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IT Service Management Process Maps: Select Your Route to ITIL
 

IT Service Management Process Maps: Select Your Route to ITIL

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    IT Service Management Process Maps: Select Your Route to ITIL IT Service Management Process Maps: Select Your Route to ITIL Document Transcript

    • WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS IT Service Management Process Maps: Select ® Your Route to ITIL Best Practices JUNE 2008 Nancy Hinich CA S E RV I C E S Robert Sterbens CA SO LU T I O N S M A R K E T I N G
    • Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 SECTION 4: CONCLUSIONS 16 SECTION 1: CHALLENGE 2 SECTION 5: REFERENCES 16 Conflicting Directions Can Keep Service Excellence Out of Reach SECTION 6: ABOUT THE AUTHORS 17 The Need to Move from What ITIL Describes to How It Can Be Achieved ITIL Elevated to Business Imperative Attention to People, Process and Technology for a Healthy ITIL Ecosystem SECTION 2: OPPORTUNITY 3 ITIL is the Means; Service Excellence is the Destination SECTION 3: BENEFITS 15 High Standards and a Simplified Approach Lead to Innovation Copyright © 2008 CA. All rights reserved. All trademarks, trade names, service marks and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies. This document is for your informational purposes only. To the extent permitted by applicable law, CA provides this document “As Is” without warranty of any kind, including, without limitation, any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, or noninfringement. In no event will CA be liable for any loss or damage, direct or indirect, from the use of this document, including, without limitation, lost profits, business interruption, goodwill or lost data, even if CA is expressly advised of such damages. ITIL® is a Registered Trademark and a Registered Community Trademark of the Office of Government Commerce, and is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
    • Executive Summary Challenge Even as more organizations embrace IT Service excellence as essential to effectively compete, many stumble in their efforts to change current practice. While expert guidance from the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL®) adds significant value, obstacles arise in interpreting and applying ITIL best practices and justifying the significant effort to the business. People circumvent processes when they don’t understand their relevance or what is in it for them. Manual, repetitive procedures and workflows overburden IT resources and block pathways for change. To propel an organization’s journey to service excellence, business and IT must come together, accept and use ITIL processes as the vehicle, and find and follow the optimal path. Opportunity Universally, the first step on the ITIL journey to service excellence is to ensure that stakeholders understand “where we are now.” Then, these same people must understand “where we need to go” and “how we need to proceed.” The answers and the pathways to start will likely be unique to each organization. A successful journey is navigated from a high-level, strategic view with consideration for people, process and technology — the critical components of a flourishing ITIL ecosystem. An easy-to-understand visual framework for ITIL processes and relationships can ease complexity and derail unproductive detours that can disrupt service improvement initiatives. Benefits By planning the steps in the ITIL journey using well-defined process maps, engaging the right people and investing in the right technology, organizations are able to automate processes, reduce complexity and free staff to innovate. IT and the business become partners in this innovation, which leads to higher quality services that customers are demanding and that can set a business apart. CA process maps for ITIL version 3 (v3) expose the best routes and inter-dependencies across the five phases of the Service Lifecycle: Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation and Continual Service Improvement. CA and its solutions help change the perspective from “another IT project” to an ongoing IT service excellence program focused on driving business growth. WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 1
    • SECTION 1: CHALLENGE Conflicting Directions Can Keep Service Excellence Out of Reach The Need to Move from What ITIL Describes to How It Can Be Achieved Even as more organizations embrace the reality that IT service excellence is essential to effectively compete, many stumble in their efforts to change current practice. Perhaps they tried to move in too many directions at once. Or, they decided to improve a single process, such as incident management, without consideration for the linkages to other critical processes. When this happens, organizations often miss such items as when to begin defining services; how to define service level agreements and financial targets; what skills and resources are required; and what cultural changes are involved. And it’s more than likely that these organizations don’t have the visibility to associate technology assets with the services they support. Incredibly, many infrastructure managers don’t make the association between business services and IT. Historically, IT has focused on the reliability and availability of systems and components — not on which IT services the technology supports, their business context or value. When a business unit requests a new or enhanced service to meet customer needs, there is often little or no consideration for what it takes