Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses

on

  • 310 views

Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses

Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses

Statistics

Views

Total Views
310
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
310
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • The definition of “knowledge work” varies widely. Some observers place up to 80% of the US workforce in a “knowledge work” job; others say 30%. For a deeper analysis of “knowledge work” jobs, the Work Design Collaborative White Paper (March 2007) by James Ware and Charles Gratham outlined a typology of knowledge work that required describing the specific role according to seven dimensions of work activity: purpose process structure (how structured/controlled is the work process) outcome structure (how structured/predictable/controllable are the work outcomes) interactivity (how much communication is required with others) place (is the work by its nature required to happen in a specific place) proximity (does the work have to happen co-located with other work) time (does the work by its nature have time requirements). Ware and Gratham also boil these seven dimensions down into three main categories: The degree of structure in the work and its outcomes The type of knowledge produced, and the way it is used The extent to which the knowledge is individual or collaborative. These three categories then influence how the work can be performed over time and space. The terms “professional managerial” class and “mass upper middle”: from Brookings Institute working paper, The Decline of the White Working Class and the Rise of a Mass Upper Middle Class , April 2008. “ Symbolic analysts” – from Robert Reich. “ Creative Class” – from Richard Florida.
  • The definition of “knowledge work” varies widely. Some observers place up to 80% of the US workforce in a “knowledge work” job; others say 30%. For a deeper analysis of “knowledge work” jobs, the Work Design Collaborative White Paper (March 2007) by James Ware and Charles Gratham outlined a typology of knowledge work that required describing the specific role according to seven dimensions of work activity: purpose process structure (how structured/controlled is the work process) outcome structure (how structured/predictable/controllable are the work outcomes) interactivity (how much communication is required with others) place (is the work by its nature required to happen in a specific place) proximity (does the work have to happen co-located with other work) time (does the work by its nature have time requirements). Ware and Gratham also boil these seven dimensions down into three main categories: The degree of structure in the work and its outcomes The type of knowledge produced, and the way it is used The extent to which the knowledge is individual or collaborative. These three categories then influence how the work can be performed over time and space. The terms “professional managerial” class and “mass upper middle”: from Brookings Institute working paper, The Decline of the White Working Class and the Rise of a Mass Upper Middle Class , April 2008. “ Symbolic analysts” – from Robert Reich. “ Creative Class” – from Richard Florida.
  • Notes from the Deloitte & Touche research: 1 – The Employment Policy Foundation 2 – Two Careers, One Marriage: Making it Work in the Workplace New York: Catalyst, 1998. With updated data for 2005 from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Annual Social and Economic Supplement, Current Population Survey Washington, DC: GPO, 2005. 3 – U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2005). Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2003 and Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2002-03 (NCES 2005-154). 4 – Jody Miller, “Get a Life!” Fortune, November 28, 2005. 5 – Families and Work Institute, Generation & Gender in the Workplace (New York: American Business Collaboration, 2004). 6 – WebSiteOptimization.com “China to Pass U.S. in Total Broadband Lines” October 2006 NOTES 5 – Work-centric: defined as putting your job before your family; family-centric: putting family before work; dual-centric: placing the same priority on family and work.
  • Notes from the Deloitte & Touche research: Sources: “ Plateau Accelerates International Expansion,” Business Wire, 17 October 2007. International Labor Office Bureau of Statistics, LABORSTA, “Economically Active Population Estimates and Projections: 1980-2020.” Joseph McDaniel McCool, “Asia’s Hungry for Management Talent: Economic expansion is increasing the demand for experienced executives, and Pacific Rim businesses are learning the ways of the headhunter,” BusinessWeek Online, 20 November 2007. International Labor Office Bureau of Statistics, LABORSTA, “Household Income and Expenditure Statistics: Australia and Hong Kong.” International Labor Office Bureau of Statistics, LABORSTA, “SEGREGAT: Employment by Sex and Detailed Occupational Groups: China and the United Kingdom.” Catalyst and Families and Work Institute, “Leaders in a Global Economy: A study of executive women and men,” Greg Brown, “The Power Employers: What does it take to find the best employees and keep them?” Latin Trade, 1 December 2007. Joseph McDaniel McCool, “Asia’s Hungry for Management Talent: Economic expansion is increasing the demand for experienced executives, and Pacific Rim businesses are learning the ways of the headhunter,” BusinessWeek Online, 20 November 2007.
