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Power Searching for Business Journalists by Daniel M. Russell

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Google senior research scientist Daniel M. Russell presents "Power Searching for Business Journalists," a free, one-hour webinar hosted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business …

Google senior research scientist Daniel M. Russell presents "Power Searching for Business Journalists," a free, one-hour webinar hosted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalists.

For more information on training for journalists, please visit businessjournalism.org.

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  • 1. Power Searching for Business JournalistsDaniel M. RussellŰber Tech Lead Google Search Quality & User Experience Researchdrussell@google.com © 2013 1
  • 2. What’s the phonenumber of theoffice this imagewas taken from? 2
  • 3. Work with what you have…•  I searched for [tp office building] … voila!•  You can also figure this out by doing an Image search for [ tp ]•  Knowing this, I could easily get the street address for the TP building: 14/16 Twarda Street, Warsaw And once you know that… 3
  • 4. 4
  • 5. Now, which office are you in? Search [google offices warsaw] to find that the information is at: http://www.google.com/about/company/address.html Google Warsaw Warsaw Financial Center Emilii Plater 53 00-113 Warszawa Poland Phone: +48 22 207 19 00 Fax: +48 22 207 19 21 5
  • 6. What’s the length of What date was thisthe runway? picture taken? 6
  • 7. Use what you’ve got… •  If you do a simple quoted search: [ “DQ-TRI” ] … is a plane that was in the service of Air Fiji. •  Why use the quotes? Without them you end up with far too many off-topics hits. DQ and TRI both have multiple meanings. But together in a phrase... they can only mean one thing. 7
  • 8. Once you have the plane… •  To get the rest of the story, you can check the Wikipedia page for Air Fiji. The company started in 1967, but foundered in 2009, selling off all 5 planes in its fleet. •  Taveuni, Fiji, you’ll find it’s at 16°41’26″S 179°52’37″W, 8 and the runway is 910m or 2,986ft.
  • 9. How to figure the photo date? •  Check Dan Russell’s personal G+ photo albums. •  Divers in the photos include Harry Saddler, Dan Russell, Tom Gruber, Richard Santucci ["Harry Saddler" OR "Dan M. Russell" OR "Tom Gruber" OR "Richard Santucci" Fiji] •  Pic by Tom on TraveloCafe…. •  Clicking on the picture goes to Flickr, where this picture is part of a set taken in Fiji, which ranges between 16 March 2004 and 23 March 2004. 9
  • 10. But this is all second nature… 10
  • 11. term AROUND(n) term[ “jerry brown” AROUND(9) “tea party” ] 11
  • 12. Most of what you know about Boolean is wrong •  AND doesn’t do anything –  The story is subtle… don’t worry about it –  All terms are “soft ANDed” together •  OR allows you to express synonyms –  [ “pertusiss” OR “whooping cough” ] –  [ “abestosis cancer” OR “mesothelioma” ] •  NOT doesn’t do anything –  … really, except search for the term ‘not’ –  If you want to exclude, use minus ( - ) 12
  • 13. Boilerplate / repeated language [ “pertusiss” OR “whooping cough” “confirmed cases” OR “new cases” ] [ “Smith denied” OR “Smith claimed” OR “Smith argued” ] [ “postive findings” OR “confirmed cases” OR “positive results” ] 13
  • 14. Goals 1.  Skills that you can use for your own searches define: filetype: site: Control-F antireading Search-by-image… 2.  Deep strategies for search 3.  How to quickly come up to speed on a topic 14
  • 15. The punch lines, up front from previous studies… •  Many repeated queries… even by experts –  ESPECIALLY when they’re having a bad experience •  Many cases of early commitment to a single solution path –  with subsequent ratholing on a poor path •  Little evidence of any deep search strategies –  e.g., changing the resources being sought; validating the answers; checking alternative resources •  Satisficing behavior dominates. –  People look for the first answer, not necessarily the best answer •  Sometimes, you gotta have exactly the right search term –  Google’s syns are excellent… except when they don’t work