to deploy and sustain this service. Similarly, IT has no sense of a business priority, resulting in the completion of lower-level activities before growth-enabling services are deployed. And, it is not uncommon for change in one part of the business to bring down a critical service in another, leaving IT and the business in a state of reactive chaos. What these organizations lack and are striving for is at the core of service excellence — a true conversion to IT Service Management (ITSM). With ITSM, the focus is on creating and managing services across their lifecycle, from planning and delivering new IT services to maintaining and supporting day-to-day activities — all within a cycle of continual improvement. It requires moving both traditional IT and the business from thinking internally and operating in isolation on a project-by-project basis to a service-oriented and business- driven culture, integrated across the enterprise and focused on creating value to the customer. Cleary, this is easier said than done. Elevated to Business Imperative A common language and set of expectations among IT and the business is essential. For years, that language has been available in the volumes from the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL). At version 3 (v3), ITIL continues to provide a common framework of ITSM best practices, but it now elevates ITSM to a business imperative. With more prescriptive direction than earlier versions and a focus on the service lifecycle, ITIL v3 heralds true integration over IT alignment for the business/IT relationship. 2 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • Still, a chasm remains between what needs to be done, which ITIL describes, and the best route for a particular organization, which IT must determine. This gap, and the complexity of translating ITIL’s critical guidance to actionable change, presents a significant challenge that can derail initiatives to distinguish service quality. Attention to People, Process and Technology for a Healthy ITIL Ecosystem The points of derailment often center in one of three areas: people, process or technology. Thus, attention to each is essential for an ITIL ecosystem to flourish. People circumvent a process when they don’t understand its relevance, which often happens when they don’t have the information to understand what, why and how so-called best practices will change their organization and jobs for the better. Automation of repetitive procedures and workflows, which requires technology, is important both to engage people, so they can contribute at a more strategic level and to assure those processes improve services. This paper discusses how CA helps organizations simplify ITIL v3 implementations by reducing complexity and keeping them on track with CA ITSM process maps. These maps, which are CA’s visual interpretation of ITIL v3, borrow from the concept of an urban subway system. As such, they provide an easy-to-navigate, high-level view of the ITIL terrain that IT executives, business managers and implementation experts alike can understand and follow. CA’s comprehensive approach to ITIL v3 adoption encourages senior management to champion, train and understand performance measurements. The result is a faster, smoother journey — with tremendous opportunities for business growth along the way. SECTION 2: OPPORTUNITY ITIL is the Means; Service Excellence is the Destination Organizations that master ITIL’s complexities and overcome internal obstacles to change are better able to accelerate the journey to service excellence. Transforming this library of best-practice guidance into action gives a business the opportunity to wholly transform its business units and IT into a service-oriented culture, where cross-functional teams are unified in the common pursuit of service excellence and IT/business integration. But, it’s by no means an overnight transformation. ITIL best practices bring disruptive change and an organization needs to anticipate some resistance and plan for resolution. Also, it’s essentially a nonstop journey, based on the principles of W. Edwards Deming, whose quality circle defines a system of continuous improvement as illlustrated in a cycle of Plan-Do-Check- Act (Figure A). WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 3
    • FIGURE A DEMING’S QUALITY CIRCLE To ensure continuous improvement across the service lifecycle, the processes for adopting ITIL v3 best practices should also align with the well-known cycle of Continuous Improvement Plan-Do-Check-Act, developed by W. Edwards Deming. D 2 1 P 3 4 C A Maturity Quality Management 1. Plan 2. Do 3. Check 4. Act Determine the Optimal Path A proven, successful path to ITSM best practices is one navigated from a high-level, strategic view with consideration for people, process and technology — the key components of a flourishing ITIL ecosystem. It’s critical that neither ITIL nor ITSM are seen strictly as IT initiatives. Rather, the newly integrated business/IT team needs to apply best practices to service delivery and service support, and to continuously improve services across their lifecycle. The service lifecycle is described in Table B. Universally, the first step on the ITIL journey to service excellence is to assure that stakeholders across the organization understand “where we are now.” Moving forward requires that these same people understand “where we need to go” and then “how we need to proceed.” These items will be unique to each organization. There are many different pathways based on pressing needs, current capabilities and the assessed maturity level of existing processes. These factors are helpful to determine the readiness of an organization to adopt an ITIL v3 approach to ITSM. And to gain momentum, organizations are encouraged to choose specific, well-documented pain points and apply ITIL best practices to move to the next level of maturity. In this way, organizations gain controls where they may not have had any and are able to achieve near-term results. 