  • Notes from the Deloitte & Touche research: While many US women do not work full time throughout their career, the average time spent not working is 2.2 years. Of researcher-identified “high potential” women who stepped out of the workforce, 93% wanted to step back into workforce, but only 43% did so full time.
  • Not every person in a generation will share all of the characteristics, but the examples are indicative of general patterns. Individuals born at one end of the date range or the other may see overlapping characteristics with the preceding or succeeding generation.
  • Points above from various sources, including Carolyn Martin’s and Bruce Tulgan’s work on Generation Y in the workplace, and also Deloitte & Touche’s projects with Institute for the Future related to Generation Y in the workforce. Evidence shows that Gen Y thinks job mobility is important -- when combined with other Gen Y attitudinal research, job mobility appears to be important because it provides a variety of advantages (the opportunity to develop skills, allows for variety in job tasks, ability for worker to select between different jobs vs. being “locked in” to one job without a viable alternative) – thus improving the worker’s opportunity to control the conditions of his / her working and personal life. Findings show, however, that some Gen Yers are willing (and some may prefer) to find mobility inside a company, rather than have to leave a company to find a new position. Many Gen Y are showing interest in company benefits such as health care and retirement programs; in the past, it was unusual for employees in their 20s to say that such programs were a priority for them. Some researchers have speculated that Gen Y has seen the upheaval in the workforce (layoffs, reductions in benefits) and how this upheaval has impacted their parents and older workers and therefore Gen Y are highly aware of how these employee benefits (or the lack of them) can impact an employee’s life. Findings from the IFTF studies for Deloitte show that Gen Y expects to have a number of jobs in their careers – more jobs than they would choose or prefer to have, which implies that they expect to be required to change jobs due to external demands (not only due to their own choice).
  • Pew Internet and American Life Project: report on Teens and Social Media (December 2007). Selected findings: 93% teens use the internet 64% online teens age 12-17 participate in content-creation activities (keeps trending up). Teens continue to be leaders in Web 2.0 trends. Both girls and boys participate; participation is higher in older age groups. 55% have a social networking profile Increase in teen bloggers from 2004-2006 (19% to 28%). Girls are predominant here. 35% of online girls blog vs. 20% of online teen boys; this gap has increased over time. 32% of teen girls 12-14 blog. Teens from lower income households and single-parent households are more likely to blog. Teens who are highly socially active online report also being highly socially active off-line. 57% of online teens use video sites. Boys are predominant (both in watching and uploading / posting videos). Content creation is not just about the artifacts. It’s also about participating in discussions about the content/ artifacts. Teens often build or contribute to other’s websites. This behavior is much more pronounced in teens than adults. Content creators and social network users report higher levels of daily communication. Digital images are a big part of teen life online. Images often get feedback and start a conversation. Some teens are multi-channel “super communicators” – they have access to multiple communication options and add new communication channels on top of existing ones (i.e. they keep using “older” technologies like land lines). “Super communicators” statistically tend to be older female teens. Email less commonly used than instant messaging, texting or social networking sites. Phones and face-to-face are still important to teens.
  • From the blog of the Digital Youth Research Project. Quoted from their website: “ Kids' Informal Learning with Digital Media: An Ethnographic Investigation of Innovative Knowledge Cultures' is a three year collaborative project funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Carried out by researchers at University of Southern California and University of California, Berkeley, the digital youth project explores how kids use digital media in their everyday lives.”
