stronger A closer link position in between shoppers world markets and producers
    • 11. FAIRTRADE means…….extra income to invest inbringing about change forthe future
    • 12. FAIRTRADE means…….Producers are working to protect theirenvironment ‘With Fairtrade income we were able to implement a fermentation program to improve the quality of our cocoa and to convert our production to certified organic.’         Isidoro de la Rosa, Executive Director, CONACADO
    • 13. FAIRTRADE means……. Small farmers have a stronger position in world markets‘The banana industry in theWindward Islands is aboutlivelihood but due to unforeseenforces [world trade rules] we arestruggling, Fairtrade continues tobe our niche and I am confidentwe will survive”. Nioka Abbott, Banana Grower and Chair of Langley Park cooperative, St Vincent
    • 14. CREATING IMPACT© Fairtrade 2011
    • 15. How Fairtrade creates impact Standards EconomicPartnerships and Fairtrade Building Social Producer Environmental markets alliances impact Monitoring, evaluation Empowerment and research
    • 16. CommunityinfrastructureCoocafe – A COOCAFE Foundation offers COOCAFE has a projectCosta Rica a programme of scholarship to building septic tanks for producers’ children and gives local communities. As economic support to schools in the villages rely on water from the areas of the co-operatives local river for everyday needs, the rivers are becoming polluted. ‘With these grants, we are helping to make our  children professionals - they are now at  university with Fairtrade grants.  I have two nieces who are graduates. I know  one boy who is studying law thanks to  Fairtrade. There is another boy studying  aviation engineering.’ 01/01/2009
    • 17. EcologicalconservationCoocafe –Costa Rica COOCAFE set up a foundation to protect and conserve biodiversity and offer environmental education, aiming to make better use of natural resources available to satisfy producers’ economic needs
    • 18. Rise in tradingcapacityCecovasa –Peru CEPICAFE – Peru Since going Fairtrade, coffee exports have climbed from 8 to 1,700 tonnes per year
    • 19. WORKING WITH SMALLHOLDER FARMERS© Fairtrade 2011
    • 20. How do we work with our brand and supplier parnters? Supply Producer Sales Driver Assist with the security Partnerships Increases sales of supply for the future Brings buyers closer to their supply chain Brand Consumers Enhances brand equity Offers consumer facing through trust in the mark ethical assurance Evolving relationship with Brands Trading Practices Marketing Assists with changing buying Inclusion in a wider practices movement Sustainability Fundamental to a sustainable strategy for commodities© Fairtrade 2011
    • 21. How do Farmer organisations want to work with us? How do Farmer organisations want to work with us? Farmer Organisation’s model of change (Twin, 2010)© Fairtrade 2011
    • 22. Working with Working with Smallholder Smallholder Farmers to Farmers to support their support their development development© Fairtrade 2011
    • 23. Five elements of smallholder supply chain relationships Five elements of smallholder supply chain relationships© Fairtrade 2011
    • 24. Examples of supply chain Assessment
    • 25. Smallholder Premium spendFairtrade Premium expenditure by category:Small producer and contract production organisation 2009-10
    • 26. Looking to the future© Fairtrade 2011
    • 27. Producer Financial Profiling Producer Financial Profiling Helping smallholders provide a preliminary overview of the organisational structure and financial performance 4 Sections; - Score Summary - Facts and Figures - Capability Radar - Commentaries© Fairtrade 2011

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