4 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • FIGURE B THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE PHASES ITIL v3 extends ITSM processes across the five phases of the service lifecycle. Process activities, requirements, procedures, roles and responsibilities Service Strategy Design, develop and implement service management; Continual Service can be tailored to any organization. this is the control center for policies and objectives. Improvement Maintain and Service Design Design and develop the architecture, processes, policy create new value and documents associated with strategic IT services, for the customer defined in phase 1; design goal is to meet current and through design future business requirements. improvement, new service introduction Service Transition Develop and improve capabilities to transition new and and operation. modified services to production. Service Operation Effectively and efficiently provide and support services to ensure value for the customer and service provider. A Visual Framework to Make Sense of Each Step and Interrelationship With complete visibility into existing processes using an easy-to-understand framework, organizations can ease complexity and prevent unproductive detours that can disrupt initiatives to improve service. This visual framework is a series of CA ITSM process maps. Modeled after the interrelated maps of an urban subway system, they illustrate every process (or track), each activity (or station) and the key relationships that are relevant to navigating continuous IT service improvement. The goal in any implementation is to avoid detours and delays en route to change. As such, the CA ITSM process maps are designed for stakeholders across the organization to navigate and follow as they would a subway map. They don’t need to understand the entire system — the density and complexity of the ITIL volumes. They simply need to get from point A to point B and stay on course to “continuously improve” rather than “continuously revisit” IT service management. This new paradigm for business operations — IT/business integration with a shared focus on service excellence — requires buy-in from the top down, as well as important roles for technology and education. Among the capabilities enabled by technology are: • Portfolios of service catalogs • Service level monitoring • Financial stewardship and transparency WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 5
    • Service Strategy is the Control Center A subway system has a central point of management to coordinate many levels of tracks and stations. Likewise, the control center for processes, activities and key interfaces of an ITIL journey resides with the Service Strategy phase. Think of this as the “circle line” that forms the heart of the maps. The first phase of the service lifecycle, Service Strategy offers a significant competitive advantage. Before moving in any direction, business and IT decision makers join together to define what services will add the most value for customers. And, customer value equals business value. To reduce risk and optimize business/IT integration across the service lifecycle, strategic controls are needed along the way, as illustrated on the three points of the triangle centered in the Plan-Do-Check-Act quality circle (Figure C). They are: • Service Portfolio Management • Demand Management • Financial Management These strategic controls help in evaluating, prioritizing and assuring the appropriate levels of financial and human resources for existing and new services. They compel strategic thinking: Do we have to realign projects and priorities to make this service a reality? Can we afford it? What is it worth to the business and to the customer? At the same time, these controls provide visibility into other strategic initiatives and the relationship to business value. 6 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • FIGURE C SERVICE STRATEGY AND CONTINUAL SERVICE IMPROVEMENT Strategic controls at the Plan-Do- Check-Act intersections help reduce risk and optimize the IT/business relationship and integration. CH O Service Portfolio Management D EC K Demand Financial AN Management Management A CT PL Traversing Critical Service Lifecycle Phases using the CA ITSM Process Maps Once defined based on business strategy, new services emerge after following the three phases of the service lifecycle, the process maps for Service Design, Service Transition and Service Operation. Using these maps, along with expertise and technology from CA, an organization can keep moving forward to service excellence. Each map clearly illustrates the process intersections and process activities along with quality and control mechanisms. Attention paid to those interrelationships and interdependencies pays back in greater efficiency and effectiveness. The role of incident management, for example, is to quickly restore service. But, unless the root-cause is identified (problem management) and a correction implemented and moved to operations (change management), organizations will continually revisit the same issues. WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 7