  • From The Kids Are Alright: How the Gamer Generation is Changing the Workplace by John Beck and Mitchell Wade. Computer games are a mainstream childhood/ youth experience for Gen Y. Games, game experience and game structure promote certain beliefs which are reflected in studies of gamers. Individual’s role is to be the star, the hero, the expert, the customer. The game is designed to make the player feel important and able to successfully engage in multiple interesting and challenging activities. Beliefs about how the world works, from the gamer perspective: : there’s always an answer; everything is possible things are often unrealistically simple, especially relationships between game characters (are defined by game constraints) goals are straightforward and usually quantifiable people who take risks can earn rewards; life is about competition status is visible and measurable; game characters often “wear” their status in visible objects and clothing that they acquired through successful game play the way to learn and succeed is via trial-and-error; just jump in and start playing; no “training” or study required failure is a temporary setback; repeated failures are inevitable and to be expected, based on time spent in-game and risks taken the most skilled player wins, and high skill can be developed by anyone who puts in enough time and effort formal authorities / game characters are often irrelevant and sometimes oppositional (giving misinformation, etc.). there are things a player must do alone; at other times, teamwork is essential to succeed if you aren’t getting what you expected from your current team/guild leader/game play peers, you should change teams. Unthinking loyalty gets you nowhere. learn from your peers, not from formal authorities or formal learning exercises expect to be deeply engaged and to have fun; if you aren’t having fun, something’s wrong. Work-applicable skills developed by gamers: solving intellectually challenging problems that require planning and effort over time persistence, and bouncing back from failure; failure is temporary and conditional learning and memorizing highly complex worlds, terminology, rules remote teaming and group coordination simultaneous multi-channel communications (in-game dialogue, phone, instant messaging – group comms and multiple one-on-ones) thinking on their feet under time pressure self-motivated, self-educating, just-in-time learning -- highly engaged desire to contribute to a meaningful endeavor (the individual determines what is meaningful) ability to quickly learn new technical / computer tools multi-tasking connecting with people, working together on joint projects focusing and optimizing time and resources: don’t waste time and effort on things that don’t advance you towards a goal that matter
  • Pew Internet and American Life Project – Future of the Internet II report (September 2006) surveyed hundreds of internet leaders, activists, builders and commentators (742 respondents). The report stated there was “general agreement on how the technology will evolve – less agreement on the impact of this evolution.”
  • Laptops are increasingly the assumed common computer for business and for individuals. The Wall Street Journal’s Walt Mossberg now does his annual review of “best PCs for businesspeople” for laptops only, saying that the desktop versions are simply the non-mobile variant of the laptop (rather than the traditional view that the laptop was the mobile variant of the desktop). Quote from the Telework Coalition’s Telework Benchmarking Study Best Practices for Large-Scale Implementation in Private and Public Sector Organizations” Executive Summary dated 2006. Report also identified common technologies used by businesses to enable telework: laptops, VPNs, extended help desk support (often 24/7 and outsourced) increasingly VOIP, increasingly file sharing and collaboration tools. The Economist special report “Mobile Edition” April 10, 2008 had several articles on the trends in mobile technology and the behaviors of “urban nomads.” The “third space” is a concept of a location other than home and work, for people to gather; these third spaces are considered key to community formation and activity. The concept was discussed by Ray Oldenburg in his book The Great Good Place. Coffee shops and cafes are most often mentioned as a third space.
  • Examples of challenges that businesses are facing: fewer workforce segments are able or willing to work continuously full time during their entire career – particularly many women, but increasingly men as well. traditional assumptions that the most high-performing and valuable employees would also be full time, 110%+ contributors – does not apply when even the “type A / high performer” employees have life phases when they want to be less fully engaged at work due to other priorities (family or other interests). - Gen Y men and women want to set their own course, but are willing to stay in organizations that allow them to do so - aging Baby Boomers do not want to exit workforce completely and are looking for ways to remain involved at something other than a full-time commitment (“partial retirement”) - a large percentage of the population is developing significant technology-supported skill sets early in their life (pre-career: teens and early career: 20s). Employees are bringing those skill sets and expectations into their first job; they are not expecting those jobs to teach them those skill sets. technologies available in the consumer space are putting pressure on companies to provide and support similar tools for the workforce. In the absence of corporate support for their desired tools, some employees find grassroots ways to use their favorite tools despite corporate firewalls and policy restrictions. Andrew McAfee at Harvard studies Enterprise 2.0 technologies and their adoption by corporations. He discusses various cultural requirements and predicts eventual performance results by companies that are successfully able to absorb Enterprise 2.0 tools.

Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses Presentation Transcript

  • Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses Bill M Wooten, PhD FBLA Area V District Conference Cypress Ridge High School February 5, 2011
  • Which workers are we talking about?
    • “ A person who works primarily with information or who develops and uses knowledge in the workplace”
    • (from Wikipedia)
    Related labels: professional-managerial mass upper middle class web workers skilled workers symbolic analysts creative class “ Related labels” from: Robert Reich; Richard Florida; and the Brookings Institute working paper The Decline of the White Working Class and the Rise of a Mass Upper Middle Class (April 2008).
  • Which workers are we talking about?
    • “ A person who works primarily with information or who develops and uses knowledge in the workplace”
    • (from Wikipedia)
    Related labels: professional-managerial mass upper middle class web workers skilled workers symbolic analysts creative class “ Related labels” from: Robert Reich; Richard Florida; and the Brookings Institute working paper The Decline of the White Working Class and the Rise of a Mass Upper Middle Class (April 2008).
  • One Page Summary on the future of knowledge workers 1.There won’t be enough of them. 2.Their expectations will be different. 3.Technologies will transform when, where and how work is done.
  • Converging key trends are dramatically changing the US talent marketplace 1 Shrinking Pool of Skilled Labor 5 Evolving Expectations of Gen X and Gen Y 2 Changing Family Structures 3 Increasing Number of Women 6 Increasing Impact of Technology 4 Changing Expectations of Men By 2012, there will be a 6 million person gap between the supply and demand of knowledge workers in the U.S. Only 17% of households now have a husband in the workforce and a wife who is not, down from 63% in past generations. Nearly 60% of bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the U.S. are awarded to women. 84% of male executives agree they would like to realize professional aspirations while having more personal time. Baby boomers are almost twice as likely as Gen X/Y to be work-centric, with only 13% of Gen X/Y being work-centric. The remaining 87% of Gen X/Y are family-centric or dual-centric. 76% of households now have broadband connectivity while mobile phones, messaging and email has become pervasive .
  • And these trends are global, not just US 1 Shrinking Pool of Skilled Labor 5 Evolving Expectations of Gen X and Gen Y 2 Changing Family Structures 3 Increasing Number of Women 6 Increasing Impact of Technology 4 Changing Expectations of Men In 2006, 40% of companies worldwide reported difficulty filling jobs. 60% of households in Australia and Hong Kong have female heads of households. Since the 1980s, China and the UK have had double-digit increases in the percentage of women in the finance, legal, and medical professions. Men in Western Europe are more likely than women (20% vs.. 8%) to feel limited by the need to sacrifice everything for work. In Latin America and SE Asia, many employers have implemented programs to enhance work-life balance and encourage social responsibility. In the EU27, 54% of households had access to the internet during the first quarter of 2007 and 42% had a broadband connection.