  • 16. What do you need to know about search to be good at it? 1.  What’s out there to be found? 2.  Where is content located? How’s it organized? 3.  Search tactics / search skills 4.  Search strategies / how to frame question, when to stop, when to switch approaches 16
  • 17. Skill 1: Control-F to find a word on the page •  Does the California Vehicle Code regulate the use of “pocket bikes” on roads? •  [ California Vehicle Code ] 17
  • 18. It’ll look like this… •  It’s 65 pages long •  Is the phrase “pocket bike” used here? 18
  • 19. 19
  • 20. Control-F aka CMD-F aka Edit>Find 20
  • 21. Control-F 21
  • 22. NOTE! 22
  • 23. Opened floodgate in Morganza spillway in Louisiana onMay 15, 2011 © 2011 Google, GeoEye
  • 24. 25
  • 25. 27
  • 26. 28
  • 27. 29
  • 28. 30
  • 29. http://followyourworld.appspot.com/ 31
  • 30. Key lesson 1 Expert searchers know the capabilities of their tools. They know what’s possible. 32
  • 31. * Finding and using other resources Someone told me that in the mid-1800’s, people often would carry around a special kind of notebook. They would use the notebook to write down quotations that they heard, or copy passages from books they’d read. The notebook was an important part of their education, and it had a particular name. Question: What was this kind of notebook called? 33
  • 32. Answer •  This is a really hard question. The best way to answer it is to first look for a reverse dictionary. [ reverse dictionary ] 34
  • 33. •  Then, go to the reverse dictionary http://www.onelook.com/reverse-dictionary.shtml … and type in the words [ notebook quotations ] then look thru the list of words it shows you.•  Answer: “commonplace book” 35
  • 34. Search / Visualize Public Data 36 http://www.google.com/publicdata/
  • 35. Search, Visualize, and Upload datasets 37 http://www.google.com/publicdata/
  • 36. Search / Visualize Public Data World Development Indicators (World Bank) Human Development Indicators (United Nations Development Programme) April 2011 World Economic Outlook (International Monetary Fund) OECD Factbook 2010 (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) Unemployment in Europe (monthly) (Eurostat) Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices in Europe (Eurostat) Minimum Wage in Europe (Eurostat) Broadband penetration in Europe (Eurostat) Government Debt in Europe (Eurostat) Road Transport in Europe (Eurostat) Food supply chain monitor (Eurostat) Tourism (Eurostat) Infectious Disease Outbreaks (HealthMap.org, Harvard Medical School) Global Broadband Performance (Net Index by Ookla) Broadband performance (Measurement Lab) UNECE Statistics Division (UN Economic Commission for Europe) Unemployment in the U.S. (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics) GDP and Personal Income of the U.S. (annual) (U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis) GDP breakdown of the U.S. (quarterly) (U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis) State Government Finances in the U.S. (U.S. Census Bureau) Retail Sales in the U.S. (U.S. Census Bureau) Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the U.S. (NCHHSTP powered by CDC WONDER) Mortality in the U.S. (NCHS, OAE powered by CDC WONDER) Cancer cases in the U.S. (CDC, NCI and NAACCR powered by CDC WONDER) U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by State, Economic Sector, and Gas (World Resources Institute) 38 Energy by State (Energy Information Administration) Prices for Natural Gas (Energy Information Administration) Federal Government Finances of the U.S. (Office of Management and Budget)
  • 37. Key lesson 1 Expert searchers know the capabilities of their tools. They know what’s possible. - Google Earth - Public Data Explorer - Medline -… 39
  • 38. Key lesson 2 Expert searchers use more than one resource. 40
  • 39. * Think about synonyms—choosing keywords •  When an artist is making a sculpture for a client, they often make a small version of the sculpture in wax or clay. They’re usually a preliminary sketch, presented to the client for approval •  Question: What is this thing called? 41
  • 40. Answer •  [ small artist model ] – read through the snippets to find definition But… double check, you can use Google as a dictionary: [ define maquette ] 42
