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    Original PPT Original PPT Presentation Transcript

    • How to Leverage Metrics to Support ITIL Processes August 2, 2006 2:00pm EDT, 11:00am PDT Speaker: George Spafford, Principal Consultant, Pepperweed Consulting
    • Housekeeping
      • Submitting questions to speaker
        • Submit question at any time by using “Ask a question” section located on lower left-hand side of your console.
        • Questions about presentation content will be answered during 10 minute Q&A session at end of webcast.
      • Technical difficulties?
        • Click on “Help” link
        • Use “Ask a question” interface
    • Main Presentation
    • Agenda
      • Overall metric selection considerations
      • That metric selections must have value
      • Metrics and Behavior
      • Potential metrics for each process
      This Powerpoint file will be shared and can be obtained by emailing either Jupitermedia ( [email_address] ) or myself ( [email_address] ).
    • So, what is your goal?
    • IT Enables the Attainment of Objectives and Goals Note, functional areas have objectives that they must achieve in order to support the organization attain its goals
    • What are your constraints?
    • Management of an IT Organization Requires Teamwork, Planning & Oversight To achieve the goal requires a proper framework of metrics that recognizes that IT, customers and management may have different reporting requirements that must be recognized and met.
    • A Process
      • Is a series of tasks with a goal
        • “ Why are we doing this?”
      • If there isn’t a goal, then you do not have a process
        • You can say the same for a company
      • Metrics are used to measure the health of the process
        • Movement towards the goal
        • Productivity is just that – movement towards a goal
      • Metrics can also be used to measure the overall health of IT … to an extent
    • Metrics & Deming
      • Dr. Deming is misquoted as saying “If you can’t measure it you can’t manage it”
      • He did believe in collecting and using data as part of decision making
      • He also cautioned as one of his Seven Deadly Sins to avoid basing decisions solely on “visible numbers”
      • Deming felt that not everything was visible or “knowable” and thus not measurable
    • Metrics Must Have Value
      • They must clearly support attainment of the goal
      • Do not generate metrics just because you can
      • Do not spend more collecting and creating the metrics than what they are worth
        • Don’t spend $20 to report on something that amounts to only $1
      • They must be desired by management – beware of the 10-100 page management report!!!
        • Understand what they need
        • Keep it concise! 1-2 pages – not 5, 10, 20, etc.
        • Use a communication medium and format that works for them
      • Select metrics that capture impacts to the organization – not just IT
        • What is the value of the 99.99% availability metric by itself if the business lost $1 million during that 0.01% of downtime?
    • Metrics & Causality
      • Each metric only tells part of the story
      • Increasing the metrics judiciously may explain more (then again they may not)
      • A metric can often change for reasons other than what you suspect
      • Consider if it is possible to use several metrics and perhaps some qualitative/subjective factors that can validate observations if something is important enough
      • Use absolute measures and ratios
        • 100% of 1 is very different than 100% of 10,000
      • Invest your time and resources where they matter!
    • “ Tell me how you will measure me and I will tell you how I will behave.” -- Dr. Eliyahu Goldratt
    • What behavior do you need? During each stage of the process adoption lifecycle you may need to emphasize certain behaviors over others and that will affect the metrics you select .
    • Always ask “What negative behavior may this metric create?” You may want to measure a metric thinking it will drive positive behavior only to find the reverse!!!
    • ITIL is a Systemic Approach
      • The power of ITIL lies in its systemic integration of processes areas – not simply piecemeal adoption
      • Any single process in isolation will reach a level of diminishing returns
      • As Goldratt has taught us, to optimize the throughput of a system requires optimization of the system – not just one area
      • The metrics selected for use must reflect a systemic approach
      Service Support, Service Delivery and Security
    • The following metrics are for consideration and judicious selection…
    • Change Management
      • Number of changes submitted
      • Number of changes in process (meaning the backlog)
      • Number of changes rejected
      • Number of changes implemented
      • Number of emergency changes
      • Number of unauthorized changes
      • Number of changes that exceeded the allowed change window time
      • Number of failed changes that did not have a backout plan
      • Lost units of the goal associated with failed changes (“We lost $100,000 in sales due to the outage associated with that failed change.”)
