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OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT
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OAA12 - Institutional responses to the changing environment: The case of UCT

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Laura Czerniewicz, Director, OpenUCT Initiative, University of Cape Town

Laura Czerniewicz, Director, OpenUCT Initiative, University of Cape Town

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  • http://survivingmyphd.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/post-journal-era.htmlPriem, J., & Hemminger, B. (2012). Decoupling the The PLoS One modelPLoS One is an open access journal which publishes work not according to what the editors and reviewers consider significant, but consider only the paper's methodological quality. They decoupled the significant approval from the methodological approval. PLoS One also decoupled copy-editing: they warn in advance that they don't copy-edit in details, and instead provide a list of services which do just that. This model has proven to be profitable: PLoS One published more than 5,000 papers in 2010 at 1350$ each (and the other PLoS journals charge even more). The flaws here, beyond the price, are the exclusivity: authors publish only in one journal, and the danger of a future with only a few mega-journals.Post-publication review servicesThere are  a few existing post-publication peer review services, the best-known of them are Faculty of 1000 (F1000) and Mathematical Reviews. F1000 "...identifies and evaluates the most important articles in biology and medical research publication." F1000 is supposed to function as additional help for researchers in managing their reading. It has actually been shown to identify quality papers which were overlooked by leading journals (Allen et al., 2009).scholarly journal Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, 6 DOI: 10.3389/fncom.2012.00019
  • McNay, I. (1995). From collegial academy to corporate enterprise: The changing cultures of universities. In T. Schuller (Ed.), The changing university. Buckingham: Society forResearch into Higher Education and Open University Press.A study of the relationship between institutional policy, organisationalculture and e-learning use in four South African universitiesLaura Czerniewicz *, Cheryl Brown in Computers & Education 53 (2009) 121–131
  • Rossiter, D. (2007) Whither e-learning? Conceptions of change and innovation in higher education. Journalof Organisational Transformation and Social Change. 4 (1), pp.93–107.From http://edoc.ub.uni-muenchen.de/5730/1/Wan_Yee-Tak.pdfStudent Expectations in the New Millennium —An Explorative Study of the Higher Education in Hong Kong, Dissertation, zurErlangung des Doktorgrades der Philosophie an derLudwig-Maximilians-UniversitätMünchen, vorgelegt von Yee-Tak Wan ausHongkong, LMU München, 2006
  • From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Cape_Town
  • There's a 'teaching input' subsidy that works on the basis of enrolled students (full-time equivalents, not just headcount). It's weighted by subject category, so an Engineering or Music student earns more than a regular Hum or Commerce student. Also weighted by academic level, but not in a very nuanced way. This element is by far the biggest of the overall teaching (as opposed to research-related) subsidy. The 'teaching output' subsidy funds graduate output, so this is the reward for success. But it's not very large, only about 14% of total teaching subsidy at present. It's calculated in a fairly complicated way but a university can improve the size of its slice of the cake by improving its grad output relative to other universities'. Overall, the output incentive is commonly said to be not large enough to persuade institutions to privilege success over access, but it's certainly not negligible. For a growth-averse institution like UCT, it's important. (Scott 2012,perscomm)Bear in mind that Masters (the research component) and doctoral grads are funded from a different pot, and output here is seen to be quite lucrative (tho no-one does the cost-vs-income sums properly)
  • Scholar to scholar and scholar to community- traditional sites of open access movementScholar student – traditional site of elearning
  • Intellectual Property policy and OERCreators of Open Educational Resources (OER) are to take note of and act in accordance with the newly-updated Intellectual Property (IP) policy of the University of Cape Town. The updated version now specifically addresses issues relating to the creation of OER resources and the licensing processes to be followed. The policy also now expressly states the support for publication of materials under Creative Commons licenses.In term of the updates, an Intellectual Property (IP) Advisory Committee is to be established to manage the processes relating to IP for UCT. Section 9 of the policy relates to creators of OER resources. It states that software development projects involving Open Source Licensing (OER) should, from the outset, submit the intended type of license agreement for review to the Research Contracts and Intellectual Property Services (RCIP) office for review in terms of compliance to South Africa’s Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Act and guidelines.Notable aspects of the updated policy also include IP related to the creation and licensing of films as a teaching learning medium/tool. Others are (Section 8.2): UCT automatically assigns to the author(s) the copyright, unless UCT has assigned ownership to a third party in terms of a research contract, in: Scholarly and literary publications Paintings, sculptures, drawings, graphics and photographs produced as an art form Recordings of musical performances and musical compositions Course materials, with the provision that UCT retains a perpetual, royalty-free, nonexclusive licence to use, copy and adapt such materials within UCT for the purposes of teaching and or research Film.
  • The second key concept is the power of individuals to make a positivecontribution to bringing about change. According to Giddens’‘structuration theory’ (1984), power resides in the meshing of individualaction with organisational structures; individuals can become ‘extendedprofessionals’ (Hoyle, 1969) and act strategically to make a positivecontribution to bringing about change (Somekh & Thaler, 1997)…
  • 6 interviewsScience. Engineering, Commerce and HumanitiesFrom Professors to LecturersPurposive sampling for range of faculty and rank3 who have not contributed- to find out why notAnd 3 who have contributed, to find out why and also why they feel their colleagues have not addedPilot study more to followTest Activity theory as a lens for understanding OER contribution and non-contributionPeer-reviewed, ISI accredited journalHodgkinson-Williams, C.A. & Paskevicius, M. (2012). The role of postgraduate students in co-authoring open educational resources to promote social inclusion: a case study at the University of Cape Town, Distance Education, 33 (2), 253-269. Also available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cdie20/33/2 Book chapterHodgkinson-Williams, C. A & Paskevicius, M. (2012). Framework to understand postgraduate students’ adaption of academics’ teaching materials as OER. In: Okada, A. (2012). Open Educational Resources and Social Networks: Co-Learning and Professional Development. London: Scholio Educational Research & Publishing. Available online: http://oer.kmi.open.ac.uk/?page_id=2337
  • Faculty contributions February 2010- March 2012
  • * Displays the most diverse number of authors per faculty - not necessarily the highest number of resources submitted by faculty
  • Transcript

