Thomas Dail and Jeannine AversaU.S. Bureau of Economic AnalysisJune 19, 2013Mining	  BEA	  Economic	  Data	  to	  Break	  ...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Begin?	  §  You	  might	  have	  a	  hunch	  about	  something	  that	  is	  happening	  in	  ...
www.bea.gov	  frOur	  Story	  §  Before	  we	  dig	  in,	  we	  want	  to	  tell	  you	  a	  liBle	  about	  ourselves.	 ...
www.bea.gov	  Our	  Story	  §  I’m	  Thomas	  Dail,	  and	  I’m	  a	  public	  affairs	  specialist	  at	  the	  BEA.	  	 ...
www.bea.gov	  Today’s	  Goals	  §  We	  will	  walk	  you	  through	  the	  types	  of	  local	  economic	  sta=s=cs	  BE...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Begin?	  §  From	  BEA’s	  public	  website	  (www.bea.gov),	  you	  can	  access	  a	  treasu...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Begin?	  §  Want	  to	  find	  out	  how	  much	  people	  in	  your	  state,	  county	  or	  m...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Begin?	  §  By	  analyzing	  BEA’s	  local	  economic	  data,	  you’ll	  be	  able	  to	  spot...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Begin?	  A	  sampling	  of	  our	  published	  reports:	  §  GDP	  by	  Metro	  Area.	  Sta=s=...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Begin?	  A	  sampling	  of	  our	  published	  reports:	  §  GDP	  by	  State.	  Sta=s=cs	  fo...
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  “Bad	  Luck	  and	  Hard	  Times	  on	  the	  Menu	  at	  a	  Bus	  Terminal	...
www.bea.gov	  Finding	  the	  Data	  §  We’re	  going	  to	  walk	  you	  through	  how	  to	  find	  this	  data	  point....
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  Eagle	  Ford	  gives	  region	  a	  shot	  in	  the	  wallet	  §  San	  Anto...
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  The	  reporters	  used	  BEA	  data	  as	  the	  basis	  for	  the	  story	  ...
www.bea.gov	  Finding	  the	  Data	  §  We’re	  going	  to	  walk	  you	  through	  how	  to	  find	  these	  data	  point...
www.bea.gov	  Exercise	  1	  §  Now	  it’s	  your	  turn.	  Find	  percent	  change	  in	  per-­‐capita	  personal	  inco...
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  “Wealth	  Rises	  in	  America’s	  Heartland”	  USA	  Today,	  Nov.	  27,	  2...
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  USA	  Today	  analyzed	  BEA’s	  per-­‐capita	  personal-­‐income	  data	  fo...
www.bea.gov	  Finding	  the	  Data	  §  We’re	  going	  to	  walk	  you	  through	  how	  to	  find	  these	  data	  point...
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  Houston	  tops	  list	  for	  fastest	  growth	  §  Houston	  Chronicle,	  F...
www.bea.gov	  Finding	  the	  Data	  §  We’re	  going	  to	  walk	  you	  through	  how	  to	  find	  these	  data	  point...
www.bea.gov	  Exercise	  2	  §  Now	  it’s	  your	  turn.	  Find	  overall	  real	  GDP	  growth	  for	  your	  metro	  a...
www.bea.gov	  2Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  “A	  Tricky	  Science,”	  Durango	  Herald,	  Oct.	  7,	  2012	  §  “The	  ...
www.bea.gov	  Anatomy	  of	  a	  Story	  §  Reporter	  dissects	  a	  regional	  economic-­‐impact	  study.	  Turns	  to	...
www.bea.gov	  Helpful	  Videos	  to	  Find	  Local	  Data	  	  §  You	  can	  find	  links	  to	  two	  videos	  on	  how	...
www.bea.gov	  Where	  to	  Find	  Us	  §  BEA’s	  Media	  Line:	  202-­‐606-­‐2649	  §  Jeannine	  Aversa,	  chief	  of	...
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Mining BEA Data to Break Local Stories by Jeannine Aversa and Thomas Dail (Texas)

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Jeannine Aversa and Thomas Dail present "Mining BEA Data," part of the free business journalism workshop, "Breaking Local Stories with Economic Data," hosted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and the Investigative Reporters and Editors.

This presentation focuses on the Texas region, however the tools and resources provided can be applied anywhere in the United States.

For more information about free training for business journalists, please visit businessjournalism.org.

