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  • The easiest and most concise way to describe the benefits of adopting Service Management and the ITIL Framework is by using the Objective Tree. Any organization has it’s known and inferred corporate objectives. Objectives can be related to revenue, costs, profits, satisfaction, production, etc. These objectives determine the business processes that are required. That is, the corporate objectives will determine how the functional units of the business work together and their activities. As an outsider looking in, if somebody asks why these activities are determined (why), then you would go back to the corporate objectives. Each of the units of the business requires a set of services in order to achieve their function and to be part of the business processes. What services are required are determined by the interactions of the business units. Some business units will require specific IT Services (e.g.. Accounts payable need a system, Human resources need a system), however some services will be required by all units (e.g.. Electronic mail and word publishing capabilities). The types of services required are influenced by the way that the business processes are organized, which (as we know) is determined by the organizational objectives. Finally, all of these IT Services must run on infrastructure. Infrastructure includes hardware & software and all elements in between. All of these components have to be managed and we call that Service Management (or IT Service Management). We must ensure that we managed all these components very well so that the services can be provided to the business processes that will help them achieve the organization objectives. ITIL is a way of identifying and assisting to ensure that we do all the things we need to do when considering the management of infrastructure. So you can see that ITIL is not the starting point. Really the starting point is understanding the objectives and business processes. Next is really understanding what it is that they need in the way of IT Services. The people in the business units do not view services as technical terms like network access,
  • MODULAR APPROACH- Service support and service delivery processes Not new stuff - COMMON SENSE- was thrown out with the bath water in the advent of decentralized dispersed technology management ITIL suggests processes to leverage decentralized capability and measure it Offers a common language and a way to set common expectations across IT units and then across the business units Walk through what these are - very briefly, Forte does 1&2 day courses- HD - process of incident management - resolving events in environment Config - managing all config items across business, storing them, integrating them, relationships between them in order to actively MANAGE them Problem Mgt - root cause of incidents, repeat problems Change Mgt - managing change into env proactively S/W C&D - housing centralized repository, integrating that with Change Mgt SLM - Metrics and relationship mgt Availability - managing access to tech for customers Capacity - managing growth of env. Cost - understanding them, educating customers, balancing cost/quality Contingency - Risk Mgt within env.
  • Each process consists of a set of defined processes. Each process has functions, critical success factors, and key indicators that align with varying levels of best practice implementation. An Baseline consists of conducting interviews with key staff using questions that focus on process processes. The processes associated with Change Management ensure that standardized methods and techniques are used for efficient and prompt handling of all changes so that change-related problems are prevented, and is broken down into the following seven processes: Receipt of request for change Change analysis and review by the CAB/IT executive committee Change notification and release Change building, testing, and implementation monitoring Change outcome notification Post-implementation evaluation Urgent change process
  • MODULAR APPROACH- Service support and service delivery processes Not new stuff - COMMON SENSE- was thrown out with the bath water in the advent of decentralized dispersed technology management ITIL suggests processes to leverage decentralized capability and measure it Offers a common language and a way to set common expectations across IT units and then across the business units Walk through what these are - very briefly, Forte does 1&2 day courses- HD - process of incident management - resolving events in environment Config - managing all config items across business, storing them, integrating them, relationships between them in order to actively MANAGE them Problem Mgt - root cause of incidents, repeat problems Change Mgt - managing change into env proactively S/W C&D - housing centralized repository, integrating that with Change Mgt SLM - Metrics and relationship mgt Availability - managing access to tech for customers Capacity - managing growth of env. Cost - understanding them, educating customers, balancing cost/quality Contingency - Risk Mgt within env.
  • To only consider new ITSM Processes, as defined by ITIL, can lead to a poor implementation. Failure to recognize other considerations shown in the “below the surface” portion can lead to a good idea, being sunk before it is started. In particular, the adoption of the ITIL Framework and new ways of working is something that affects the culture of the organization. Are you ready for change?, how willing will the people be to embrace the change?. Most people do not like change. What strategies do you need to put in place to overcome the resistance? Resistance is perhaps the single biggest challenge you will face. The clever thing to do is not to fight back when you encounter resistance. You know you will face it, so be ready. Don’t get involved in emotional arguments. It can take time to overcome resistance, but it is a normal part of life. Be patient be ready for the fact that the introduction of new processes can take several months. All through this time you must not let the passion you have for introducing new processes slip. If you think that others will share your vision you must be very careful as people will often say and act the way that they think you want them to. Then when you move to a different area, old habits return.
