The challenges and rewards of making ourbuilt heritage sustainable– lessons from Trinity College, Cambridge               ...
5th Studio5th Studio is an award-winning design practice based in the UK, with studios in London andCambridge.5th Studio’s...
Why make our built heritage sustainable?“At present 45% of the UK’s energy is consumed heating air andwater in existing bu...
Why make New Court sustainable?+	 Relationship between college’s refurbishment cycle and changing   climate and regulatory...
New CourtBuilt 1822 - 5           2. Sustainability                         Fabric and systemsWilliam Wilkins          a. ...
Outcomes           100%   Existing carbon emissions of New Court                  60% reduction in demand                 ...
Four things:1.		 Agency landscape - strengths / weaknesses2. 	 Policies - local and national3.		 Building - fabric and cha...
1.	Agency landscape - strengths / weaknesses                                                                              ...
2. Policies - local and national                                                                                          ...
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013
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Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013

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On Wednesday 20 March, Blake Lapthorn's Construction law team were joined at the Construction green breakfast by Oliver Smith of 5th Studio. Oliver's talk was titled 'the challenges and rewards of making our built heritage sustainable – lessons from Trinity College Cambridge'.

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Blake Lapthorn Construction green breakfast - 5th Studio presentation - 20 March 2013

  1. 1. The challenges and rewards of making ourbuilt heritage sustainable– lessons from Trinity College, Cambridge ©
  2. 2. 5th Studio5th Studio is an award-winning design practice based in the UK, with studios in London andCambridge.5th Studio’s work encompasses architecture, urbanism and landscape.  We avoid specialism.  We work in a studio setting which fosters a spirit of collaboration and a creative energy that arecentral to our work.5th Studio is an innovative, can-do organisation ready to take on any challenge.  We think big, whileour work is grounded in the particular conditions of each project and site.  We create designs andstrategies that are radical, beautiful and sensitive.
  3. 3. Why make our built heritage sustainable?“At present 45% of the UK’s energy is consumed heating air andwater in existing buildings, and 85% of today’s buildings will form70% of the building stock in 2050. If we are to get anywhere nearmeeting the CO2 emissions reduction targets (80% reduction inemissions relative to 1990 to be achieved by 2050), then all existingbuildings will need a major retrofit to ensure the improved efficiencyof energy use.” Professor Michael Kelly. CSA to DCLG from 2006. ©
  4. 4. Why make New Court sustainable?+ Relationship between college’s refurbishment cycle and changing climate and regulatory context+ Energy price futures+ Carbon Reduction Commitments+ Well-being, comfort (and productivity) of occupants ©
  5. 5. New CourtBuilt 1822 - 5 2. Sustainability Fabric and systemsWilliam Wilkins a. b. Photovoltaic panels Fresh air intake and outlets a.Grade I Listed c. Extract air and heat exchange b. d. Fabric upgrades c. - air tightness - insulation e. Underfloor heating f. Ground-source heat boreholes159 Rooms2/3 Shared facilities d. e. 3. Facade f.1/3 Ensuite rooms Renewal of fabricAccessible RoomsFellows teachingand residential setsSeminar Room 1. Rooms Character and comfortComplete new ©services installations
  6. 6. Outcomes 100% Existing carbon emissions of New Court 60% reduction in demand – improved insulation, reduced air leakage, improved use of daylight. 40% 43% increase in efficiency of the systems that meet this reduced demand – more efficient heating, lighting, ventilation equipment and control systems. 23% 55% reduction in the carbon in the energy (electricity/heat) supply - pv generation, ground source heat pump. 10% Future carbon emissions of New Court - reduced by 89.74%, to 10.26%, of existing ©
  7. 7. Four things:1. Agency landscape - strengths / weaknesses2. Policies - local and national3. Building - fabric and character4. An integrated package of works ©
  8. 8. 1. Agency landscape - strengths / weaknesses independent technical advisers English Stratecic Planning Glasgow Historic Caledonian Scotland Heritage UniversityROGER BOWDLER CHRIS SMITH STEVE TROW CADDW Environmental Listing Designation National Planning Director Heritage Protection Director Archimetrics REGIONAL DIRECTORS National Trust BILL BORDASS Keith Jones Triage Development Chief Technical Officer (unpaid) Historic Building Studies REGIONAL OFFICERS Georgian Group Environemntal BRIAN RIDOUT Senior Architectural Conservator. (Expert in Timber) Intelligence Inspectors Other amenity groups Advisors Science + Technology Conservation CHRIS WOOD SPAB Head of Conservation and Jonathan Garlick Research. Chief Technical Officer ©
  9. 9. 2. Policies - local and national MANAGING CHANGE TO SIGNIFICANT PLACESCONSERVATION Retaining the authenticity of a placePRINCIPLES is not always achieved by retainingPOLICIES AND GUIDANCE as much of the existing fabric as is Consider the effects on authenticity and integrity 91 Evidential value, historical values and some aesthetic values, especially artisticFOR THE SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT ones, are dependent upon a place retaining (to varying degrees) the actual fabric that has been handed down from the past; but authenticity lies in technically possible. whatever most truthfully reflects and embodies the values attached to the place (Principle 4.3). It can therefore relate to, for example, design or function, as well as fabric. Design values, particularly those associated with landscapes or buildings, may be harmed by losses resulting from disaster or physical decay, or through ill-considered alteration or accretion. Design value may be recoverable through repair or restoration, but perhaps at the expense of some evidential value. Keeping a large machine, like a water mill or boat lift, in use, may require replacement and modification of structural or moving parts which could be retained if it ceased to operate, producing a tension between authenticity of fabric and function. 92 The decision as to which value should prevail if all cannot be fully sustained always requires a comprehensive understanding of the range and relative importance of the heritage values involved (guided by the assessment of significance: paragraphs 82-83), and what is necessary (and possible) to sustain each of them. Retaining the authenticity of a place is not always achieved A desire to retain authenticity tends by retaining as much of the existing fabric as is technically possible. 93 A desire to retain authenticity tends to suggest that any deliberate change to a significant place should be distinguishable, that is, its extent should be discernible through inspection. The degree of distinction that is appropriate must take account of the aesthetic values of the place. In repair and restoration, a subtle to suggest that any deliberate change difference between new and existing, comparable to that often adopted in the presentation of damaged paintings, is more likely to retain the coherence of the whole than jarring contrast. 94 Integrity (literally, ‘wholeness, honesty’) can apply, for example, to a structural to a significant place should be system, a design concept, the way materials or plants are used, the character of a place, artistic creation, or functionality. Decisions about recovering any aspect of integrity that has been compromised must, like authenticity, depend upon a comprehensive understanding of the values of the place, particularly the values of what might be lost in the process. distinguishable, that is, its extent 95 Every place is unique in its combination of heritage values, so, while it is technically possible to relocate some structures, their significance tends to be diminished by separation from their historic location. There are exceptions, for example public sculpture not significantly associated with its current site, or moving a structure back from an eroding cliff edge, thus recovering its intended should be discernible through relationship with the landform. Relocated structures may also acquire new values in a new location. 45 inspection.. In repair and restoration, a subtle difference between new and existing..is more likely to retain the coherence of the whole than jarring contrast. ©
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