    • 1. Institutional responses to thechanging higher education environment: the case of UCT Laura Czerniewicz 4 November 2012
    • 2. Open scholarship, open all content A HOLISTIC VIEW
    • 3. OPENING SCHOLARSHIP Open from the outset Open access shared & shareable, repositories for all Literature Reviews content Bibliographies Conceptual Frameworks Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Recorded interviews Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Images Open data Engagement Data Analysis Reports Audio recordsOpen education Interviews resourcesopen etextbooks Findings Books Massive open Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers online courses (MOOCs) Open journals and new publishing models
    • 4. An institutional culture perspective CHANGE
    • 5. INSTITUTIONAL CULTURAL TYPES Policy definition: Loose Collegium Bureaucracy Control of Control of implementation: implementation: Loose Tight Enterprise Corporation Policy definition: TightMcNay, I. (1995). From collegial academy to corporate enterprise: The changing cultures of universities.
    • 6. INSTITUTIONAL CULTURAL TYPES Policy definition: Loose Collegium Bureaucracy Control of Control ofimplementation: implementation: Loose Tight Enterprise Corporation Policy definition: Tight
    • 7. THE COLLEGIUM TYPE• Characterised by o loose institutional policy definition o informal networks and decision arenas o and innovation at the level of the individual or o department. (McNay 1995)• The organisational response o ’laissez faire’, few targeted policies or processes (Rossiter, 2007). o ore value of collegium is freedom• Defines organizational expectations in terms of freedom from external controls (Yee-Tak 2006)
    • 8. UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN• Oldest South African university o Top ranked African university • QS World University Rankings • Times Higher Education World University Rankings • Academic Ranking of World Universities• Medium sized o +/- 25 000 students o 982 permanent academics (of 5 442 total staff)
    • 9. PRESTIGIOUS RESEARCH UNIVERSITY • 5 Nobel Laureates • Booker Prize winner • Numerous internationally recognised research initiatives o Africa Earth Observatory Network (AEON o The Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, an international centre for research in the fields of cosmology and topology. o Department of Physics, home to the UCT- CERN research centre, o V involved in SKA (Square Kilometre Array)
    • 10. TEACHING AT UCT• Residential • Funding subsidy for headcount & throughput• Face to face (not curriculum or content)• Almost no distance ed • Centre for Higher• Not set up for “non- Educational Development traditional” courses active, strong academic development
    • 11. OPEN AGENDA AT UCT: PROJECTS Scholar Scholar Scholar Scholar Student Community2007 Opening Scholarship2008200920102011 Scholar20122013 Scholar2014
    • 12. HTTP://OPENUCT.UCT.AC.ZA
    • 13. OUR APPROACH TOTHE OPENNESS AGENDAin the light of UCT’s culture
    • 14. PRINCIPLES & STRATEGIES• Individual agency/ control• Maximum flexibility• Network & community building• Enabling, not requiring• Advocacy Collegium culture:• Champions & incentives loose institutional policy definition• Researching practices informal networks and decision arenas and innovation at the level of the individual or department McNay 1995
    • 15. HISTORICALLY• Opportunities for open agenda in the eLearning space rather than OA o Contributed to change strategy• No institutional repository
    • 16. MULTIPLICITY• Multiple strategies• Many small sites of innovation and activity, aiming for agglomeration across the institution, to achieve critical mass• Change at all levels of the university• Develop networks and build community
    • 17. ACADEMIC AGENCY• Decentralised uploading o Individual academics upload and maintain their resources directly• Pride of authorship o Quality assurance with the individual o Quality assurance part of broader teaching and learning systems, not separate• Minimal moderation o Copyright compliance
    • 18. FLEXIBILITY• Granularisation of resources important• Whole courses• Single resources o Ebooks o Presentations o Podcasts o Lecture notes o Animations o Images
