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ITIL Foundations

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    ITIL Foundations ITIL Foundations Document Transcript

    • ITIL Foundations May 14, 2007 © 2004 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Introduction July 13, 2006 © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.HP Self-Maintainer (U.S. Only) 2 1
    • IT is the business………. “IT is the business” and “The business is IT” © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 3 What is IT Service Management (ITSM)? • The management of IT services to support one or more business areas. • ITSM is based on the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) A standard set of published materials used worldwide • The IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) defines “best practice” processes. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 4 2
    • Key objectives of Service Management • Align IT services with the current and future needs of the business and its customers • Improve the quality of IT services delivered • Reduce the long-term costs of provisioning services © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 5 What is a Service? • Definition: “Work done for others as an occupation or business” (American Heritage Dictionary) • Historical Example: Roman Aqueducts © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 6 3
    • Roman Aqueducts © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 7 What is an IT Service? • A set of related functions provided by IT systems in support of one or more business areas • This service can be made up of hardware, software and communication components, but is perceived as a self-contained, coherent entity © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 8 4
    • What is a Service Culture? • Recognition that the IT exists to further the business aims of the customers of its services. • A willingness to go that ‘extra step’ to satisfy customer needs. • An understanding of the customers’ perspective • Achieving a Service Culture depends on: – Senior Management support – A good understanding of why IT Services are being provided – An understanding of the impact on the business of poor service – Clear targets to aim for, and from which to progress © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 9 The Four P’s IT Service Management (ITSM) is all about the efficient, effective and economical use of: • People – Customers, Users & IT Staff • Processes – ITIL Service Support – “Operational” Service Delivery – “Tactical” • Products – Tools and Technology • Partners – Vendors and Suppliers © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 10 5
    • Continuous Improvement - ITSM The adoption of ITSM disciplines and processes will facilitate a continuous improvement in the quality of IT services. It is aimed at achieving and maintaining best value while remaining in line with changing business requirements. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 11 Continuous Improvement – ITSM A process-led approach Where do we Vision and want to be? Business objectives Where are we Assessments now? How do we get Process Change where we want? How do we know Metrics we have arrived? © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 12 6
    • Quality Improvement • The customer is the most important part of the production line. • It is not enough to have satisfied customers, the profit comes from returning customers and those who praise your product or service to friends and acquaintances. • The key to quality is to reduce variance. • Managers should learn to take responsibility and Dr. Edwin Deming provide leadership. 1900-1993 • Improve constantly. • Institute a vigorous program of education and self-improvement. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 13 Quality Improvement – Deming Cycle Plan – What needs to be done Do – Planned activities are implemented Check – Did the activities provided the expected result Act – Adjust plans based on information gathered while checking Quality management is the responsibility of everyone working in the organization providing the service. Every employee has to be aware of how their contribution to the organization affects the quality of the work provided by their colleagues, and eventually the services provided by the organization as a whole. Quality management also means continuously looking for opportunities to improve the organization and implementing quality improvement activities. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 14 7
    • ITIL Best Practice — A Working Definition Best Practice is a set of guidelines based on the best experiences of the most qualified and experienced professionals in a particular field. Best Practice is based on: • More than one person • More than one organization • More than one technology • More than one event © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 15 IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) T T h Planning to Implement Service Management h e e The Service Management ICT T B Service e Business Infrastructure u Support c Management s Perspective Service h I Delivery n o n Security l e Management o s Applications g s Management y © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 16 8
    • Core ITSM Components Service Delivery Service Level Management Capacity Management Availability Management Service Management Service Continuity Management Financial Management Service Support Incident Management Problem Management Service Desk Release Management Configuration Management Change Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 17 Service Management Service Financial Continuity Service Level Problem Configuration Capacity Change Incident Availability Release Service Desk © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 18 9
