Road to Success in Online Learning
 

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All Berkeley College Online students are enrolled in Road to Success in Online Learning ...

All Berkeley College Online students are enrolled in Road to Success in Online Learning
(RTS), which is a prerequisite to registering for online courses. RTS was
designed to evaluate and determine students' motivation, commitment and ability
to function effectively in Blackboard. Instructional Design Theory was used in
order to offer explicit guidance to online students to help them better learn
and develop in an online course. This webinar will explore how Berkeley College
Online implemented Instructional Design best practices and theory in order to
better determine students' chances for success in an online learning environment
in Blackboard.

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Road to Success in Online Learning Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Road to Successin Online LearningLoren KleinmanInstructional DesignerBerkeley College
  • 2. Agenda• Welcome & Housekeeping• Introductions• Define Instructional Design (ID)• Define Instructional Design Theory (IDT)• Explore how Berkeley College Online implemented IDT in conjunction with an ID model to design Road to Success• Q&A 2
  • 3. Instructional Design & Course Preparation• Instructional Design Theory was used in order to offer explicit guidance to online students to help them better learn and develop in an online learning environment within Blackboard (a learning management or content management system). 3
  • 4. Starting Off with Best Intentions 4
  • 5. Understanding Theory Source: “The Rapid E-learning Blog. (April 3 2012). Retrieved from http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/ 5
  • 6. What is Instructional Design Theory?• “Instructional design theory is a theory that offers explicit guidance on how to better help people learn and develop” (Reigeluth, 1999). – Types of learning and development can be cognitive, social, physical, emotional, etc. 6
  • 7. ID Helps People Learn Better Source: “The Rapid E-learning Blog. (April 3 2012). Retrieved from http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/ 7
  • 8. What does the research say?• Studies demonstrate that “online learning environments provide an interaction space that allows students to actively engage in critical dialogue and reflect on information in a way that facilitates knowledge construction and higher order thinking” (Jonassen, Carr, & Yueh, 1998 qtd in Quitadamo and Brown, 2001 ). 8
  • 9. Criticism• Quitadamo and Brown (2001) do agree, though, that despite the importance of creating a successful online learning environment there is no “comprehensive understanding of what factors influence successful student learning in online domains.” 9
  • 10. What is Road to Success (RTS)?• All Berkeley College Online students are enrolled in Road to Success in Online Learning (RTS), which is a prerequisite to registering for online courses. 10
  • 11. What is the Purpose of RTS?• RTS was designed to evaluate and determine students’ motivation, commitment and ability to function effectively in an online learning environment within Blackboard or a learning management system. 11
  • 12. Designing RTS:Many Makes and Models• There are many instructional design makes and models:• ADDIE Model – Kemps Instructional Design Model – Gagnes Nine Events of Instruction – Blooms Learning Taxonomy 12
  • 13. RTS & The ADDIE Model Figure 1. The ADDIE model is only meant to suggest the activities at each phase - Its a guide, not a blue-print. 13
  • 14. Criticism• The ADDIE instructional design model is sometimes criticized for being liner, systematic, constraining, or inflexible. To address these criticisms, there are many other instructional design models that have been developed to be more iterative, and holistic (Tzanis 2000). 14
  • 15. Analyze: Phase 1• Overall goals and scope (Tzanis 2000). – Find out who your learners are – The overall goals you are trying to achieve – The overall knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that need to be taught – The amount and level of content needed – Resources required/available 15
  • 16. STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: GENDERYOUR RESPONSE:THE DATA: 16.4 83.4 0.2 MALE FEMALE NO RESPONSE Note: Data is collected from random Fall 2011 sources on a non-empirical basis and may reflect averages rather than statistical analysis to obtain results.
  • 17. STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: AGEYOUR RESPONSE:THE DATA: 0.2 0.2 4.1 5.9 5.0 9.7 27.5 29.7 16.0 1.7 <=17 18 19 20 21 22 23-24 25-29 30-39 40+ Note: Data is collected from random Fall 2011 sources on a non-empirical basis and may reflect averages rather than statistical analysis to obtain results.
  • 18. STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: GENERATIONAL MIXYOUR RESPONSE:THE DATA: 29.7 54.3 16.0 GenX Millenials GenX/Baby Boomers Note: Data is collected from random Fall 2011 sources on a non-empirical basis and may reflect averages rather than statistical analysis to obtain results.
  • 19. Design: Phase 2• User characteristics, specific objectives, learning & media strategies (Tzanis 2000). – How will the content and activities be sequenced, presented and reinforced? – What are the objectives of each session/unit? – What skills or outcomes are you hoping to achieve for each? – What methodology will you use to achieve each objective? – What media/resources will be used in the instruction? – How will you assess the students understanding of the material? 19
  • 20. The Design• Learning Modules• Adaptive Release 20
  • 21. Develop: Phase 3• Production of instruction (Tzanis 2000). – The development stage of the ADDIE model deals with building the course itself. This stage focuses on putting the theories and questions to bed and creating concrete manifestations. 21
  • 22. Navigation 22
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  • 27. Collaboration• Academic Affairs• Instructional Design• Student Feedback 27
  • 28. Implement: Phase 4• Conducting the course (Tzanis 2000). – Implementation is the actual delivery and teaching of the course itself. The implementation requires that the elements of the learning environment be identified and teaching strategies developed. 28
  • 29. Evaluate: Phase 5• Evaluating success and collecting data (Tzanis 2000). – Evaluation of the experience is the last stage of the ADDIE model. It provides information that should be used in any modifications to the course. Evaluation is best done when an independent evaluator takes notes and details issues for resolution. 29
  • 30. Feedback Taking an Online course is easier than taking an on site course. 0% 7% 16% Strongly Agree 52% Agree 14% Disagree Strongly Disagree Neither Agree nor Disagree No Answer 11% 30
  • 31. Feedback continued This workshop helped me determine if taking an online course is right for me. 1% 2% 11% 4% Strongly Agree 54% Agree Disagree 28% Strongly Disagree Neither Agree nor Disagree No Answer 31
  • 32. Feedback continued This workshop is a waste of time. 0% 0% 5% 2% 18% Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Neither Agree nor Disagree 75% No Answer 32
  • 33. Food for Thought• Technology alone cannot support student engagement and success, but the construction of a suitable online learning environment that integrates good design can promote cognitive abilities, higher order thinking, and critical discourse. 33
  • 34. Q&A• How do you think you can apply IDT to your online course development?• Other questions?? 34
  • 35. Questions about the presentation? Contact Loren Kleinman, Instructional Designer Phone: 973-278-5400 (ext. 1651) Email: loren@lkeditorial.com Twitter: @LK_Editorial Or Michael Samman, Director of Online Faculty Support Email: mls@berkeleycollege.edu Questions about Blackboard? Contact Blackboard Professional Education Phone: 888-719-6123 Email: ProEdInfo@blackboard.com www.blackboard.com/careercolleges Twitter: @Bb_For_Profit 35
  • 36. References• Tzanis, J. (2000). ADDIE Model. Retrieved from http://www.tzanis.org/Courses/ADDIE/• ADDIE MODEL. Retrieved from http://www.about-elearning.com/addie- instructional-design-model.html.• Graphical Process Map-NYU. Retrieved from http://www.tzanis.org/Courses/ADDIE/NYUproc ess.gif. 36
  • 37. References continued• The Elephant Metaphor. Retrieved from http://usablelearning.wordpress.com/category/i nstructional-design/ 37