  • ITIL is now based on a core of five titles: Service Strategy Service Design Service Transition Service Operation Continual Service Improvement
  • MODULAR APPROACH- Service support and service delivery processes Not new stuff - COMMON SENSE- was thrown out with the bath water in the advent of decentralized dispersed technology management ITIL suggests processes to leverage decentralized capability and measure it Offers a common language and a way to set common expectations across IT units and then across the business units Walk through what these are - very briefly, Forte does 1&2 day courses- HD - process of incident management - resolving events in environment Config - managing all config items across business, storing them, integrating them, relationships between them in order to actively MANAGE them Problem Mgt - root cause of incidents, repeat problems Change Mgt - managing change into env proactively S/W C&D - housing centralized repository, integrating that with Change Mgt SLM - Metrics and relationship mgt Availability - managing access to tech for customers Capacity - managing growth of env. Cost - understanding them, educating customers, balancing cost/quality Contingency - Risk Mgt within env.

Slide 1 Slide 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Association of Information Technology Professionals – Lehigh Valley Chapter Presentation – November 28, 2007 ITIL – Information Technology Infrastructure Library The Means to Achieving IT Service Excellence Ray Hoving © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
  • Agenda
    • Your Comments & Questions
    • Implementation Considerations
      • Version 3 – Service Life-Cycle Emphasis
      • Version 2 – Process Maturity Emphasis
      • Version 1 – Best Practices Emphasis
    • Evolution of ITIL
      • How Can ITIL Help?
      • Transition from Applications Development to Infrastructure Operation
    • Infrastructure Service Management Challenges
  • Introduction to ITIL
    • ITIL - Information Technology Infrastructure Library
      • Developed in the 1980s by the Office of Government Commerce (OGC) in the United Kingdom
      • A non-proprietary approach for managing IT services
      • A pseudo public domain framework
    • Also referred to as ITSM - IT Service Management
      • Began as a set of best practices (Version 1)
      • Expanded into a process-led approach (Version 2)
      • Recently redesigned to a service lifecycle approach (Version 3)
        • Service Strategy
        • Service Design
        • Service Transition
        • Service Operation
        • Continual Service Improvement
      • Now considered the de facto standard for Infrastructure Service Excellence
    Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • © Ray Hoving Associates LLC Analogy APPLICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
  • © Ray Hoving Associates LLC The Underground Infrastructure Technology-enabled applications Computing, database, and telecommunications infrastructure
    • Design the application for operability and maintainability
    • Test and validate for reliability and consistency
    • Preparing the infrastructure to run the application
    • Implement and deploy for business benefit and cost effectiveness
    Transition from Development to Operation © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
  • Typical way to go to production Applications Design & Development © Ray Hoving Associates LLC Infrastructure Operation & Support
  • Transforming Systems to Services © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
    • Transportation service that gets you where you want to go per defined service levels
    • Car on the road with warranty, maintenance plan, insurance, etc.
