CSAR Legacy
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CSAR Legacy Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CSAR Legacy Michael T. Heath February 21, 2007 ©2007 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois ©
  • 2. Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets
    • Detailed, whole-system simulation of solid propellant rockets under normal and abnormal operating conditions
    • Accurate models of physical components
    • Subscale simulations of materials and accident scenarios
    • Software framework to facilitate component integration
    • Computational infrastructure to support large-scale simulations
    • Research collaborations with government laboratories and rocket industry
    Overarching Goal: Simulation of solid propellant rockets from first principles STS Discovery
  • 3. Solid Rocket Booster Igniter Case Core flow Propellant Nozzle Joint & slot Ammonium perchlorate (oxidizer) Polymeric binder and aluminum particles (fuel) 200  m Micrograph of solid propellant
  • 4. Challenges in Rocket Simulation
    • Full 3-D modeling essential to capture physics
    • Strong, nonlinear coupling among components
    • Complex, dynamically changing geometry
    • Extremely diverse spatial and temporal scales
    • Complex material properties and physical processes
    • Enormous computational capacity required for high-resolution simulation of full burn
    • Scalability to 1000s of processors essential
  • 5. CSAR Legacy
    • Rocstar code
    • Major simulations
    • Fundamental research
    • Impact
      • Campus
      • State and local
      • National and international
    • Human resources
    • Lessons learned
    Aft Joint Slot Forward Joint Slot Titan IV Turbulence
  • 6. Rocstar Code Suite
    • Nation’s only 3-D integrated simulation capability for solid rocket motors
    • How did we accomplish this?
      • Adequate financial resources
      • Long time horizon
      • Critical mass of talent across disciplines
      • Availability of massively parallel platforms
    • Now in position to solve problems of national interest, and already doing so
      • Five-segment RSRM for lunar program
    Fully-coupled RSRM — fluid temperature and propellant stress profiles
  • 7. Rocstar Code Suite
    • Scalable to thousands of processors
    • Applicable to many other problems
      • Fluid-structure interaction
      • Reactive, multiphase flows
    • Examples
      • Pyrovalve
      • Helicopter blades
      • Volcanoes
      • Tall buildings
    NASA Booster Separation Motor
  • 8. Major Simulations “Science with the Code”
    • Full RSRM
    • Titan propellant slumping
    • Turbulence around flexible inhibitor
    • Aluminum impingement on nozzle
    Al particles impacting nozzle Flow field near slumping propellant
  • 9. Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification
    • Verification
      • Convergence studies
      • Comparison with analytical solutions
      • Method of manufactured solutions
      • Comparison between codes
        • e.g., do Rocflo and Rocflu give similar results for same problem?
      • Code coverage
      • Coupled codes — verify component codes first
    • Validation
      • RSRM (ATK/Thiokol & NASA)
      • Titan IV (Lockheed Martin)
      • 15 and 70 lb BATES (AFRL)
      • Lab scale rocket (NAWC)
      • Attitude Control Motor (Aerojet)
      • Shock tube with thin steel panel
    • New sampling techniques for UQ
  • 10. Navy “StarAft” Motor
    • Full burnout
    • Tactical motor
  • 11. Titan IV Motor
    • Heavy-lift booster
    • Accident scenario
    • Detailed vorticity studies
  • 12. NASA RSRM
    • Late stage in full burn (~100 s)
    • Flexible inhibitor
    • 3-D vorticity study
  • 13. NASA RSRM
    • Burnout simulation
      • Red is burning propellant; blue is at insulated surface
    • Viewing
      • Propellant/fluid interface
      • Inhibited surfaces
    • Unique capabilities
      • High rate “time zooming”
      • Significant burnout — never seen in industry
      • Case constraints
      • Propellant walkback
      • Inhibitor regression
      • Dynamically changing topology
    Initially inhibited surface
  • 14. Fundamental Research in Fluids and Combustion
    • Multiphase flow
      • Equilibrium Eulerian method for fine particles
      • Lagrangian superparticles
    • Turbulence modeling
      • Optimal LES
    • Time zooming
    • Propellant morphology
      • Parallel packing code
    • Propellant modeling
      • 3-D simulations with Rocfire
  • 15. Fundamental Research in Structures and Materials
    • Constitutive and damage modeling
      • Heterogeneous propellants and HE
      • Metallic components
    • Crack propagation
      • Burning, pressure driven
    • Multiscale materials modeling
    • Molecular-level modeling of material interfaces
    • Space-time discontinuous Galerkin methods
  • 16. Fundamental Research in Computer Science & Applied Math
    • Parallel programming environments
      • Charm++, AMPI, ParFUM
    • Parallel I/O
      • Panda
    • Parallel performance monitoring/modeling
      • Rocprof
    • Meshing
      • Mesh smoothing, repair, and remeshing
      • Mesh quality metrics
      • Hybrid geometric/topological partitioner
    • Visualization
      • Rocketeer
  • 17. Fundamental Research in Integration Methodology
    • Object-oriented integration framework