    • ITIL Foundations – Service Support © 2004 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Service Desk © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 10
    • Mission of Service Desk • To act as the SPOC between the User and IT Service Provider. • To handle Incidents and Requests, and provide an interface for other activities such as Change, Problem, Configuration, Release, Service Level and IT Service Continuity Management. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 21 Objectives of Service Desk • To be the single point of contact for all IT customers/users • To restore service whenever possible • To maximize service availability • To manage all incidents to a closure © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 22 11
    • Service Desk Diagram Request Mgmt Service Desk Incident Report Processes Customer Liaison Change Mgmt Escalation Management Local Service Desk Central Structures Virtual Tracking Service Desk Serv Desk System & Commun. System Technologies Self-Service Communication Staffing Levels Staff Managing Turnover Management Workload Mgmt Soft Skills Education & Mgmt Skills Training Serv Desk Ops Customer Service © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 23 Service Desk Implementation • Target effectiveness metrics (KPIs) e.g.: – % first time fix – Number of incidents correctly categorized at initial logging – Number of hardware faults reported • Selecting the correct structure: – Local Service Desk – Central Service Desk – Virtual Service Desk • Follow the sun Data Center Where does the Service Desk go? Business Users © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 24 12
    • Local Service Desks • Designed to support local business needs • Support is usually in the same location as the business it is supporting • Practical for smaller organizations Local Service Desk Business Users Data Center Local Service Desk Business Users © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 25 Central Service Desk • Designed to support multiple locations • The desk is in a central location whilst the business is distributed • Ideal for larger organization as: – Reduces operational costs – Consolidates management overview – Improves resources usage • Could provide secondary support to local desks Business Users Central Data Center Service Desk Business Users © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 26 13
    • Virtual Service Desk • Location of SD analysts is invisible to the customers • May include some element of ‘home working’ • Common processes and procedures should exist – single incident log • Common agreed language for data entry Business Users Data Center Virtual Service Desk Business Users © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 27 ‘Follow the Sun’ Option • Not a type of Service Desk but an option usually applied to two or more Central Service Desks for global operations • Where Service Desk support switches between two or more desks to provide 24 hr global cover. • Telephony switching needed • Multilingual staff usually required • Local conditions and cultural issues need to be considered • Clear escalation channels needed Supports the Virtual Service Desk. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 28 14
    • Incident Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Mission of Incident Management To restore normal service operation as quickly as possible with minimum disruption to the business… © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 30 15
    • Incident Management Incident Management is a reactive task, i.e. reducing or eliminating the effects of actual or potential disturbances in IT services, thus ensuring that users can get back to work as soon as possible. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 31 Objectives of Incident Management • To ensure the best use of resources to support the business • To maintain meaningful records • To deal with incidents consistently Activities performed by Serv Desk Activities performed by IT Incident Detection & Recording Initial Support Classification Known Tracking & Error Communication Investigation & Diagnosis Database Resolution & Recovery Incident Closure © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 32 16
    • The scope of Incident Management? The scope of incident management is very wide, and can include anything affecting customer service, for example: • Hardware failure • Software error • Network faults • Information request • How do I…? • Request for equipment moves • Password re-set, changes • New starters • Request for consumables • Service extension requests • Performance issues © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 33 Incident Determination (1 of 3) EVENTS LOG “is it an Incident?” Service Request Procedure Incident Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 34 17
    • Definition — an Incident “An incident is any event that is not part of the standard operation of a service and that causes, or may cause, an interruption to, or a reduction in, the quality of that service” © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 35 Incident Determination (2 of 3) “I want to move “How do I get this to my PC” Print” LOG “is it an Incident?” Service Request Procedure Incident Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 36 18
    • What is a Service Request? A request from a user for support, delivery, information, advice or documentation, not being a failure in the IT infrastructure. If a Service is requested that is not for a defined ‘standard service’, and it alters the state of the infrastructure, then it triggers a Request For Change (RFC). An RFC is not handled by Incident Management but is dealt with formally by Change Management. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 37 Incident Determination (3 of 3) “My PC won’t “I can’t send this work” e-mail LOG “is it an Incident?” Service Request Procedure Incident Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 38 19