  • Shrinking pool of skilled labor
    • By 2025, the working age population is expected to drop by 14 percent in Japan and by 7% in Germany
    • 76 million Baby Boomers in the U.S. will begin to reach retirement age
    • Domestic US labor force will only grow at rate of 1%
    • Low birth rates in many countries
    • Increased competition for skilled workers globally
    • Stagnant college graduation rates in US
    • Decline in competency in basic skills among US high school and even college graduates
    1
  • Increasing gap between number of jobs and number of workers Numeric Change in Labor Force by Age, Projected 2004 - 2014 (in Thousands) Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Labor Force, Occupational Outlook Quarterly 49, no. 4 (Washington, DC: GPO, Winter 2005/2006). By 2012, there will be a 6 million person gap between the supply and demand of knowledge workers in the U.S. 65+ 55-64 45-54 35-44 25-34 15-24 Copyright © 2008 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. Used with permission. From Deloitte research into workforce trends related to the Mass Career Customization initiative. 1
  • Changing family structures affecting roles Source: 1. Catalyst, Two Careers, One Marriage: Making it Work in the Workplace (New York: Catalyst, 1998) With updated data for 2005 from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Annual Social and Economic Supplement, Current Population Survey Washington, DC: GPO, 2005). Changing Family Structure 1950-2005 Only 17% of households now have a husband in the workforce and a wife who is not, down from 63% in 1950. 2 17.4% 63.4% 40.6% 20.4% 24.2% 10.8% 12.8% 3.5% 5.0% 1.8% 1950 2005 Male Single Parents Female Single Parents Other Families Dual-worker Families Traditional Families
  • Increasing number of women in paid work Source: W. Michael Cox & Richard Alms, “Scientists Are Made, Not Born” New York Times, 28 Feb, 2005; US Department of Education; US Department of Labor Law Medical MBA Dentistry Veterinary Pharmacy % Share of Professionals Degrees Awarded To Women
    • In 2007, women
    • comprise:
    • 58% of college students
    • 51% of new entrants to workforce
    • 48% of workforce
    The proportion of degrees awarded to women vs.. men in the US has risen sharply since the 1970s. 50% 3
  • Changing expectations of men towards work Male Executives Who Want to Realize Professional Aspirations While Having More Personal Time . . . . . Men today are less likely to sacrifice family and personal time for work. 4 Source: Jody Miller, “Get a Life!” Fortune, 28 November, 2005; Catalyst, Women and Men in US Corporate Leadership: Same Workplace, Different Realities, (New York: Catalyst 2004) Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Strongly Disagree 36% 12% 48% 4%
  • Evolving expectations Generations X and Y around work / life Baby Boomers (38-57) 41% 22% 37% Members of Generation Y are more family-centric than Baby Boomers “ We recognize that changes in work structures come with an economic cost, and we are willing to be paid less in exchange for a better working life.” Stanford Law students Andrew Canter and Craig Segall 50% 13% 37% Generation Y (under 23) 5 Work-Centric Family-Centric Dual-Centric
  • Four Generations at Work
  • Who are the Four Generations?
    • Matures
    • Born before 1946
    • 64 years and older
  • Who are the Four Generations?
    • Boomers
    • Born 1946 – 1964
    • 46 – 64 years old
  • Who are the Four Generations?
    • Generation X’ers
    • Born 1965 – 1980
    • 30 – 45 years old
  • Who are the Four Generations?
    • Millennials
    • Born after 1980
    • Under 30 years old
  • Differences affect us at work
    • Communication
    • Teamwork
  • Personal and Lifestyle Characteristics by Generation Veterans (1922 – 1945) Baby Boomers (1946-1964) Generation X (1965 – 1980) Millennials (1981 – 2006) Core Values Respect for authority Conformers Discipline Optimism Involvement Skepticism Fun Informality Realism Confidence Extreme fun Social Family Traditional Nuclear Disintegrating Latch-key kids Merged families Education A dream A birthright A way to get there An incredible expense Communication Media Rotary phones One-on-one Write a memo Touch-tone phones Call me anytime Cell phones Call me only at work Internet Picture phones E-mail Dealing with Money Put it away Pay cash Buy now, pay later Cautious Conservative Save, save, save Earn to spend
  • Factors that define a “Generation”
      • Family life
      • Gender roles
      • Important institutions
      • Politics
      • Religion
      • Culture
      • Lifestyle
      • Views on the future
    A generation’s identity is a state of mind shaped by … We are most influenced by our “learning years.”
  • Gen Y’s expectations of the workplace
    • Want transferable skills that support job mobility
    • Expect to have many jobs over their lifetimes
    • High value placed on engagement and attention from companies, bosses, mentors
    • Broad attention span and multitasking
    • Communicate via multiple channels
    • High use of computer games, have developed job-related skills via gaming
    • Willing to trade off between income and job demands
    • Less willing to unquestioningly adhere to “traditional” norms around the workplace
    5 From various sources, including Carolyn Martin’s and Bruce Tulgan’s work on Generation Y in the workplace.
    • 93% of US teens use the internet
    • 64% online US teens age 12-17 participate in content-creation activities
    • Content creation: it’s not just about the created objects. Discussion and social interaction are key.