    • Analogy:
    • A car
    • Functional utility, as seen by the customer, resulting from multiple applications and platforms
    • Maintained application operating on infrastructure platforms
    • Purchased or custom-developed software application
    Services Solutions Systems
  • Conflicting Roles © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
    • Lives with application until it dies
    • Moves on after application is built
    • Manage stability
    • Introduce change
    • Minimize operating costs
    • Minimize development costs
    • Emphasize operability
    • Emphasize functionality
    • Make generic platforms work
    • Make specific applications work
    • Deliver day-to-day services
    • Deliver one-time projects
    Infrastructure Operation Applications Development
  • A better way Process Bridge © Ray Hoving Associates LLC Infrastructure Operation & Support Applications Design & Development
  • Where ITIL fits in Quality Flexibility Cost management How / What ? Why! ITIL Source: ITIL Toolkit ORGANIZATI ON BUSINESS PROCESSES IT SERVICE PROVISION SERVICE MANAGEMENT effective efficient organisation effective efficient IT service provision
  • Evolution of ITIL © Ray Hoving Associates LLC Version 1 Best Practices Version 2 Best Practices Process Maturity Version 3 Best Practices Process Maturity Service Life-Cycle
  • ITIL Version 1 – Best Practice View Incident Management Configuration Management Problem Management Change Management Release Management Information Technology Infrastructure Library Source: ITSMF – The IT Service Management Forum Limited Service Level Management Availability Management Capacity Management Financial Management Continuity Management
    • Any event which is not part of the standard operation of a service and which causes, or may cause, an interruption to, or a reduction in the quality of that service
    Incident Management Why Incident Management? Incident Management Responsibilities:
    • To ensure the bests use of resources to support the business
    • To develop and maintain meaningful records relating to Incidents
    • To devise and apply a consistent approach to all Incidents reported
    • Incident detection and reporting
    • Classification of all Incidents, and initial support
    • Investigation and diagnosis
    • Resolution and recovery
    • Incident closure
    • Incident ownership, monitoring, tracking, and communication
    Source: ITSMF, Adapted by Ray Hoving
  • Incident Management Log Example: Here are some actual logged maintenance complaints by QANTAS pilots and the corrective action recorded by mechanics. Source: Unknown Cat installed Mouse in cockpit Reprogrammed radar with words Radar hums Aircraft warned to straighten up, fly right, and be serious Aircraft handles funny Engine found on right wing after brief search Number 3 engine missing Suspect you're right Suspected crack in windscreen IFF always inoperable in OFF mode IFF inoperative That's what they're there for! Friction locks cause throttle levers to stick DME volume set to more believable level DME volume unbelievably loud Evidence removed Evidence of leak on right main landing gear Cannot reproduce problem on ground Autopilot in altitude-hold mode produces a 200-fpm descent Live bugs on backorder Dead bugs on windshield Something tightened in cockpit Something loose in cockpit Autoland not installed on this aircraft Test flight OK, except autoland very rough Almost replaced left inside main tire Left inside main tire almost needs replacement Mechanics’ Corrective Action Pilot Maintenance Complaint
    • The unknown underlying cause of one or more Incidents becomes a Known Error when the root cause is known and a temporary or permanent fix has been identified
    Problem Management Why Problem Management? Problem Management Responsibilities:
    • To resolve Problems quickly and effectively
    • Prioritize Problem resolution based on business need
    • To proactively identify and resolve Problems and Known Errors, thus minimizing Incident occurrences
    • To improve the productivity of support staff
    • To provide relevant management information
    • Problem identification, classification, recording, investigation, and diagnosis
    • Error identification, assessment, recording, resolution, closure, and monitoring
    • Assistance with the handling of major Incident
    • Proactive prevention of problems
    • Obtaining management information from Problem data
    • Completing major problem reviews
    Source: ITSMF, Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • The process of identifying hardware and software configuration items (CI’s) required to operate and support the IT systems of the organization
    Configuration Management Why Configuration Management?
    • To account for all IT assets
    • To provide accurate information to support other Service Management processes
    • To provide a sound basis for Incident, Problem, Change, and Release Management
    • To verify records against infrastructure and to correct exceptions
    Configuration Management Responsibilities:
    • Planning
    • Identification
    • Control
    • Status Accounting
    • Verification and Audit
    Source: ITSMF, Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Efficient and proper handling of all changes in order to minimize the impact of any related incidences upon service
    Change Management Why Change Management?