  • 41. Using more than one resource… •  Nearby there’s a very famous statue that’s clad with an exterior of steatite that’s placed in very, very prominent location. His right hand points to the strip of sand I was on; a world-famous beach that’s famed in song and story. What beach am I on? 43
  • 42. Using more than one resource 1.  [ define steatite ] à soapstone 2.  [ statue covered soapstone ] à “Christ the Redeemer” 3.  View “Cristo Redentor” in Google Earth (or Maps) to direction 44
  • 43. 45
  • 44. Draw line… •  Right hand points to Ipanema and Copacabana 46
  • 45. •  IpanemaIpanema   47
  • 46. Streetview:Copacabana 48
  • 47. Key lesson 2 Expert searchers use more than one resource. - using multiple resources - linking results 49
  • 48. Key lesson 3 Expert searchers deeply understand their language, especially synonyms. 50
  • 49. Keep looking! Think of synonyms! •  Sometimes you need to keep trying, thinking your problem through in different ways. Usually, if you think about how someone else would describe the thing you’re looking for, that will suggest search terms for you. 51
  • 50. Synonyms: Side-effect of framing •  Question: A friend told me that there is an forgotten city in the waters of San Francisco Bay. Is that true? If it IS true, what was the name of the supposed city? 52
  • 51. Answer •  Yes, it’s true… there IS an abandoned city near what is now Fremont. It was called Drawbridge. •  The trick here is to think about other ways of describing an “abandoned city”—don’t just assume that’s the best way to describe it. Try this search: [ ghost town san francisco bay ] The former town of Drawbridge 53 (Story about [ abandoned city ] )
  • 52. BIG POINT: Synonyms (the 3 Elses) •  When you’re failing at a search: –  Sit back and figure out how ELSE you can say it… –  How would someone ELSE talk about what you seek? –  It’s not about your language, it’s about someone ELSE! 54
  • 53. Another way to syn… •  Or… use the Reverse Dictionary w/ [ abandoned city ] •  Or… try Related Searches –  Explore the concepts –  Look for synonyms –  Related searches 55
  • 54. •  f 56
  • 55. •  v 57
  • 56. * Think about synonyms within language variants •  You know that when you eat pig, the meat is called “pork.” When you eat sheep, the meat is called “mutton.” When you eat deer, the meat is called “venison.” •  Consider shift in language from place-to-place –  PIN (property identification number) differs by state –  creek, run, stream, brook, burn, rivulet… 58
  • 57. Question: •  Suppose you visit your cousin in Sydney, Australia and they serve grilled kangaroo. What’s another word for “kangaroo meat”? 59
  • 58. A solution… •  [ kangaroo meat name ] •  Simplest possible solution, leads to Wikipedia article 60
  • 59. Consider regional variations: •  Don’t have to tell you about UK vs. US English (bonnet = windshield, etc.) •  But US regional variations can be impressive: –  branch, brook, beck, burn, creek, crick, gill (occasionally ghyll), kill, lick, rill, river, syke, bayou, rivulet, streamage, wash, run or runnel. 61
  • 60. Learning how to read… again •  Anti-reading: Looking for terms you don’t know
  • 61. SERP Reading… Does Palo Alto recycle milk cartons? •  v 63
  • 62. Big lesson… •  … you CANNOT just read the snippet and understand the story… 64
  • 63. Use of define •  Example: [ define loxodrome ] [ define Mollweide projection ] 65
  • 64. •  f 66
  • 65. Key lesson 3 Expert searchers deeply understand their language, especially synonyms. - use of boilerplate language - how to read summaries - anti-reading 67
  • 66. Key lesson 4 Expert searchers understand the terms and key concepts AND know how to read the genre. 68
  • 67. Naming the un-namable While searching for information about plastic surgery, I wanted to know what to call… this…. Question: What’s this boundary between lip and skin called? 69
  • 68. Answer •  Start with the simplest search you can think of: [ boundary between lip and skin ] If it’s not right, you can always modify it. •  When I did this, I clicked on the first result. There’s a nice article there about something called the vermilion border •  Then I double checked on that by doing a [ define vermilion border ] 70
  • 69. * Use most obvious language •  What is this thing called?