    • Definition — a Problem “A problem is the unknown underlying cause of one or more incidents” Problems are the responsibility of Problem Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 39 Definition — a Known Error “A known error is an incident or problem for which the root cause is known and for which a temporary workaround or permanent alternative has been identified. It remains a known error unless it is permanently fixed by a change.” Known Errors are the responsibility of Problem Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 40 20
    • Relationships among Incidents, Problems, Known Errors and Changes Incidents keep happening…Incidents never evolve into a problem. Incident Management Faulty CI identified Problem > Root cause determined Known Error Work-around developed Problem Management RFC produced Change Change effected Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 41 Impact + Urgency = Priority Impact • Affect on the business • Defined in the SLA Urgency • Speed needed to resolve incident • Extent it can bear delay Priority • Sequence of dealing with events • Determined by impact, urgency and effort • Not assigned by the user • Decided outside the Service Desk © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 42 21
    • Service Desk / First Line Responsibilities • Incident registration • Initial support and classification • Resolution and recovery of incidents if possible • Escalation of incidents to support groups if necessary • Ownership, monitoring, tracking and communication • Review and closure of incidents Incident Detection & Recording Investigation & Diagnosis Initial Support Resolution & Recovery Classification Incident Closure © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 43 Second Line Support Staff Responsibilities • Handling escalated incidents and service requests • Incident investigation and diagnosis • The resolution and recovery of assigned Incidents. • Further escalation if needed • Detection of possible Problems and the assignment of them to the Problem Management team Incident Detection & Recording Investigation & Diagnosis Initial Support Resolution & Recovery Classification Incident Closure © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 44 22
    • Escalation If an incident cannot be resolved by first-line support within the agreed time, then more expertise or authority will have to be involved. • Functional Escalation (horizontal) - Functional escalation means involving personnel with more specialist skills, time or access privileges (technical authority) to solve the incident. • Hierarchical Escalation (horizontal) - hierarchical escalation means involving a higher level of organizational authority, when it appears that the current level of authority is insufficient to ensure that the incident will be resolved in time and/or satisfactorily. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 45 Critical Success Factors Successful Incident Management requires: • An up-to-date CMDB to help estimate the impact and urgency of incidents. • A knowledge base, for example an up-to-date problem/known error database to assist with recognizing incidents, and what solutions and workarounds are available. • An adequate automated system for recording, tracking and monitoring incidents. • Close ties with Service Level Management to ensure appropriate priorities and resolution times. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 46 23
    • Core ITSM Components Service Delivery Service Level Management Capacity Management Availability Management Service Management Service Continuity Management Financial Management Service Support Incident Management Problem Management Service Desk Release Management Configuration Management Change Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 47 Problem Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 24
    • Mission of Problem Management To minimize the adverse effect on the business of Incidents and Problems caused by errors in the infrastructure, and to proactively prevent the occurrence of Incidents, Problems, and Errors - Problem ID and Record Problem Control - Problem Classification - Investigate & Diagnosis - Error ID and Record - Error Assessment Error Control - Error Resolution Record Known - Error Resolution Monitoring Error - Error Closure Database - Trend Analysis Proactive Problem Mgmt - Targeting Preventative Actions - Major Problem Reviews Management Info © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 49 Scope of Problem Management • IT problems that affect IT services • Recurring Incidents/Problems • Pro-active Problem Management • Major incidents, if required • Maintaining relationships with third party suppliers © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 50 25
    • Objectives of Problem Management • To ensure that problems are identified and resolved • To prevent problem & incident occurrence and recurrence • To reduce the overall number of IT incidents • To minimize the impact of problems and incidents • To ensure that the right level and number of resources are resolving specific problems • To ensure that vendors comply with their contracts Problem Control Error Control Proactive Problem Mgmt Management Reporting © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 51 Problem Management Responsibilities Problem Management must ensure: • Data is properly recorded • Data is regularly inspected and maintained • Known Errors are recorded in a suitable Database • Support staff are educated to capture and record high-quality data © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 52 26