    • Ensure standardized methods, processes, and procedures are used for all Changes
    • Facilitate efficient and prompt handling of all Changes
    • Maintain the proper balance between the need for Change and the potential detrimental impact of Changes
    Change Management Responsibilities:
    • Raising and recording Changes
    • Assessing the impact, cost, benefit, and risk of proposed Changes
    • Developing business justification and obtaining approval
    • Managing and coordinating Change implementation
    • Monitoring and reporting on the implementation
    • Reviewing and closing Requests for Change (RFCs)
    Source: ITSMF, Adapted by Ray Hoving
  • ITIL ® Process Approach Change Management Receipt of Request for Change Change Analysis and Review Change Notification and Release Building, Testing, & Impl. Monitoring Change outcome notification Process Change Outcome Notification Post-Implementation Evaluation Urgent Change Process Each process consists of sub-processes Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving ITIL® Baseline Sub-process Sub-process Sub-process Sub-process Sub-process Sub-process Sub-process
    • Check for completeness of RFCs
    • Return rejected RFCs with an explanation
    • Prioritize accepted RFCs
    • Classify accepted RFCs
    • Log the RFC in the change management log
    • Link the RFC to a problem number when the RFC comes from problem management
    ITIL ® Change Management Receipt of Request for Change Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Meet as a Change Advisory Board or ITEC on a periodic basis to assess and approve change requests
    • Review and categorize the change requests
    • Schedule the change requests
    • Identify the resources required such as personnel, infrastructure, and budget
    ITIL ® Change Management Change Analysis and Review Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Notify concerned parties of
      • the approved change,
      • the schedule for changes, and
      • their involvement in the change
    • Release work orders to the correct party to begin the build process
    ITIL ® Change Management Change Notification and Release Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Plan, develop, and procure the change components
    • Have changes tested by an independent second party
    • Stage a pilot when applicable
    • Monitor the change for a period of time after implementation
    • Provide regular updates and notify the change manager of any problems that arise
    • Back out failed changes and determine another course of action
    ITIL ® Change Management Building, Testing, and Implementation Monitoring Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Keep stakeholders informed during the monitoring phase of the change
    • Notify those who will be affected by the change review process
    • Review the reason for a change’s success
    • Provide details on the reasons for failure of the implementation, the next course of action, and the impact to the stakeholders
    ITIL ® Change Management Change Outcome Notification Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Collect information after the implementation of a change
    • Prepare and distribute a complete evaluation report
    • Assess each phase of the process/project
    • Prepare a lessons-learned report
    • Close the request for change
    ITIL ® Change Management Post-Implementation Evaluation Source: Dave Pultorak Adapted by Ray Hoving
    • Coordination of multiple changes into a release to minimize change effort and service disruption
    Release Management Why Release Management?
    • For large or critical hardware rollouts
    • For major software rollouts
    • To bundle or batch related sets of Changes
    Release Management Responsibilities:
    • Planning and overseeing the successful rollout of new and changed software and associated hardware and documentation
    • Liaison with Change Management to agree the exact content and rollout plan for the Release
    • Ensuring that all items being rolled out or changed are secure and traceable via the CMDB
    • Managing Customers and Users expectations of Releases and rollouts
    Source: ITSMF, Adapted by Ray Hoving
  • ITIL Version 2 – Service Process View Incident Management Configuration Management Problem Management Change Management Release Management Source: ITSMF – The IT Service Management Forum Limited Modules added for Service Desk and Security Functions Service Level Management Availability Management Capacity Management Financial Management Continuity Management
  • The Case for Process Maturity
    • Significant research has shown us that project success greatly increases with the maturity of the organization’s development processes.
    • Evidence is mounting that Infrastructure Service process maturity also yields high returns.
    • Performance breakdowns occur during the transition from applications development to infrastructure operation
    • A synergistic blend of best practices and work flow for systems development and infrastructure operation will ensure the smooth transition from systems to solutions to services, yielding maximum return on the IT investment
    © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
  • Capability Maturity Model Level 5 4 3 2 1 Source: CMU SEI
  • Mapping ITIL to Process Maturity Source: Software Engineering Resource Centre - Netherlands
  • Mapping ITIL to Process Maturity – Another Example © Pultorak and Associates Ltd.