  • 70. Try this query: [ bright spot in sky near sun ]Moral #1: when in doubt, describe the object-of-interest in the way you think others will…Moral #2: the first answer may-or-may-not be what you’re looking for… Evaluate the result wrt your search goal.
  • 71. Use images •  I was hiking in the woods nearby in March when I saw a pretty blue flower. It was about 3 feet high, and grew along the pathway in the middle of the woods in Henry Coe State Park. •  Question: Here’s the picture… can you tell me what the common and Latin name is of this flower? 73
  • 72. What are the common AND the Latin names of this flower? 74
  • 73. Wildflower images – answer WHY? Georeference •  Search: web for [ blue wildflowers henry coe ] –  Look for collections of pictures. Look for a matching / similar picture. •  Trick: add a context term to look for collections of pictures –  [ blue wildflowers henry coe album ] –  [ blue wildflowers henry coe image collection ] •  Answer: Ithuriel’s Spear (Triteleia laxa) –  AKA Grass Nut, Wally’s Basket… 75
  • 74. * Going deeper on a topic: Using domain language •  I kind of like that wildflower! What else can I find out about it of a horticultural or botanical nature? –  Where does it grow near my home? –  Does it like to live in the sun or the shade? –  What level of acidity does it prefer in the soil? –  Where can I buy this plant for my home garden? 76
  • 75. Answer •  I started with the Latin name because it’s the MOST specific term you can use. So I did a copy & paste from the previous search: [Triteleia laxa] and then started looking around. I quickly found that I could see it in Coe Park, near Morgan Hill. •  When I looked up the Wikipedia entry, I found that it likes shady conditions. I then checked my work by doing a search for [Triteleia laxa shady ] Sure enough, other places say the same thing. It checks out! 77
  • 76. * Using Maps •  Using Google Maps is a great way to find where something is. But suppose you want to find out how far APART two things are. Question: (a) Can you figure out how far the De Young museum is from the San Francisco train station? (b) Suppose you want to hike from the Yosemite Visitor’s Center up to Glacier Point. How would you figure out how far a hike that is? (c) Can you find a tool that will let you measure arbitrary distances on the map? (Example: that will let you measure the length of a path or trail that you define… not one that’s already given.) 78
  • 77. Answer •  Use maps with driving directions to get the rough distance from point to point. •  For Yosemite, you have to look for a map at the Yosemite Park website. •  Then… use the maps “Create a New Map” (under My Maps) 79
  • 78. 80
  • 79. Goal: Find a B&B that has a view of this fog… Must be in coastal range; within 10 miles of B&B; Near a long lake… Near the Googleplex…. 81
  • 80. 82
  • 81. 83
  • 82. Flying into JFK (from the east to west) What’s causing those rectilinear features ? 84
  • 83. How big are those features? •  Use Google Earth (or Maps) to zoom in with a measuring tool •  Realize that these aren’t CANALS, they’re more like DITCHES! 85
  • 84. 86
  • 85. Many tools for Maps to help your search •  Challenge: find and install the GPS location tool! –  Maps labs at bottom of Maps UI Metaquestion: How would you know? 87
  • 86. Lat/Long coords work as well •  (decimal coords): 13.861, 25.006 (aka Lat/Long: N 13 51.662, E 25 0.388) (aka Deg., Min., Sec.: N13 51 40, E25 0 23) 88
  • 87. You can see a lot just by looking… •  http://medievalnews.blogspot.com/2009/03/1000-year-old-fish-trap- found-with.html 89
  • 88. 90
  • 89. For our purposes, what can YOU find? 91
  • 90. “What’s around here?” 92
  • 91. What’s the news story… •  … now that you know what the company is, you can find associated news stories. •  With the map, you can identify the source of the company’s pollution, where it’s going, and who is (should-be) worried about it! 93
  • 92. Key lesson 4 Expert searchers know the capabilities of their tools. 94