      • Number of changes implemented on schedule
      • Number of SLAs breached due to a failed change
      • Number of changes that failed during installation
      • Number of changes that caused an incident
      • Number of changes that caused a problem
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Configuration Management
      • Number of inaccurate Configuration Items (CIs)
        • Where the production CI doesn’t match the CI record
      • Number of failed changes due to inaccurate CIs
      • Number of incidents caused by inaccurate CIs
      • Amount of unplanned work caused by inaccurate CIs
      • Number of unused licenses (could be + or -)
        • We worry about this because license management is one of the frequent large ROI components for doing Configuration Mgt
      • Number of unauthorized CIs (entered without a RFC)
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Release Management
      • Number of releases that conformed to the organization’s Release Policy
      • Number of releases implemented according to schedule
      • Number of releases implemented late
      • Number of unauthorized CIs in the Definitive Software Library (DSL)
      • Number of releases that were not tested according to plan
      • Number of emergency releases
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • The Service Desk
      • Number of calls to the SD
        • Calls = Phone, FAX, email and WWW
      • Number of calls handed by agent
      • Number of service requests
      • Number of incidents
      • Number of calls handled within SLA targets
      • Number of calls handled that exceeded SLA targets
      • Number of tickets addressed during the first contact
      • Number of tickets escalated due to timing
      • Number of tickets escalated due to skills required
      • Average time the caller waits in queue
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Incident Management
      • Number of incidents
      • Number of incidents resolved within SLA targets for each level of priority
      • Number of incidents escalated to each level of support
      • Average time to resolve incidents by priority
      • Number of incidents incorrectly recorded (Priority, Category, Etc.)
      • Number of incidents incorrectly assigned to the wrong resources
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Problem Management
      • Number of problems
      • Number of known errors
      • Number of known errors resolved
      • Number of RFCs raised by Problem Management
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Service Level Management
      • Number of services covered by SLAs
      • Number of SLAs that do not have required Operating Level Agreements and/or Underpinning Contracts
      • Number of SLA breaches
      • Number of SLA targets at risk
      • Business impact of breaches
      • Number of Service Complaints
        • From Customers
        • From Users
      • Number of Service Reviews conducted
      • Number of Service Reviews past due
      • Number of Service Improvement Plans (SIPs) Opened
      • Number of open tasks from SIPs
      • Number of SIPs closed
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Availability Management
      • Service availability expressed using an agreed upon measure
        • Too basic : Availability = Uptime / Time Possible
        • What metric or combination would be meaningful to the organization?
      • Mean time to detect
      • Mean time to repair (MTTR)
      • Mean Time Between Service Incidents (MTBSI)
      • Business Impact of outages
      • Number of services where availability targets were met
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Capacity Management
      • Number of services with unknown capacity requirements
      • Unplanned capacity purchases
      • Accuracy of capacity plan
        • Capacity Purchases vs Budgeted Amounts
      • Number of CIs with performance monitoring
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • IT Service Continuity Management
      • Number of services with a continuity plan
      • Number of services without a continuity plan
      • Number of continuity plans tested
      • Number of continuity plans not tested according to schedule (the backlog)
      • Number of open issues raised by testing
      • Number of plans deemed “at risk”
      • Number of plans deemed “ineffective”
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • IT Financial Management
      • Actual expenses relative to budget
        • This can be broken down many ways
        • Number of services with a known costs
        • Number of services reviewed per schedule
      • Charge back
        • Amount of IT costs absorbed
        • Profitability (if applicable)
        • Number of Services with a model in testing
        • Number of Services with a model implemented
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Security Management
      • Number of security incidents opened by severity
      • Number of security incidents closed by security
      • Number of services that have had security reviews
      • Number of security reviews pending
      • Number of risks identified
      • Number of risks mitigated to an acceptable level
      • Customer Satisfaction
      • “ Number” could be an actual count or a ratio. If it’s a ratio, get agreement on what is used to compute the ratio
    • Food For Thought
      • Understand objectives and goals
      • Understand what stakeholders need
      • Keep reports focused on what the reader needs
      • Periodically review the metrics to see if changes are needed
      • Only select and use metrics that matter
    • Additional Resources
      • There are metrics to be found in each process chapter of the OGC ITIL books
      • The “Planning to Implement Service Management” volume is especially rich with metrics for consideration
      • The itSMF’s new “Metrics for IT Service Management” is an excellent resource
      • The last two items provide a tremendous wealth of metrics for consideration
    • Thank you! George Spafford [email_address] http://www.pepperweed.com Daily News Subscription Information and Archive (it’s a free newsletter covering technology business, regulatory compliance, security and process improvement) http://www.spaffordconsulting.com/dailynews.html
    • Questions?
    • Thank you for attending If you have any further questions, e-mail webcasts@jupitermedia.com