    • Incident Mgmt vs Problem Mgmt Incident Management • Restores agreed levels of services • Aims to resolve an incident quickly, by whatever means possible, including a workaround Problem Management • Diagnoses the root cause of incidents • Identifies a permanent solution • May take longer than Incident Management • Problem Management assists Incident Management by providing info about problems, known errors, workarounds and temporary fixes. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 53 Configuration Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 27
    • Objectives of Configuration Management • Identify and record infrastructure information • Control information in the CMDB • Leads to improved service quality (indirectly) • Supports license management • Ensure infrastructure information is up to date • A basis for Service Management processes • Information about the status of the infrastructure • Management information © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 55 Configuration Management – Key Definitions • Configuration • Relationships – Anything that needs to be – Primary controlled • Parent/child (part of) • Configuration Item (CI) – Secondary – A component within a • Connected to configuration • User of – A configuration in its own right • Lifecycle • CI Type – Stages in the life of a CI – e.g. software products, business systems, system software, etc. • Attribute – Describes a CI © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 56 28
    • Configuration Management Database (CMDB) Stores details of : Capacity SLAs People • CIs IT Service • Attribute Continuity Locations • Relationships • Events Availability Assets CMDB Licences Releases Finance Documents Changes Incidents The ‘core’ of an integrated service management tool = “information bank” for all other ITIL processes © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 57 Naming Conventions/Critical Factors • Unique • Clearly visible • Consistent with the organization • Copy and version numbers • Plan for growth • The critical factor for successful Configuration Management is that information in the database is up-to-date. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 58 29
    • Change Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Mission of Change Management To ensure that standardized methods and procedures are used for efficient and prompt handling of all changes , in order to minimize the impact of any related Incidents upon service. “Not every change is an improvement, but every improvement is a change.” © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 60 30
    • Scope of Change Management Covers areas including: • Hardware • Environment and facilities • Software – Live – Under development • Documentation and procedures • Organization and people © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 61 Objectives of Change Management • Manage the process of: – Requesting changes – Assessing changes – Authorizing changes – Implementing changes • Prevent unauthorized changes • Minimize disruption • Ensure proper research and relevant input • Coordinate build, test and implementation © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 62 31
    • Core Elements • Request for Change (RFC) • Change Advisory Board (CAB) • CAB Emergency Committee (CAB/EC) • Forward Schedule of Changes (FSC) • Projected Service Availability (PSA) • Change Model • Standard Change © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 63 Configuration & Change Management What are the relationships between services and the Infrastructure Create a CMDB • Relationships between components • Names of services linked to servers • Question Numbers for each component (link the Known Error Database) Change Scheduling (need a change manager) • Forward Schedule of Changes (FSC) • Projected Service Availability (PSA) • During Pit Stops © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 64 32
    • Release Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Release Management Release Management aims to ensure the quality of the production environment by using formal procedures. Release Management is concerned with implementation, unlike Change Management, which is concerned with the complete change process and focuses on risk. Release Management works closely with Configuration Management and Change Management to ensure that the common CMDB is updated with every release. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 66 33
    • Release Management Activities (1 of 2) • Release Planning – Developing a plan for each release – Agree and schedule with Change Manager • Develop or Procure • Designing, Building and Configuring Releases – Process for assembling CIs for release – CIs are under Configuration Management control • Testing and Release Acceptance – Installation procedures – System functionality © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 67 Release Management Activities (2 of 2) • Rollout Planning – Builds onto the release plan – Exact implementation actions • Communication, Preparation, and Training – When and how releases will be rolled out – How they will be affected – Progress of changes • Distribution and installation – Moving the release to the target environment – Deploying the release © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 68 34
    • Elements The CMDB should be updated and referred to throughout the Release Mgmt process. CMDB DSL DHS Build Distribute Test Implement © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 69 Service Support Processes - Review Service Desk Incident Management C Problem M Management D Change Configuration B Management Management Release Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 70 35
    • End of Part I © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 71 ITIL Foundations – Service Delivery © 2004 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 36
    • Service Delivery Processes Availability Management Service Level Capacity Financial Management Management Management Service Continuity Management © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 73 Service Level Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 37