  • 93. How to remove bogus results from your searches •  Sometimes you want to look up something that’s pretty common, so there are LOTS of web pages out there. It’s even worse when the word is really common. So how do you eliminate things you don’t want? •  Question: Can you find a great recipe for salsa to make for dinner tonight? IN PARTICULAR… your nephew is allergic to tomatoes. Can you find a salsa recipe without tomatoes in it? 95
  • 94. Example of minus use… removing •  The trick here is to remove all those “salsa as dancing” meanings. The quick way to do that in a web search is with the MINUS sign. [ salsa –dancing ] -- this will remove all the dancing references [ salsa –dancing –tomatoes ] – and the vegetables No s afte pace r min the us s ign! ! 96
  • 95. Quotes •  Use double quotes to search for an exact phrase [ when venus the goddess of beauty and love ] Vs. [ “when venus the goddess of beauty and love” ] 97
  • 96. * Finding a particular kind of document •  Your brother is a teacher at the local high school, and needs to find a lesson plan for a unit on superconducting materials. •  Question: Can you find a lesson plan for him? •  Hint: Look for a particular KIND of document… 98
  • 97. Answer •  Use the operator FILETYPE: to focus in just on presentations [ superconductor high school filetype:ppt ] •  Note that filetype: can take on ANY file extension – –  PDF, PPT, XLS, DOC, WMV, TXT, CSV, SKP, KMV, … (In fact, arbitary extensions… e.g., AQS) 99
  • 98. * Searching within a particular site •  Someone told me that I’d been quoted in the New York Times. OMG! What did I say that was quotable? •  Can you find a page in the New York Times where I (Dan Russell) was quoted? 100
  • 99. Answer •  Use the site: operator to search within a particular web site… [ “Daniel M Russell” site:nytimes.com ] … and see the number 1 hit. (Yes, I worked at IBM.) Answer: 1. Because “Daniel Russell” is a very common name. 2. The NYTimes has the convention of always spelling a person’s name out completely, including middle initials 101
  • 100. [ site:sec.gov query ] careful about EDU 102
  • 101. Key lesson 4 Expert searchers understand the terms and key concepts AND know how to read the genre. 103
  • 102. Key lesson 5 Expert searchers know the structure of their information space. 104
  • 103. Limit search by time… •  f 105
  • 104. To filter by time… select search tools •  f 106
  • 105. Then choose the time restriction… •  f 107
  • 106. Combine date restrictwith content type •  News / Blog / Forum / Web… 108
  • 107. Add time/date restrict •  Use preselected time/date options •  Can specify your own date range 109
  • 108. * Other advanced operators cache: If you include other words in the query, Google will highlight those words within the cached document. For instance, [cache:www.google.com web] will show the cached content with the word "web" highlighted. For instance, [cache:www.google.com] will show Googles cache of the Google homepage. Note there can be no space between the "cache:" and the web page url. 110
  • 109. Today’s page •  f 111 http://blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/
  • 110. Last week’s page: [cache: •  v 112 cache:blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/
  • 111. intitle: inurl: inurl: 113
  • 112. intext: requires that the text be in the body of page intext: 114
  • 113. Combing operators – site: with intext: [ site:stanford.edu “coral bleaching” intext:geophysics ] 115
  • 114. * Advanced search tool •  How to get to the advanced search UI 116
  • 115. Advanced Search UI 117
  • 116. #18: How to get page previews and cached copies 118
  • 117. 119
  • 118. Internet Archive / Wayback Machine 120
  • 119. * General principle: Look for tools Can you find a way to graph the equation: y = x2 + sin(x) 121
  • 120. … just type it directly into Google 122
  • 121. 123
  • 122. Mashupshttp://schoolperformancemaps.com/•  Combines data from multiple sources into single view•  To find mashups: [ mashup <topic>]•  Examples: [ mashup school performance ] 124
  • 123. Question: Can you find a mashup… •  .. That shows current emergency situations worldwide?