    • 19. INSTITUTIONAL COMMUNITY• IP Law Unit• Knowledge Co-op• Citizen Science projects in COL• Enterprise Content Management Project• Eresearch• Library• Communications Office• Faculties
    • 20. ENABLING FRAMEWORK• Work enabled by new UCT IP Policy o Specifically addresses issues relating to the creation of OER resources and the licensing processes to be followed o Expressly states the support for publication of materials under Creative Commons licenses
    • 21. ADVOCACY
    • 22. CHAMPIONS• At senior level o DVC signs Cape Town Declaration (2008) o VC signs Berlin Declaration (2011)
    • 23. CHAMPIONS• Senior & middle level• OER Health Sciences - Dean
    • 24. CHAMPIONS• Bringing the work of “early adopters” above the radar
    • 25. CHAMPIONS & CHANGE• In our experience o Senior level support symbolic o Vertical relationships do not cause change per se, only when actual projects in place (eg HS) o Champions work best in horizontal networked relationships, building communities of practice• New roles and reconfigurations o The rise of the non-specialist “expert,” (or the “extended professional”)
    • 26. ENABLERS: SMALL GRANTS • 35 small grants in 2011 & 2012 • Up to R10 000 each • All faculties • To create and/ or adapt OER • Includes course level & smaller resources
    • 27. INCENTIVES: SMALL GRANTS
    • 28. OPENCONTENT GRANTS 2011/12FacultiesHumanities 11Health Science 8 TypeEngineering & BE 7 New course material 11CHED 3 New video 8Law 2 Adapting resources 16Science 1Commerce 1Other 2 35
    • 29. RESEARCH• Committed to researching practice o Cox, G (2012) Why would you do it, ... would a student actually be interested?” “Understanding the barriers and enablers to academic contribution to an OER directory”, OCW, Cambridge 2012 o Hodgkinson-Williams, C.A. & Paskevicius, M. (2012). The role of postgraduate students in co-authoring open educational resources to promote social inclusion: a case study at the University of Cape Town, Distance Education, 33 (2), 253-269.
    • 30. How we are doingUCT OPENCONTENT
    • 31. OPENCONTENT VISITS15 OCT 2011- 15 OCT 2012
    • 32. OPENCONTENT LOCATION OF VISITS 15 OCT 2011- 15 OCT 2012
    • 33. OPENCONTENT TRAFFIC & REFERRALS 15 OCT 2011- 15 OCT 2012
    • 34. 0 50 100 200 250 15001-201001-201102-201002-201103-201003-201104-201005-201106-201006-201107-201007-201108-201008-201109-201009-201110-201010-201111-201012-201011-2011 1-201212-2011 GROWTH TO DATE 2-2012 3-2012 Resources added Growth of total content
    • 35. FACULTY CONTRIBUTIONS Centre for Higher 11% Education Development 3% 24% Commerce Engineering and the Built Environment Health Sciences 8% Humanities34% 4% Law 16% Science
    • 36. TYPES OF RESOURCES Video 10% Audio 28%Text/HTMLWebpages 20% Audio Downloadable Documents Graphics/Photos Other Text/HTML Webpages Other Video 3% Downloadable Graphics/ Documents Photos 38% 1%
    • 37. CONCLUDING COMMENTS• A steady upswell rather than mainstream• Integration of resourcing requirements into existing structures• Acceptance of non-linear organic process• Slow approach more likely to be sustainable & effective• A research-based approach to inform strategy
    • 38. REFERENCES• Czerniewicz, L and Brown, C (2009) study of the relationship between institutional policy, organisational culture and e- learning use in four South African universities in Computers & Education 53 (2009) 121–131• McNay, I (1995) From collegial academy to corporate enterprise: The changing cultures of universities. In T. Schuller (Ed.), The Changing University. Buckingham: Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press• Rossiter, D (2007) Whither e-learning? Conceptions of change and innovation in higher education. Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change. 4 (1), pp.93–107• Yee-Tak , W (2006) Student Expectations in the New Millennium: An Explorative Study of Higher Education in Hong Kong, Dissertation, unpublished dissertation
    • 39. Laura Czerniewicz Laura.Czerniewicz@uct.ac.za OpenUCT Initiative: http://openuct.uct.ac.za/ UCT OpenContent : http://opencontent.uct.ac.zaCompanion site on Vula: https://vula.uct.ac.za/portal/site/openuct Follow us: http://twitter.com/openuct Presentations: http://www.slideshare.net/laura_Cz For slides 32-34 thanks to Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/za/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.

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