    • In the Service Design phase (Figure D), a service specification is produced for each new IT service, major change or IT service retirement. The process activities, junctions and checkpoints help an IT organization do the following: • Associate a new service with a business requirement • Determine whether it has — or can trade off or invest in — the availability, capacity and security to support the service • Define and deliver the levels of service the business needs and is willing to fund FIGURE D CA ITSM PROCESS MAP FOR SERVICE DESIGN The CA ITSM Process map for Service Design visualizes the journey to define all aspects of an IT service Service Catalog and its requirements through each lifecycle phase. Service Design Management Availability Management Maintain Business Services Test Deliver Required Monitor Resources Services Build Specify Adjust and Tune Methods/ Continuity Techniques Requirements Set Security Controls Assess & Forecast Model/Trend Classify Assets Requirements Document Service Definition CH Info. Security O Service Portfolio D EC Maintain Management Policy Management K Analyze Performance Build Catalog Analyze Contents Manage Test Security Incidents Assess Risk Proactive Review Management Capacity Determine and Audit Build Plan Management Vulnerabilities Mitigate Risk Business Service Views Service Level AN Demand Financial A Management Management Management CT PL Technical Optimize Monitor Service Availability Demand Views Revise Service Customer Monitor Design SLA SLAs / OLAs Review Satisfaction Performance Framework Manage Publish Issues Live Services Catalog Operational Service Catalog Management Key Intersections IT Service Services Service Level Management Report Achievements Continuity IT Service Continuity Management Strategic Controls Meet Business Requirements Management Capacity Management Info. Security Management Strategic Inputs Availability Management Continual Service Improvement Configuration Management System 8 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • In the CA ITSM Process map for Service Transition (Figure E), the critical junction with configuration management is crossed. ITSM demands the active management of configuration items and relationships that are critical to business services. A configuration management database (CMDB) provides the business context for IT services, for example, to understand the impact of service change and to perform impact risk analysis. FIGURE E CA ITSM PROCESS MAP FOR SERVICE TRANSITION The CA ITSM Process map for Service Transition visualizes the journey to develop and improve capabilities as new or modified services are moved Service Transition to production. Schedule Change Maintain Accurate Service Service Configurations Validation Release and and Testing CAB Review Deployment Management Execute (Emergency/ Standard) Audit Adopt Best Practices Evaluation/ Decision Business Planning Responsiveness Validate & Verify Impact Analysis Transition Planning and Status Reports Support CH O Service Portfolio Management D EC Develop Strategy Ensure K Preparation Release Value Perform Preparation Tests and Planning Build Verify Schedule Knowledge Transfer Demand Financial Deploy AN Management Management A Prioritize Configuration CT Change PL Control Management Manage Build/Release RFC Categorize Analysis Monitor and Report Report/ Coordinate Closure Resources Identify Configurations Manage Assure and Plan Service Validation and Testing Key Intersections Quality Service Asset and Configuration Management Strategic Controls Change Management Transition Planning and Support Release and Deployment Strategic Inputs Management Service Asset and Configuration Continual Service Improvement Configuration Management System Management WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 9
    • The Service Operations phase of the lifecycle, as shown by the CA ITSM Process map for Service Operation (Figure F), is typically where organizations have begun the ITIL journey — to simply address the complexities of “keeping the lights on.” Its role in the service lifecycle has far reaching impact, as its “tracks” are responsible for executing processes that optimize the cost and quality of services. In the next section, we will walk through a sample journey that starts with incident management to understand how the process map linkages work. FIGURE F CA ITSM PROCESS MAP FOR SERVICE OPERATION The CA ITSM Process map for Service Operation visualizes the journey to improve day-to-day IT processes by providing essential service support to Service Operation Incident ensure continuous business operations. Secure Management Service Access Prevent and Eliminate Problems Monitor / Track Raise Incident Informed Decisions Resolve Event Request Record Management Fulfillment Service Request (Incl. Self-Service) Error Control CH O Service Portfolio Filter / Correlate Detect (Incl. Fault Detection) D EC Management K Provide Executive Select Response Rights Policy Transfer/ Disseminate Review/ Action Transform Verify to Usable Record Knowledge Automate Investigate Access Request and Control Store Info. Diagnose Problem Demand Financial Management AN Management Management A CT Escalate PL Access Management Problem Known Control Errors Capture Info. Work Approval Around (Financial, Compliance) Fulfillment Resolve/ Deliver Recover Standardized Services Problem Management Key Intersections Restore Service Knowledge Incident Management Management Event Management Strategic Controls Request Fulfillment Knowledge Management Strategic Inputs Access Management Continual Service Improvement Configuration Management System 10 