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Indicator approach to understanding resilience of Socio-ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS)
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Indicator approach to understanding resilience of Socio-ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS)

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Presentation by Kaoru Ichikawa from UNU-IAS and the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI). …

Presentation by Kaoru Ichikawa from UNU-IAS and the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI).

This was presented during a seminar hosted at Bioversity International on 'The Indicators of Resilience in Socio-Ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS)' in January 2014.

Find out more: http://www.bioversityinternational.org/research-portfolio/agricultural-ecosystems/landscapes/


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  • 1. Seminar on Indicators Research 29 January 2014 Bioversity International, Rome, Italy Indicator Approach to Understanding Resilience of Socio-ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS) Kaoru Ichikawa and Wataru Suzuki United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability
  • 2. Contents 1. Socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes 2. The Satoyama Initiative 3. Indicators for resilience of SEPLS 2
  • 3. Socio-Ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS)  Harmonious interaction between people and nature  Support biodiversity while providing humans with the goods and services needed for their well-being  Dynamic mosaics of habitats and land uses  Deeply linked to local culture and knowledge 3
  • 4. Satoyama landscapes  Traditional agricultural landscape of Japan  Mosaics of farmlands, forests, grassla nds, irrigation canals and ponds, settlements, etc.  Nurtured habitats maintained through appropriate management  Multifunctional landscape produces a bundles of ecosystem services 4 Source: JSSA
  • 5. Socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) around the world Korea (Mauel) Spain (Dehesa) Philippines (Muyong) Cambodia (Srair-Chamkar) Malawi (Chitemene) © Setsuko Nakayama Home gardens © BM Kumar 5
  • 6. 6
  • 7. The Satoyama Initiative  Aims to realize “societies in harmony with nature” through mainstreaming biodiversity into production landscapes and seascapes  Promotes broader global recognition of the value of “Socio-Ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes” (SEPLS)  Initiated by Ministry of Environment, Japan, and UNU-IAS  Recognized by CBD COP in the area of sustainable use of biodiversity (Decisions of CBD COP10 and 11 X/32 and XI/25) 7
  • 8. International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI)  Established in 2010 at CBD COP10 in Japan  A global network to serve as a platform for sharing knowledge and fostering synergies among organizations working on SEPLS  A multi-stakeholder partnership consisting of organizations from national and local governments, NGOs, indigenous communities, private sector, academic, and international and UN organizations  Promotes and implements a wide range of activities at various levels 8
  • 9. IPSI Collaborative Activity on Indicators for Resilience of SEPLS o Resilience o Changes and shocks are inherent in ecosystems and societies o To minimize and avoid critical damage could be more reasonable and pragmatic o “The capacity of a system to absorb disturbances and reorganize while undergoing change so as to still retain essentially the same function, structure, identity, and feedbacks” (Walker et al. 2004)  Strengthening the resilience of SEPLS will contribute to the wellbeing of local communities. 9
  • 10. Indicator approach at national and global levels  Indicator approach plays an important role in monitoring progress toward specific targets and goals at national and global levels E.g. Aichi Biodiversity Targets, MDGs. Quantitative and scientifically valid indicators  Can be compared across space and time and aggregated into global data  Assessment conducted by experts  10
  • 11. The resilience indicators of SEPLS  Indicators to measure resilience of SEPLS at the local level  Measure different aspects that are entailed by and essential for sustaining resilient landscapes  A tool for local communities  to understand the status of their landscapes/seascapes  to identify ways to enhance resilience  to enhance participation and communication with different stakeholders  Assessment based on the local community’s understanding and perception 11
  • 12. Development of indicators (2011-) • A set of 20 indicators was developed by Bioversity International and UNU-IAS – Ecosystems protection and the maintenance of biodiversity – Agricultural biodiversity – Knowledge, learning, and innovation – Social equity and infrastructure • The indicators have been applied/tested – By Bioversity International in Cuba, Kenya, Nepal, and Bolivia – By UNDP at COMDEKS sites in Brazil, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, India, M alawi, Nepal, Slovakia, and Turkey • Discussed during previous IPSI global conferences 12
  • 13. Toolkit development (2013-)  To promote widespread use of the indicators in different contexts  Toolkit on practical application of indicators is being developed by Bioversity International, UNDP, IGES, and UNUIAS  Revision of indicators based on experiences of testing is also being undertaken Scoping workshop (Apr 2013) Expert workshop (Jul 2013) SBSTTA side event (Oct 2013)
  • 14. Toward achievement of global targets  Use of the indicators will contribute to  Understanding the resilience of SEPLS  Development of resilience-strengthening strategies  Enhancing communication among relevant stakeholders  Empowering local communities  Participatory approach  Local communities can engage in the whole process from monitoring, assessment, and strategy development, to actions.  Actions that are suitable and beneficial to the local context can be made.  Ultimately contribute to achievement of global targets such as Aichi Biodiversity Targets and MDGs/SDGs.
  • 15. Thank you for your attention!

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