    • Flexible parallel orchestration
    • Stable component coupling and time-stepping
    • Accurate and conservative data transfer based on common refinement
    • Stable and efficient explicit surface propagation
  • 18. Computational Science and Engineering Education Program 13 departments 130 faculty associates 130 grad students 10 graduate fellows Research Program Computational Science & Engineering Option Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets Center for Process Simulation and Design DOE funded $4-5 million per year 10 year program 20 faculty 35 graduate students 5 undergrads 20 professional staff NSF funded $6 million over 6 years 12 faculty 13 students & postdocs Midwest Structural Sciences Center AFRL funded $5 million over 5 years 10 faculty 15 students & postdocs ©2007 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
  • 19. Campus Impact
    • CSAR put CSE “on the map”
    • CSAR followed by two additional centers hosted by CSE
      • Center for Process Simulation and Design
      • Midwest Structural Sciences Center
    • CSE seen as “center of centerness” on campus, advising other groups seeking or establishing centers
    • CSE taken as model in developing other new interdisciplinary programs (e.g., bioinformatics)
    • CSE’s Turing cluster
      • Established value of large-scale computing facilities for local users
      • Financial commitment from campus administration
  • 20. Turing G5 Xserve Cluster
    • 1536 compute processors
    • Dual 2GHz G5 processors per node
      • 4GB RAM per node
      • Myrinet interconnection network
    • 6 Xserve head nodes
      • 49TB Xserve RAID
    • 512 and 256 node partitions
      • 23 racks (15 and 8 racks, respectively)
    • Mac OS 10.4 Server
  • 21. State and Local Impact
    • Economic development through industrial collaborations
      • Boeing, Caterpillar
    • Visibility of simulation promoted through various venues
    • Recurring appearances in media (TV, newspapers)
    RSRM inhibitor vorticity Flexible inhibitor
  • 22. National and International Impact
    • Publications (~900 journal articles and proceedings)
    • Conference sessions
    • Industrial collaborations
      • ATK Thiokol
      • Aerojet
      • Boeing
      • Caterpillar
    • Other government agency funded research
      • USAF
      • NASA
    • Technology transfer to and from NNSA labs
    • Participation in Integrated Product Team for USAF solid propulsion program
  • 23. Pedagogical Impact 1st edition, 1997 2nd edition, 2002
  • 24. Human Resources
    • Supported 160 graduate students, about 40 of whom have gone on to DOE labs and many others to positions in government or industry
    • Recruited and developed 50 research staff members, many of whom have gone on to positions at DOE labs, industry, and academia
    • Contributed to faculty career development (promotions, awards, etc.), counter to conventional wisdom about collaboration
  • 25. CSAR Students and Staff in DOE/NNSA Labs
      • Boyana Norris, ANL
      • Michael Parks, SNL
      • Jason Petti, SNL
      • Ali Pinar, LBNL
      • Jason Quenneville, LANL
      • Christopher Siefert, SNL
      • Donald Siegel, SNL
      • Christopher Tomkins, LANL
      • Michael Tonks, LANL
      • Jason Weber, BBL
      • Bradley Wescott, LANL
      • Amanda White, LANL
      • Steven Wojtkiewicz, SNL
      • Jin Yao, LLNL
      • Jack Yoh, LLNL
    • Former CSAR Staff Now at DOE Labs (5)
      • Michael Ham, ORNL (LANL)
      • Dennis Parsons, LLNL
      • James Quirk, LANL
      • Mark Short, LANL
      • Jeff Vetter, LLNL (ORNL)
    • Former CSAR Students Now at DOE Labs (34)
      • Tyler Alumbaugh, LLNL
      • Balakumar Balasubramanium, LANL
      • Michael Bange, LANL
      • Benjamin Chorpening, SNL
      • Nathan Crane, SNL
      • Zhiqun Deng, PNNL
      • Erik Draeger, LLNL
      • Michelle Duesterhaus, SNL
      • Jeff Grossman, LBNL (LLNL )
      • Arne Gullerud, SNL
      • Thomas Hafenrichter, SNL
      • Rebecca Hartman-Baker, ORNL
      • Jason Hales, SNL
      • Jonghyun Lee, ANL
      • Vanessa Lopez, LBNL
      • Xiaosong Ma, ORNL
      • Greg Mackey, SNL
      • Burkhard Militzer, LLNL
      • Jeffrey Murphy, SNL-L
    Gray now in other employment.
  • 26. What Worked Well?
    • Single, over-arching application
      • Maintain focus, avoid mission creep
    • Pre-existing, interdisciplinary framework independent of individual academic departments
    • Tight integration of CS with application disciplines
    • Professional staff in addition to faculty and students
    • Wealth of thesis-sized research issues for graduate students
    • Pipeline of students from Illinois to lab employment
  • 27. What Could Have Worked Better?
    • Collaborations with NNSA labs were numerous, but could have been tighter and more comprehensive
    • Suggestions for improvement
      • Common application focus between labs and university
      • Deeper commitment to joint activities, such as long-term visits and joint hiring (e.g., postdocs)
      • Two-way software exchanges
  • 28. ©2007 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois http://www.csar.uiuc.edu ©
  • 29. Prof. Michael T. Heath, Director Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2270 Digital Computer Laboratory 1304 West Springfield Avenue Urbana, IL 61801 USA [email_address] http://www.csar.uiuc.edu telephone: 217-333-6268 fax: 217-333-1910