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • The most commonly implemented ITIL process is incident management (Figure G), because it’s a direct line to what enterprises are experiencing and represents a critical output to the other supporting processes. FIGURE G A SAMPLE JOURNEY – OPTIMIZING INCIDENT MANAGEMENT The goal of incident management, as illustrated as the last stop on the track, is to restore service as quickly as possible. Along the route, there are stations (process activities) that should Service Operation Incident be in place to optimize this ITSM Secure Service Access Management process, including event management Prevent and Eliminate Problems and request fulfillment. These are now Monitor / Track incorporated into v3 to address rapid Raise Incident Informed restoration of services. Decisions Resolve Event E vent Request R equest q t Record Management M anagement g t Fulfillment F l illment Service Request (Incl. Self-Service) Erro Error Control o Control CH O Service P S Portfolio Filter / Correlate Detect (Incl. Fault Detection) D E EC Management g K Provide Executive utive Executive Select Response Rights Pol cy lic Policy Transfer/ Disseminate Review// Action Transform Verify to Usable Rec Record cord Knowledge g Knowledge Automate Inv vestigate Investigate Access Request a and Control Store Info. Info D Diagnose P bl Problem Demand ma Financial n Financial Management M g t AN ge Management g A A A Management Management CT Escalate PL P P Access A ccess Management M g t Problem Problem Known Contr Control Errors Capture Info. Work Around Approval (Financial, Compliance) Fulfillment Resolve/ Deliver Recover Standardized Services Restore Knowledge K l d ge Problem Management Key Intersections Service Incident Management Management M anagement g t Event Management Strategic Controls Request Fulfillment Knowledge Management Strategic Inputs Access Management Continual Service Improvement Configuration Management System WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 11
    • The P-D-C-A junctions — the “circle line” — serve as a means to gather or contribute inputs from other processes and process maps. For example, incident management crosses the ACT junction because actions are required to restore services to the agreed service level. Crossing the CHECK junction is visualized because incident management gauges the effectiveness of other processes. For example, incident management can never be fully optimized without effective change management (located on the service transition map) to prevent unauthorized changes from introducing more unplanned service disruptions. Down the line, most organizations will want to link incident management and problem management. Proceeding through the P-D-C-A cycle (Figure H) is a means to link process relationships to continual service improvement. Ultimately, finding the root cause of a problem and instituting a fix in the IT infrastructure results in the need for a change request. ACT JUNCTION: THE INTERSECTION OF INCIDENT MANAGEMENT FIGURE H AND PROBLEM MANAGEMENT TRACKS A process focused on removing problems, the problem management track starts at the ACT junction. Service Operation Incident Secure Management Service Access Prevent and Eliminate Problems Monitor / Track Raise Incident Informed Decisions Resolve Event E t R equest Request q t Record Management M g t Fu lfillment Fulfillment e t Service Request (Incl. Self-Service) Erro Error Control o Control CH O S Service Portfolio P Filter / Correlate Detect (Incl. Fault Detection) D E EC Management g K Provide Execu ive Executive Select Response Rights Pol y Policy Transfer/ Disseminate Review// Action Transform Verify to Usable Re Record ecord Knowledge g Knowledge Automate Inv vestigate Investigate Access Request a and Control Store Info. Info D Diagnose Problem Demand ma Financial n Financial Management AN Escalate A ge Management g A A Management Management CT PL A ccess Access M anagement Management g t Problem Problem Known Contr Control Errors Capture Info. Work Around Approval (Financial, Compliance) Fulfillment Resolve/ Deliver Recover Standardized Services Restore Problem Management Key Intersections Service K Knowledge l d ge Incident Management M Management g t Event Management Strategic Controls Request Fulfillment Knowledge Management Strategic Inputs Access Management Continual Service Improvement Configuration Management System 12 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • The junctions are also used to highlight the key intersection points for the Service Transition or Service Design process maps spanning the service lifecycle. An accepted change request is elevated to the Service Transition map from the Service Operation map (Figure I) via the CHECK Junction; then proceeds down the change management track (Figure J) and the change is deployed into production by the release management process. FIGURE I NAVIGATING BETWEEN SERVICE OPERATION AND SERVICE TRANSITION PROCESS MAPS A change request is created from the problem management track. The change request is elevated to the service transition track from the service operations via the Check junction and continues down the change management track. WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 13