  • 124. •  Do the following search: [ mashup worldwide emergencies ]•  http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php?area=usa&lang=eng
  • 125. * Calculator / Conversions •  Can you figure out how to use the calculator on Google? –  Once you have figured it out try figuring these out! 1.  4 + 5 + 19 = ?? 2.  45023 / 34 + 5 / 29 = ?? 3.  Sin(0.5) ** 2 = ?? 127
  • 126. Calculator… answer •  f 128
  • 127. Conversions •  General pattern: [ number units1 in units2 ] 129
  • 128. Conversions •  Conversions: [ 212F in C ] [ 400 yards in miles ] [ 32 euros in USD ] [ 23 bushels in quarts ] [ 2 inches in Angstroms ] [ 23 cm in ml ] CAUTION: Won’t tell you when you’re incompatible….. 130
  • 129. Problem: How fast does the World’s Fastest Man run in MPH? •  Steps: 1.  What’s the current world record? 2.  Make the conversions 3.  Do the calculations 1. Use web search (news) to find out world record 2. Note that the record is in meters (100 meters) 3. Convert distance from meters to miles 4. Convert time from seconds to hours 131
  • 130. Or…. the extreme use case… •  Now 9.58 seconds 132
  • 131. Just to double check things you think you know… 133
  • 132. #21: Alerts http://www.google.com/alerts aka “standing queries” •  Scan news, groups, web, videos, comprehensive… •  Generate emails automatically –  Use in conjunction with advanced search techniques 134
  • 133. #22: Tools: Search web history •  Link in upper right corner of browser on home page (or: www.google.com/history ) 135
  • 134. 136
  • 135. Your web search history is searchable(if you have it turned on) 137
  • 136. Note synonym expansion(use quote to turn off) 138
  • 137. * Google Trends •  search volume patterns across specific regions, categories, time frames and properties [ Google Trends ] 139
  • 138. •  f 140
  • 139. Tools: Google Trends 141
  • 140. Hottrendshttp://www.google.com/trends/hottrends 142
  • 141. Trends [ football, basketball, baseball ] 143
  • 142. Lower half: filter by region •  f 144
  • 143. 145
  • 144. * And…. The rest of the world… 146
  • 145. Translated foreign pages
  • 146. Finding  pages  wri-en  in  other  languages   •  <<PIC  HERE>>     148
  • 147. Methods  to  find  informa7on  from  other  languages   1.  Go to the Google web search for that country. 2.  Use the built-in other-language tool 149
  • 148. 1.    Go  to  country’s  own  Google     •  Example:    Google.co.in   150
  • 149. Selec7ng  Hindi  from  the  home  page:    [  eurozone  ]     151
  • 150. Different  Googles  to  try…     •  Pay attention to the languages offered by each country’s localized version –  Google.co.za (S. Africa) –  Google.co.ke (Kenya) –  Google.co.id (Indonesia) –  Google.co.vt (Việt Nam) –  etc.... 152
  • 151. Excep7ons   •  Notes:     –  MOST  countries  use  Google.co.??  as  their  domain     –  BUT..  Some  are  Google.com.??    (e.g.,      Ghana:    Google.com.gh  )     –  SOME..    Are  Google.??    (e.g.,  Rwanda:    Google.rw  )       •  Not  possible  to  use  Google  to  search  some  domains:     –  Bhutan     –  MayoHe     –   etc…     –  But  you  CAN  use  the  site:yt    to  search  MayoHe  (YT)  or                  site:bt  to  search  Bhutan  (BT)   153
  • 152. •  Fastest  way  to  find  country  Google  access?     –  [  Google  <country>  ]     154
  • 153. 2.    Use  built-­‐in  other  language  tool     155
  • 154. Add  or  remove  language  as  you  wish   156
  • 155. #25: Video •  Video.google.com •  Youtube.com •  …you can find lots more •  Notes: –  Lots of junk on the public video sites… be careful of what you see –  Low quality –  Also lots of faked video. You can’t believe everything you see either. 157
  • 156. Video.Google.com YouTube 158
  • 157. So… when do you use Video.Google.com? •  What’s the use case for Video.Google.com? •  Answer: –  When need the control of the left-hand nav panel –  When you fail at YouTube search
  • 158. Every minute72+ hours of video are uploaded3 billionvideos watched every day70%of traffic is international
  • 159. Breaking news on YouTube – youtube.com/citizentube
  • 160. YouTube Trends – the “watercooler of the web” www.youtube.com/trends  
  • 161. YouTube Directyoutube.com/directYouTube Direct allows you to embed the uploadfunctionality of YouTube directly into your ownsite, enabling your organization to request,review, and re-broadcast user-submitted videoswith ease. News organizations can ask for 163citizen reporting.