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Mining BEA Data to Break Local Stories by Jeannine Aversa and Thomas Dail (Texas)

  1. 1. Thomas Dail and Jeannine AversaU.S. Bureau of Economic AnalysisJune 19, 2013Mining  BEA  Economic  Data  to  Break  Local  Stories      
  2. 2. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Begin?  §  You  might  have  a  hunch  about  something  that  is  happening  in  your  local  economy.  Or,  you  are  on  the  hunt  for  a  compelling  data  point  to  build  a  story  around.    §  Either  way,  if  you  are  willing  to  take  the  =me  to  analyze  BEA’s  interac=ve  database  of  local  economic  sta=s=cs,  the  odds  are  good  that  you  will  come  away  with  an  enterprising  story.    2
  3. 3. www.bea.gov  frOur  Story  §  Before  we  dig  in,  we  want  to  tell  you  a  liBle  about  ourselves.  §  I’m  Jeannine  Aversa,  I’m  chief  of  public  affairs  and  outreach  at  the  BEA.  Before  I  joined  the  bureau  in  September  2011,  I  worked  as  a  journalist  for  nearly  30  years.  For  more  than  a  decade,  I  was  The  Associated  Press’  chief  economics  writer,  covering  the  Federal  Reserve,  the  Treasury    Department,  the  IMF,  World  Bank  and  of  course  –  all  the  major  economic  indicators!    
  4. 4. www.bea.gov  Our  Story  §  I’m  Thomas  Dail,  and  I’m  a  public  affairs  specialist  at  the  BEA.    I  bring  a  dozen  years  worth  of  experience  in  newspaper  repor=ng  and  in  public  rela=ons.  Before  joining  the  bureau,  I  covered  poli=cs  and  business  for  Freedom  Communica=ons  in  North  Carolina  
  5. 5. www.bea.gov  Today’s  Goals  §  We  will  walk  you  through  the  types  of  local  economic  sta=s=cs  BEA  has  available  on  its  public  website  and  their  importance.  §  We  will  dissect  several  news  stories  using  BEA  sta=s=cs  and  tell  you  how  to  find  them.  §  We  will  ask  you  to  mine  BEA’s  database  for  specific  data  points.        
  6. 6. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Begin?  §  From  BEA’s  public  website  (www.bea.gov),  you  can  access  a  treasure  trove  of  local  economic  sta=s=cs  by  using  our  interac=ve  database.  §  Want  to  find  out  how  fast  your  local  economy  is  growing?  The  forces  suppor=ng  growth  or  restraining  it?  You’ll  want  to  analyze  Gross  Domes=c  Product  sta=s=cs    that  BEA  produces  by  state  or  metro  area.    6
  7. 7. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Begin?  §  Want  to  find  out  how  much  people  in  your  state,  county  or  metro  area  earn?  Which  industries  are  paying  more  or  less?    §  How  much  is  paid  in  Social  Security,  Medicare,  unemployment  insurance  and  other  government  benefits?    §   Then  you’ll  want  to  troll  through  our  income  sta=s=cs  by  state,  county  or  metro  area.  7
  8. 8. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Begin?  §  By  analyzing  BEA’s  local  economic  data,  you’ll  be  able  to  spot  trends  and  gather  historical  context.  You  might  unearth  data  points  that  run  counter  to  “conven=onal  wisdom”  –  useful  in  producing  a  myth-­‐bus=ng  story.    §  Before  you  dive  into  BEA’s  database,  you  probably  will  want  to  take  =me  to  scan  the  local  economic  reports  we  produce.  8
  9. 9. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Begin?  A  sampling  of  our  published  reports:  §  GDP  by  Metro  Area.  Sta=s=cs  for  2011.  Released  Feb.  22  §  State  Quarterly  Personal  Income.  Final  quarter  of  2012.    March  27  release  date.    Quarterly  sta=s=cs  for  2013  released  June  28,  Sept.  30  and  Dec.  19.    
  10. 10. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Begin?  A  sampling  of  our  published  reports:  §  GDP  by  State.  Sta=s=cs  for  2012.  Released  June  6.  §  Local  Area  Personal  Income.  Sta=s=cs  for  2012.    Nov.  21  release  date.    
  11. 11. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  “Bad  Luck  and  Hard  Times  on  the  Menu  at  a  Bus  Terminal  in  West  Virginia,”    §  The  New  York  Times,  May  11,  2011.  §  Uses  BEA  data  to  unearth  this  sta=s=c:  manufacturing  jobs  fell  by  nearly  40  percent  in  West  Virginia  since  1990.  §  Built  story  around  this  data  point  by  examining  the  ripple  effect  of  those  job  losses  on  the  West  Virginia  town  of  Weirton.      
