The Good Life: Easy Learning, Easy Tutoring, Easy Administration
 

The Good Life: Easy Learning, Easy Tutoring, Easy Administration

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  • SIS – changing programme codes etc….changed the view for students, removed their archived courses, lots of unintended consequences that were actually unknown consequences.UDOL – technically pretty self sufficient, that is we have a lot of skills in the department, but the university assumed that we could support ourselves, that we weren’t contributing to central services and therefore weren’t entitled to support!
  • Portal – moving away from a portal where learning is the poor relation to the portal where learning is centralMobile – an assumed given for an online provider. Online users are different in their needs, changing the way that we use our platform

The Good Life: Easy Learning, Easy Tutoring, Easy Administration The Good Life: Easy Learning, Easy Tutoring, Easy Administration Presentation Transcript

  • The Good Life:Easy Learning, EasyTutoring, Easy AdministrationSandra Stevenson-Revill & Dr Esther JubbUniversity of Derby10 April, 2013
  • 2About the University of Derby• Centralised Culture• Experience of Online Delivery• Strategic decision to support online deliverydifferently– 2008/9 development of an support structure– 2011 creation of separate business unit: Universityof Derby Online Learning (UDOL)– 2012 growth of organisation and academic teamresponsibility for development and delivery of onlineprogrammes
  • 3• Creation of UDOL– What will this mean for IT provision?– What will they want?– Will it differ from the current setup?– How will we provide this?
  • 4• Initial requirements gathering– Review of VLE provision– Identification of gaps in provision• Review of curriculum – assessment ofresources• Establishment of delivery model– Senior Online Tutors = Programme Managers– Remote Online Tutors
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  • 7• Enhancedfunctionality• Look and feel• Flexibility• DifferentEverything!Review of VLE and other IT requirementsBut what does thatmean?Process of rearticulationDevelopment of aframework for requests
  • 8• Turning on native functionality• Templates• Roles and permission sets• New user types• New spacesInitial Diagnosis and Solutions
  • 9• Flexible delivery of online content• Upgrade to Sp8• ‘UDOLising’ the environment– Functionality– Templates– Roles– Tutor AllocationTaking Advantage of the Summer Upgrade
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  • 11
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  • 13• Bespoke functionality saved our lives!– Add tutor• Understanding the real impact of our SIS– Granularity• Support• Where did we have the issues?Delivery and Ownership
  • 14• Lessons learned from 1st Delivery• New development framework– Lead times for all development Bb, Curriculum, Structural/Institutional
  • 15• New Online Student Portal• Bb Mobile Learn• Summer Upgrade– Retention centre & reporting– Calendar– Inline Assessment– Discussion boardsNature or Nurture
  • 16The Good Life: What have we learned?• Bb is rarely the problem– It’s what you put around it– How you choose to use it• Articulate what you need….clearly• Evaluate what you’ve done• No additional resource was needed
  • 17Any Questions
  • 18Sandra Stevenson-RevilleMail: s.revill@derby.ac.ukDr Esther JubbeMail: e.jubb@derby.ac.ukContact Details