  • 162. Email uploads: www.youtube.com/account 164
  • 163. For Schools: YouTube.com/edu •  f 165
  • 164. Time index: where t = time, m = # of minutes, s = # of secondse.g., http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNuA5alRilk#t=23m15s 166
  • 165. Images •  Images.google.com •  But remember than many sites have their OWN image collections. Especially When is this useful? A: When you ONLY true of newspapers, .gov, want photos from NASA, universities, NASA. libraries, etc. •  Example: –  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/index.html –  As an alternative [ Hubble images site:usgs.gov ] – in image search 167
  • 166. Creative Commons filtering on Google 168
  • 167. Even more images •  Flickr.com / PicasaWeb / G+ / Facebook –  A site of people sharing photos, tagging with terms –  Consider searching for likely tags •  Demo: [ chi2009 dan ] or [ chi2008 buxton ] •  Remember to think about searching for tags #chi2006 or chi2006 169
  • 168. Clever Images Trick •  What’s that part of the bike called?
  • 169. Go to Images, search for a diagram •  [ bike diagram ]
  • 170. What’s the topmost sail, first mast on a clipper ship?? •  [ ship sail diagram ]
  • 171. Search-by-image •  Suppose you have an image… … how can you figure out what it is? 173
  • 172. You can ask impossible questions… Where is this?
  • 173. Search by Image
  • 174. •  f 176
  • 175. I found this in the basement… what is it? 177
  • 176. Books 178
  • 177. •  Books.google.com –  scanned page images [ manta ray ]•  “Find in a library” 179
  • 178. •  f 180
  • 179. US Patents •  Google.com/patents •  Usually want to use advanced search here 181
  • 180. Scholar 182
  • 181. Scholar now contains legal opinions as well Change  type  here   183
  • 182. 184
  • 183. NEW! Data table search •  Can now (August, 2012) search for data tables directly 185
  • 184. 186
  • 185. 187
  • 186. •  v 188
  • 187. Search Features How do you know which ones there are? http://www.google.com/help/features.html http://www.google.com/insidesearch/tipstricks/index.html [ define moa ] – note this also includes non-dictionary terms [ movies palo alto ] [ movies Boston ] [ pizza near mountain view ] [ weather mountain view ] phone number and map (Place Page): [ kepler’s menlo park ] <ups tracking number> Flight numbers (to track a flight): [ AA 102 ] <etc etc etc> 189
  • 188. Question is… •  What’s indexed? •  Is all of Google’s content indexed on the Google Search Engine? ? Universal search means… what… to the average user? •  How does a searcher know what’s available, or even possible? •  Example: –  Find an online readable copy of Popular Science magazine, Nov 1955? –  Find a telephone directory from Rochester, NY 1920? –  Find a list of all the universities with an office in Washington, DC?
  • 189. Summary •  When in doubt, search it out! •  Your search skills will become stale quickly… …. keep tracking the new features that we offer! •  Practice deliberately. When you get the chance, try the same search a few different ways and note the differences. Ask why! 191
  • 190. Announcement: MOOCS •  July 10, 2012: Power Searching with Google V1 (154K) •  Sept 24, 2012: Power Searching with Google V2 (127K) 192
  • 191. •  f Jan 2 3 – Feb 8, 20 13 193
  • 192. Try out AGoogleADay.com 194
  • 193. Google Cheat Sheet PDF file •  http://dmrussell.net/search-education/mousepad-cheat-sheet.pdf

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