  12. 12. www.bea.gov  Finding  the  Data  §  We’re  going  to  walk  you  through  how  to  find  this  data  point.    www.bea.gov      
  13. 13. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  Eagle  Ford  gives  region  a  shot  in  the  wallet  §  San  Antonio  Express-­‐News,  January  15,  2013  
  14. 14. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  The  reporters  used  BEA  data  as  the  basis  for  the  story  but  fleshed  it  out  by  talking  to  local  experts  and  regular  people.  §  The  average  county  per-­‐capita  income  in  the  Eagle  Ford  Shale  region  grew  13.62  percent  between  2008  through  2011.  Statewide,  per-­‐capita  personal  income  grew  1.34  percent  during  that  period.    
  15. 15. www.bea.gov  Finding  the  Data  §  We’re  going  to  walk  you  through  how  to  find  these  data  points.    www.bea.gov  
  16. 16. www.bea.gov  Exercise  1  §  Now  it’s  your  turn.  Find  percent  change  in  per-­‐capita  personal  income  for  your  county  for  2008-­‐2011.    §  Here  is  the  formula  for  percent  change:    Percent_Change  =    (Last_Year/First_Year)  –  1  §  What  does  this  figure  tell  us?    §  What  can  you  compare  it  to?  §  What  is  your  lead?    §  Who  would  you  talk  to  next?    
  17. 17. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  “Wealth  Rises  in  America’s  Heartland”  USA  Today,  Nov.  27,  2012.  §  Here’s  an  example  of  how  reporters  can  analyze  BEA’s  local  economic  data  to  produce  a  na=onal  story.  
  18. 18. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  USA  Today  analyzed  BEA’s  per-­‐capita  personal-­‐income  data  for  metro  areas  and  for  coun=es.    (Note:  USA  Today  adjusted  BEA’s  figures  for  infla=on.)      §   Bridgeport-­‐Stamford,  Conn.,  metro  area  had  income  of  $78,504  per  person  in  2011,  the  most  affluent  place  in  the  country  in  the  past  decade,  USA  Today  reported.    
  19. 19. www.bea.gov  Finding  the  Data  §  We’re  going  to  walk  you  through  how  to  find  these  data  points.    www.bea.gov  
  20. 20. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  Houston  tops  list  for  fastest  growth  §  Houston  Chronicle,  February  22,  2013    §  Based  on  the  metro  GDP  report  released  in  late  February,  the  author  spoke  to  a  local  expert  to  dig  into  the  details  of  the  local  story.  §  Infla=on-­‐adjusted  gross  domes=c  product  for  Houston-­‐Sugar  Land-­‐Baytown  increased  3.7  percent  in  2011.    
  21. 21. www.bea.gov  Finding  the  Data  §  We’re  going  to  walk  you  through  how  to  find  these  data  points.    www.bea.gov  
  22. 22. www.bea.gov  Exercise  2  §  Now  it’s  your  turn.  Find  overall  real  GDP  growth  for  your  metro  area  in  2011.  Which  industry  grew  fastest?  §  What  do  these  sta=s=cs  tell  us?  §  What  can  you  compare  them  to?    §  What  is  your  lead?    §  Who  would  you  talk  to  next?  
  23. 23. www.bea.gov  2Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  “A  Tricky  Science,”  Durango  Herald,  Oct.  7,  2012  §  “The  USA  Pro  Cycling  Challenge  brought  world  media  to  Durango  as  well  as  thousands  of  spectators.  But  it’s  unclear  how  much  special  events  such  as  the  bicycle  race  help  the  economy.”    –  Durango  Herald  
  24. 24. www.bea.gov  Anatomy  of  a  Story  §  Reporter  dissects  a  regional  economic-­‐impact  study.  Turns  to  BEA’s  User  Guide  on  “RIMS  II”  Regional  Input-­‐Output  Mul=pliers  to  help  analyze  and  truth  squad  a  study.  §  User  Guide  can  be  found  at  hBp://bea.gov/regional/rims/index.cfm      
  25. 25. www.bea.gov  Helpful  Videos  to  Find  Local  Data    §  You  can  find  links  to  two  videos  on  how  to  find  more  local  BEA  data  at  hBp://bit.ly/econdata13.  §  How  to  find  employee  compensa=on  by  industry  for  a  given  county  §  How  to  find  gross  domes=c  product  (total  goods  and  services  produced)  per  capita  in  a  metro  area  h"p://bit.ly/econdata13  also  has  videos  of  this  workshop  (from  Louisville)  handouts,  slides,  BLS  and  Census  videos,  and  other  resources.  
  26. 26. www.bea.gov  Where  to  Find  Us  §  BEA’s  Media  Line:  202-­‐606-­‐2649  §  Jeannine  Aversa,  chief  of  public  affairs  and  outreach.  Jeannine.Aversa@bea.gov.  202-­‐606-­‐9327  §  Thomas  Dail,  public  affairs  specialist.    Thomas.Dail@bea.gov.  202-­‐606-­‐9209  
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