    • Scope of Service Level Management Three sets of relationships • Customer and IT • Internal departments within IT • IT and external suppliers Customer Service Level Agreement Service A Service B Service C IT Infrastructure Operational Level Agreements Underpinning Contracts Internal Organisations External Organisations © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 75 Objectives of Service Level Management • To catalog IT services • To quantify IT services • To define internal and external service targets • To achieve agreed service targets • Ongoing improvement of service levels (SIP) Catalog Services • To review agreements and contracts Draft Service Levels Negotiate & Agree Monitor, Report & Review Service Improvement Program © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 76 38
    • The Service Level Management Process Establish The Process • Planning • Implementation Implement SLAs Periodic Reviews • Catalogue Services • Review SLAs Iterative • SLRs • Review SLM Process Process • Review UCs & OLAs • Draft • Negotiate • Agree Manage the Ongoing Process • Monitor • Report • Review © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 77 Service Level Management Definitions • SLA (Service Level Agreement) – Is between the customer and IT – Written in business language (clear & unambiguous) • OLA (Operating Level Agreement) – Is between IT and its own internal IT departments – Written in technical language (clear & unambiguous) • Underpinning Contract – Is between IT and 3rd party suppliers – Written in legal language © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 78 39
    • What is in a SLA? • Service scope and description • Service hours • Measures of availability and reliability • Support details – who to contact, when, how • Respond and fix times • Deliverables and time scales • Change approval and implementation © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 79 What is in a SLA? • Reference to IT Service Continuity plan • Signatories • Responsibilities of both parties • Reporting • Review process • Glossary of terms Note: Availability should always be measured from … the customer’s perspective. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 80 40
    • Availability Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Objectives of Availability Management • Designing IT services for availability • Measuring and monitoring the key areas • Optimize the availability of the infrastructure • Reducing incident frequency and duration • Corrective action for downtime Design • The Availability Plan • Balancing Availability and Cost Monitor Corrective Action Optimize © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 82 41
    • Key Concepts • Availability (%) • Reliability (Time) • Maintainability • Serviceability • Security © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 83 Availability • Proportion of agreed service hours a customer can access a service • Measured from the customers’ perspective • Expressed as a percentage (AST – DT) x 100 Availability = AST © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 84 42
    • Reliability • The prevention of failure • The ability to keep services and components operable • Reliability is calculated using statistics © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 85 Maintainability, Serviceability, and Security • Maintainability – Preventative maintenance – Restoration and repair times, Mean Time To Repair (MTTR) • Serviceability – The support for which external suppliers can be contracted to provide parts of the IT infrastructure • Security – Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability to authorized personnel only © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 86 43
    • Expanded Incident Lifecycle MTTR - Mean Time To Repair or downtime Response Time Recovery time Detection Repair Restore Incident Diagnosis Recover Incident Detection MTBF – Mean Time Repair time Time Between Failures or Uptime MTBSI – Mean Time Between System Incidents © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 87 Service Agreements Users Availability SLA IT Services IT Systems Underpinning Contracts Reliability OLA Maintainability Serviceability Internal Suppliers External Suppliers and Maintainers and Maintainers © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 88 44
    • Capacity Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice Mission of Capacity Management To ensure best use of the appropriate IT Infrastructure to cost effectively meet business needs … and matching IT resources to deliver these services at the agreed levels currently and in the future Good capacity management eliminates panic buying at the last minute, or buying the biggest box possible and crossing your fingers. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 90 45
    • Objectives of Capacity Management • Optimal performance of the current infrastructure • Understanding how the infrastructure is being used and how it will be used • Assessing new technology • Building capacity for new services • Forecasting and planning infrastructure requirements for ongoing IT Service Delivery © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 91 Capacity Management Strategy Optimum Common Capacity Practice Level Actual Growth In Demand Incidents © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 92 46