    • FIGURE J DO JUNCTION: CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND RELEASE AND DEPLOYMENT MANAGEMENTS TRACKS Changes are deployed into production by the release management process. Service Transition Schedule Change Maintain Accurate Service S i Service Configurations V lid i Validation R l Release and d a d i g and Testing CAB Review Deployment D pl y t Management M anagement g t Execute (Emergency/ Standard) Audit Adopt p Best Practices Evaluation/ Decision Business Planning Responsiveness Validate & Verify p Impact Analysis T Transition i i Planning and Pl i g d Status Reports Repo t eports S pp t Support CH O Servic P ce Service Portfolio Man g naggement Management D EC Develop C C Strategy Ensure K Preparation Release Value Perform m Preparation p Tests and Planning Build Verify Schedule Knowledge Transfer m Demand Financial an Deploy AN Management g M g Management A Prioritize Configur Configuration ration CT C C C Change PL PL Con rol ntr Control Management Mana e age a Manage Build/Release Build/Re ease Build/ ele e RFC Categorize Analysis Monitor and Report Report/ p Coordinate Closure Resources Identify Configurations Manage Assure and Plan Service Validation and Testing Key Intersections Quality Service Asset and Configuration Management Strategic Controls Change Management Transition Planning and Support Release and Deployment Strategic Inputs Management i d Service Asset and Configuration Continual Service Improvement C fig i n Configuration Management System Management M g t Note how release management ends near the start of incident management — a graphical depiction of the business reality that with every change release, there is a chance for more incidents. So the cycle begins again. Planned and implemented with the appropriate expertise and technology, it’s a cycle of continuously improving service performance. 14 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • SECTION 3: BENEFITS High Standards and a Simplified Approach Lead to Innovation A high standard for IT Service Management gives an organization a way to distinguish itself in an increasingly competitive global environment. ITIL plays an important role, with 77 percent of respondents in a 2007 Forrester survey reporting that they would have experienced better quality of delivery from IT if ITIL had been adopted.1 Automation of ITIL best practices, enabled by new technology, can translate into fewer resources required to maintain status quo, freeing a business to innovate with leading-edge services to increase competitive advantage. IT and the business become partners in this innovation, which leads to higher quality services that customers demand and that can set a business apart. CA and its solutions help organizations change the perspective from “another IT project” to a continuous IT service excellence program focused on driving business growth. CA’s ITSM process maps, backed by CA solutions for Service Management, enable the high standards and simplified approach that a business needs to: • Accelerate business value • Integrate the business/IT relationship and make IT more proactive as a strategic partner • Remove complexity and make business services easier to manage • Increase accountability and transparency • Control costs • Embody a service-oriented, customer-focused culture • Make IT services more reliable and available • Improve service and value to the business and customers WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 15
    • SECTION 4 Conclusions The goal of IT Service Management is to improve service by optimizing technology, controlling costs and maximizing the time and talent of an organization’s most valuable resource — its people. As such, ITIL provides an excellent vehicle for tackling the journey to service excellence. However, as a notoriously complex framework, ITIL provides the “what” not the “how to” or even “where to start.” For this, organizations need a partner with the competency and capabilities to accelerate the ITIL journey by unifying the three critical elements of a healthy ITIL ecosystem — people, process and technology. CA does this with ITSM process maps, ITIL expertise and technology to integrate and automate ITIL processes. CA’s Academy of Service Excellence offers basic and advanced training and tactical and strategic guidance to educate and unite entire organizations around ITIL principles and goals. The CA ITSM process maps come to life for executives who can sit in the “control center” for a simulation to see how communications across organizations, process structure and enabling technologies can affect schedules, costs and business growth. SECTION 5 References Forrester Research, February 14, 2007, “Who Changed my Network?” 16 WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS
    • SECTION 6 About the Authors Nancy Hinich Nancy Hinich is a world-wide ITIL Solution Manager. She consults with senior management of CA Services customer organizations to quantify the opportunity for ITIL best practices and advises them on implementation programs for business service improvements. She has ten years of IT experience and holds a Manager’s Certificate in IT Service Management. Robert Sterbens Robert Sterbens is the Sr. Director of Solutions Marketing driving ITIL Service Management CA Solutions Marketing initiatives across CA. He is responsible for developing marketing strategies and business plans for ITIL. Robert is currently a member of the itSMF USA Advisory Board where he provides technology and thought leadership and is ITIL v3 Foundation Certified. WHITE PAPER: ITSM PROCESS MAPS 17
    • CA (NSD: CA), one of the world’s leading independent, enterprise management software companies, unifies and simplifies complex information technology (IT) management across the enterprise for greater business results. With our Enterprise IT Management vision, solutions and expertise, we help customers effectively govern, manage and secure IT. 32982