    • Continuous process improvement is enabled by quantitative feedback from the process and from piloting innovative ideas and technologies
    Level 5: Optimizing
    • Detailed measures of the operations process and product quality are collected
    • Both the process and products are quantitatively understood and controlled
    • High quality work products are consistently delivered
    Level 4: Managed
    • Operations process is documented, standardized and integrated across the organization
    • All organizational units use an approved, tailored version of the standard process for supporting and delivering services
    • Consistent work products produced
    • Base practices defined and performed consistently
    Level 3: Defined
    • Management process established to track performance
    • Process discipline in place to repeat earlier successes within organizational units
    • Many work products and base practices in place
    Level 2: Repeatable
    • Ad hoc or loosely defined process
    • Success depends upon individual effort and heroics
    • A few work products and base practices emerging
    Level 1: Initial
    • Activity is not accounted for or rarely performed
    Level 0: Not Present
  • Infrastructure Service Assessment - Example
      • = Current Assessment
      • = Desired Future State
    • Maturity Level Descriptions:
      • 0 = Not Present
      • 1 = Initial
      • 2 = Repeatable
      • 3 = Defined
      • 4 = Managed
      • 5 = Optimized
    ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Source: Ray Hoving Client Engagement Capacity Management Availability Management Service Level Management Release Management Change Management Configuration Management Problem Management Incident Management Maturity Rating 0 1 2 3 4 5 ITIL Activity Area
  • Incident Management – Low Process Maturity Example © Ray Hoving Associates LLC User/Customers Business App Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure Analysts Support Help Support Field Center Desk Groups Analysts Log Log DB Server Network Operations Monitoring Log Log L L L Support Level 1 Support Level 2 Support Level 3 Support Functions
  • Incident Management – High Process Maturity Example © Ray Hoving Associates LLC User/Customers Business Application Service Infrastructure Infrastructure Analysts Support Center Support Field Centers Groups Analysts Operations Monitoring Log Log DB Server Network Log Support Level 1 Support Level 2 Support Level 3 Support Functions SPOC App 1 App 2 App 3
  • Process Maturity Outcomes Applications Delivery : Infrastructure Services :
    • Improved project performance (on time, on budget, on-the-mark).
    • Ability to adapt and handle changing conditions.
    • Decreased application delivery cycle times.
    • Increased development and maintenance staff productivity, capability, and morale.
    • Increased service quality.
    • Decreased operating costs.
    • Increased operations staff productivity, capability, and morale.
    © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
  • Implementation Challenges Process Design: What You Don't See is Critical Values & Beliefs Information Architecture & Systems Organizational Structures Change Readiness Leadership Retraining Reward & Measurement Systems New ITSM Processes Job Definitions Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • ITIL Version 3 - Service Life-Cycle View Source: ITIL Refresh Project Service Design Service ITIL Service Strategies Service Operation Service Design Continual Service Improvement Service Transition Complimentary Guidance Quick Wins Governance Methods Case Studies Value-added Products Templates Qualifications Study Aids Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • ITIL Version 3 – Service Life-Cycle Model Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • Service Life-Cycle Description
    • Service Strategy –
      • Looks at overall business aims and expectations
      • Ensures IT strategy maps back to them
    • Service Design –
      • Starts with a set of new or changed business requirements
      • Ends with the development of a service designed to meet the documented needs of the business
    • Service Transition –
      • Manage change, risk & quality assurance
      • Implement service designs so that service operations can manage the services and infrastructure in a controlled manner
    • Service Operation –
      • Business as usual activities
      • Robust end-to-end operations practices
    • Continual Service Improvement –
      • Overall view of all other elements
      • Looks for ways that the service provision can be improved
    Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • From V2 Process View to V3 Life-Cycle View
    • The most widely read books in Version 2 of ITIL - Service Support and Service Delivery - consists of the 10 processes shown above. The ITIL Service Lifecycle in Version 3 relies on these basic processes to execute the lifecycle stages.
    • New processes have been added as well, but these tried and tested processes form a major part of the ITIL Service Management Practices.
    Service Support Service Delivery
      • New Processes:
        • Strategy Generation
        • Service Design Aspects
        • Supplier Management
        • Outsourcing Models
        • Service Knowledge Management System
        • Application Design and Management
        • Technology Architecture Design & Management
        • Service Measurement
        • Event Management
        • Request Fulfillment
    Source: ITIL Toolkit Service Design IT Service Continuity Management Service Strategy Financial Management Service Design Capacity Management Service Design Availability Management Continual Service Improvement Service Level Management Service Transition Release Management Service Transition Change Management Service Transition Configuration Management Service Operation Problem Management Service Operation Incident Management ITIL V3 Life-Cycle Stages ITIL V2 Processes
  • ITIL - Deployment Life-Cycle Related Processes Incident Management Configuration Management Problem Management Change Management Release Management © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
  • Benefits of Adopting ITIL
    • The world’s most widely recognized and adopted framework for IT Service Mgt. It has grown from a cottage industry in the 80’s to a global influence.
