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Driving Student Success in a Global Economy
 

Driving Student Success in a Global Economy

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    Driving Student Success in a Global Economy Driving Student Success in a Global Economy Presentation Transcript

    • K12 EXECUTIVE SYMPOSIUMDriving Student Success in a Global EconomyDr. Rudy CrewWednesday, Oct. 12, 2011
    • GOALS
      Where is learning going?
    • ADP benchmarks for the end of high school highlight the skills needed for success in postsecondary education and work. The benchmarks are cumulative, describing what students need to learn by the end of high school.
      Cross-disciplinary proficiencies infused throughout the ADP benchmarks:
      • Research and Evidence Gathering
      • Critical Thinking and Decision Making
      • Communications and Teamwork
      • Media and Technology
      National and Global Context
    • Globalization & New Networks for Learning
      • E-Learning
      • Water Desalination
      • Bio-Engineering
      • Green Technology Development
      Access to jobs and future employability of our students in large measure is a function of new network connects for students and schools.
      TRENDS
    • The role of leadership has become more complex: District and school leaders are tasked with preparing students for jobs that don’t yet exist; using technologies that have not been invented.
      Projected Distribution of Workers Across Major Industries: 2008 and 2016
      JOB SEGMENTS
    • Network for parents, students, communities and schools.
      By E.D. Hirsch
      Hirsch concludes that this decline has not resulted from a lack of technical skill or of knowledge, but rather from a lack of shared information.
      Cultural literacy may be defined as the general information a person needs to understand a major newspaper. It is what literate, adult Americans expect others to know. This information need not be detailed, but without it, communication is filled with troubling gaps for the reader....
      STRATEGY
    • K-16 SYSTEMS NEED TOOLS FOR STUDENT OCCUPATIONAL AND CULTURAL LITERACY
      • Mass Notification and Communication
      • Skill Enhancement, Certification and Graduation
      • Leadership
      To create sustainable (policy, structure and vision) settings in which students routinely build social capital; teaching and technology are mutually dependent resources; and students skills are linked to the national and global marketplace.