    • Three areas of responsibility Business Capacity Management (BCM) • understand future business needs • plan and implement sufficient capacity to support services Service Capacity Management (SCM) • understand IT services, resource usage and variations • ensure that SLA targets can be met Resource Capacity Management (RCM) • understand the utilization of all component parts of the IT infrastructure • optimize use of the current hardware and software resources © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 93 Demand Management • Reactive and Proactive Capacity Management • Managing demand where capacity is limited • Resources allocated by business priority • Influence user behavior • Increased or reduced charges for specific resources or times Optimum utilization Prior to Demand Management After Demand Management Utilization 8:00 10:00 12:00 14:00 16:00 18:00 © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 94 47
    • IT Service Continuity Management © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice IT Service Continuity • A disaster is much more serious than an ‘Incident’. A disaster is a business interruption. • That means that all or part of the business is not ‘in business’ following a disaster. • The IT Service Continuity Management process emphasizes prevention, i.e. avoiding disasters. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 96 48
    • Objectives of IT Service Continuity Management • Reduce the vulnerability of the organization • Reduce identified risks • Plan for recovery of business processes • To involve 3rd parties to mitigate risk • Reduce the threat of potential disasters • To prevent loss of Investor confidence © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 97 Business and IT Responsibilities Business Continuity IT Continuity • Business Processes • IT Services • Facilities • Systems • Business Staff • Technical Staff • Strategy for Business • Strategy for IT Continuity Continuity © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 98 49
    • Possible Risks • Damage and denial of access • Loss of critical support services • Failure of critical suppliers • Human error • Technical error • Fraud, sabotage, extortion, espionage • Viruses or other security breaches • Industrial action • Natural disasters © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 99 Business Impact Analysis (BIA) Purpose: • Identify key IT services • Determine the effect of unavailability • Investigate the time before the effects are felt • Assess minimum recovery requirements • Document with the business Impact scenarios © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 100 50
    • Service Continuity Strategy • Which services will we plan for? • What recovery and preventative options are available? • What are the costs of each? • Which services take priority in recovery? © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 101 Standby Arrangement Options • Do nothing • Manual workarounds • Reciprocal arrangements • Fortress Approach • Insurance • Immediate recovery – hot standby (<24 hrs) • Intermediate recovery – warm standby (24-72 hrs) • Gradual recovery – cold standby (>72 hrs) © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 102 51
    • The IT Service Continuity Plan • A working document detailing all processes and procedures • Under stringent Change Management • Detailing individual and team responsibilities • Off-site storage essential © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 103 Financial Management for IT Services © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 52
    • Mission of Financial Management To provide cost effective stewardship of the IT assets and the financial resources used in providing IT services ITIL was developed to structure the management of the IT infrastructure to promote the efficient and economic use of IT resources. One of the objectives was to stimulate cost awareness of customers to promote the wise use of IT resources in the perspective of business goals. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 105 Scope of Financial Management • Budgeting (mandatory) – Forecasting, control and monitoring of expenditure • IT Accounting (mandatory) – Enables IT to account for where money is spent on running the department and providing services • Charging (optional) – Billing customers for services © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 106 53
    • Objectives of Financial Management • To account for running IT • To facilitate accurate budgeting • As a basis for business decisions • Balancing cost, capacity and SLRs • To recover costs where required (Charging) © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 107 Cost Elements Major type Cost Elements Hardware Servers, storage, workstations, laptops, PDAs, printers, networks Software Operating systems, applications software, utilities People Recruitment, employment costs, benefits, cars, relocation costs, expenses, training Accommodation Offices, power, lighting, water, storage, secure areas Transfer Internal charges from other cost centres within the organisation External Services Security services, IT Service Continuity services, outsourcing services © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 108 54
    • Cost Model Hardware Software People Accommodation External Service Transfer Cost elements Direct Costs Indirect Costs © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 109 Benefits of Charging • Improved cost consciousness • Better utilization of resources • Allows comparisons • Differential Charging – Demand management • Recover IT costs in an equitable manner, according to IT demands • Allowing users to influence usage/charges • Raise revenue © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 110 55
    • Problems of Charging • Cost of implementing and running charging system • Allocation of running costs to customers • Negative reaction to IT costs and charges due to increased visibility • Perception of poor value for money • Failure to differentiate between internal and external money • Failure to make equivalent comparisons © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 111 ITIL Certification Overview © 2004 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice 56