    • Over this time the many benefits of ITIL have become widely known and continue to grow as the community of practice matures.
    • ITIL is widely practiced among industry service providers and offers a common practice base for improved service chain management.
    • Service Management Practices offer benefits that demonstrate their value and return on investment. Some of the widely published benefits are:
      • Non-proprietary practice - Does not require a license to practice; independent of any commercial platform
      • Scalable - Can be adapted for any size of organization
      • Reduce Costs - Proven its value in reducing overall cost of managing services
      • Improved Quality - Improves the quality of IT services through sound management practices
      • Aligned to Standards - Well aligned to the ISO/IEC Standards for Service Mgt
      • Qualification - Supports the ITSM professional with a line of accredited training and education courses
      • ROI – Helps IT organizations demonstrate their return on investment and measurable value to the business
    Source: ITIL Toolkit
    • Making it part of everyone’s daily work practice
    • Blending a spirit of innovation with a consistent approach
    • Overcoming apathy, disuse, and misuse
    • Building performance measurement into the process
    • Overcoming resistance to change
    • Focusing the energies of the project teams
    • Having the discipline to make process framework a habit
    • Overcoming NIH (Not Invented Here)
    • Sustaining the commitment.
    Implementation Considerations - Challenge of Change “ The soft stuff is the hard stuff.” © Ray Hoving Associates LLC
  • ITIL Implementation Process Source: ITIL Toolkit
    • Honestly assess your current level of maturity
    • Identify the gaps to fill for getting to the next level
    • Involve the stakeholders in the process design
    • Pilot for learning and adjustment
    • Implement for maximum return
    • Follow the IDEAL Model
    • Repeat for the next level
    © Ray Hoving Associates LLC Moving up the Levels
  • IDEAL Process Improvement Model
    • I – Initiating Laying the groundwork for a successful improvement effort.
    • D – Diagnosing Determining where you are relative to where you want to be
    • E – Establishing Planning the specifics of how you will reach your destination
    • A – Acting Doing the work according to the plan
    • L – Learning Learning from the experience and improving your ability to adopt new processes in the future.
    IDEAL Life Cycle Model for Process Improvement Source: Carnegie Mellon University IDEAL provides a usable, understandable approach to continuous improvement by outlining the steps necessary to establish a successful process improvement program: Source: Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
  • Implementation Advice
    • DO’s:
      • Perform a feasibility study first
      • Use what is already good in the organization
      • Take it slowly and concentrate on small steps and quick wins
      • Appoint a strong project manager with end-to-end focus to drive this implementation program
      • Keep in mind that you are dealing with personal issues
      • Keep communicating WHY your organization needs this
      • Measure your successes continuous
      • Enjoy the milestones and share them with the IT group
    • DON’T:
      • Try to mature all the processes at the same time
      • Start with a tool
      • Start without management commitment and/or budget
      • ‘ ITILISE’ your organization – it’s a philosophy, not an executable application
      • Rush; take your time to do it well
      • Go on without a reason
      • Ignore the positive activities already in place
    Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • Tool Examples
    • Service Desk Tools / Support Tools
      • Heat
      • Infra
      • Peregrine Service Centre
      • Remedy
    • System Management tools
      • HP Openview
      • Qualiparc
      • CA Unicentre
    Source: ITIL Toolkit
  • References
    • ITIL – Information Technology Infrastructure Library: www.itil.co.uk
    • OGC - Office of Government Commerce: www.ogc.gov.uk
    • EXIN - Examination Institute for Info Science: www.exin-exams.com
    • ISEB - British Computer Society: www.bcs.org.uk
    • ITIL and ITSM World: www.itil-itsm-world.com
    • COBIT - IT Governance Institute: www.itgi.org
    • IT Service Management Forum USA: www.itsmfusa.org
    • Ray Hoving Associates LLC: www.rayhoving.com