    • ITIL Certification & Training IT Service Management is made up of two areas: Service Support Service Delivery Change Management Service Level Mgmt Configuration Mgmt Financial Management Release Management Capacity Management Incident Management Availability Management Problem Management IT Service Continuity Management Service Desk © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 113 ITIL Certification & Training The ITIL Foundation Certification covers both Service Support and Service Delivery as an overview of ITIL. Service Support Service Delivery Change Management Service Level Mgmt Configuration Mgmt Financial Management Release Management Capacity Management Incident Management Availability Management Problem Management IT Service Continuity Management Service Desk Foundation Level Training © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 114 57
    • ITIL Certification & Training The ITIL Service Manager Certification covers both Service Support and Service Delivery at a very deep and comprehensive level. Service Support Service Delivery Change Management Service Level Mgmt Configuration Mgmt Financial Management Release Management Capacity Management Incident Management Availability Management Problem Management IT Service Continuity Management Service Desk Service Manager Training © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 115 ITIL Certification & Training The ITIL Practitioner Certification is a new certification level. The ITIL Service Manager training has been divided into four independent Practitioner certifications: Release and Control Agree and Define Change Management Service Level Mgmt Configuration Mgmt Financial Management Release Management Support and Restore Plan and Improve Incident Management Capacity Management Problem Management Availability Management Service Desk IT Service Continuity Mgmt Practitioner Training © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 116 58
    • ITIL Certification & Training The ITIL Certification Roadmap looks like this now: Service Manager Service Service Certification Support Delivery (2 Exams Required) Foundation Certification OR Release Agree Practitioner and and Control Define Certification (4 independent certifications – Support Plan 1 exam each) and and Restore Improve © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 117 ITIL Certification & Training Some individuals choose to pursue their certification like this: Release Agree and and Control Define Foundation Service Service Certification Support Delivery Support Plan and and Restore Improve Practitioner Service Certification Manager Certification Note: Practitioner Certification is not a prerequisite to the Service Manager Certification. Foundations Certification is the only prerequisite for either Practitioner or Service Manager Certification. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 118 59
    • ITIL/IT Service Management – Roadmap to Success © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 119 Approaching Improvement with ITIL “Greatness is largely a matter of conscious choice.” © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 120 60
    • Approaching Improvement with ITIL Before we begin walking the roadmap: • There must be a clear business justification for an ITSM implementation. • Making business processes more efficient and effective is a justification example. • All improvements must deliver benefits to the business, otherwise there is no business case. • ITSM can make a difference to your entire organization. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 121 ITSM Roadmap • Successful deployments of IT Service Management follow the following path: Learn Evaluate Align Integrate © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 122 61
    • Step 1: Learn • Senior management commitment – Resources – Budget • Establishing a vision • Training and communicating to employees about ITIL and the strategy for the organization • Creating a sense of urgency © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 123 Step 2: Evaluate “All good to great companies begin their path to greatness by confronting the brutal facts of their current reality.” Jim Collins – Good to Great • Evaluate what IT is doing today – IT Baseline • Defining what are the “services” IT provides today? – Processes – Best Practices – Functions – Linkages © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 124 62
    • Step 2: Evaluate • Identifying how large is the gap between the current role and the required role of IT: – Are the right processes and procedures in place to achieve our goals? – Do we have the right skill sets in place for success? – Do we have the right technology to support the business? – Do we need to change how we work and act within our culture? – How do we become more service oriented to the business? © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 125 Step 3: Align • Understanding the business, its stakeholders and its environment. • Having the business understand what IT is capable of. • Determine how IT impacts the business. © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 126 63
    • Step 4: Integrate • Enact process changes in areas that make sense. • Implement and change tools to support the processes…not the other way around. • Eliminate services that have no value to the business. • Recommend, prioritize and establish agreements with the business that are based on business importance, effort, cost and results. • Communicate, communicate, communicate © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 127 ITSM Lifecycle Customer Transformational Operational Needs Design Build Integrate Manage Evolve HP Effort/$’s Software / Tools Implementation & Transformation Operational ITSM Education Time © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 128 64
    • Thank you! © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 129 65