    • Teens often work together to create content
    • Some teens are multi-channel “super communicators,” using multiple communications tools on a daily basis
    Gen Y teens and technology: Creating, contributing, communicating 5 From the Pew Internet and American Life Project: report on Teens and Social Media (December 2007).
  • Gen Y consumers: Mary buys a prom dress
    • Selected the dress
    • Searched for and purchased dress online
    • Used savings to purchase accessories
    • Researched dresses online
    • Visited store with friends and digital cameras, trying on dresses and taking photos
    • Uploaded photos to Facebook and asked additional friends to comment
    5 Example from the blog of the Digital Youth Research Project.
  • Gen Y “Gamer Generation” goes to work The stereotype
    • 92% of kids age 2-17 have regular access to video/computer games.
    • Gaming experience shapes their attitudes, expectations and beliefs about how the world and the workplace operate.
    • Gaming is highly social for Gen Y and part of their collective experience.
    The reality
    • Gaming develops skills that are highly applicable to knowledge work.
    5 From The Kids Are Alright: How the Gamer Generation is Changing the Workplace by John Beck and Mitchell Wade.
  • Increasing impact of technologies
    • Explosive growth in broadband
    • Cellular phones are commonplace
    • Virtual private networks (VPNs) enable secure access to corporate applications from outside the office
    • Virtual workplaces are being designed and adopted
    As technology continues to advance, new models for how, where, and when work gets done open up new possibilities. 6
  • Experts’ vision of the internet in 2020
    • Global, low-cost network available to (almost) everyone
    • Free flow of information will blur national boundaries and other traditional groups
      • Rise of region-states, “corporation-based cultural groupings” and “reconfigured human organizations tied together by global networks”
    • Humans will remain in control of the technology
      • No independent autonomous intelligent agents - yet
    • Sophisticated, compelling virtual worlds
    • Greater transparency and less privacy, with a mix of positive and negative consequences
    • English will remain common online but Mandarin (and possibly other languages) will have significant presence
    • Some people will choose to be technological “refuseniks”
    6 From the Pew Internet and American Life Project – Future of the Internet II report (September 2006).
    • Laptops are increasingly the assumed standard for personal computers.
    • Many companies say that out-of-office work is “nothing special – just part of how we do business now.”
    • Urban nomads:
      • People connected anywhere, anyplace
      • Not just for business travelers, but for people going about their daily lives in their local environment
      • A single smart device (cellphone+internet) taking the place of multiple pieces of equipment
      • Assumption that you can access your personal files from any device
    Mobile technologies are transforming work and life 6 Quote from The Telework Coalition’s Teleworking Benchmarking Study Best Practices for Large-Scale Implementation in Private and Public Sector Organizations – Executive Summary (2006). “ Urban nomads” from The Economist - Mobile Edition (April 10, 2008).
  • These six trends are converging -- causing an increasing disconnect with traditional work patterns Changing family structures Changing expectations of men Shrinking pool of skilled labor Increasing number of women in paid work Evolving expectations of Gen X and Gen Y Increasing impact of technology
  • (Some) Business leaders are responding…
    • Business challenges on the radar of future-focused C-level executives:
    • Shifts in employee skills and expectations – attracting and retaining employees
    • Shifts in customer skills and expectations -- attracting and retaining customers
    • Shifts in skills and styles for leadership – developing leaders and managers for this new workforce
    • Shifts in technologies -- impacting both the marketplace and the workplace
  • … but it won’t happen overnight. “ Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.” Folk saying, in current times attributed to Paul Saffo
  • Questions??
  • Cool Uniforms and Flying Cars: The Evolving Workforce and the Challenge to US Businesses Bill M Wooten, PhD FBLA Area V District Conference Cypress Ridge High School February 5, 2011 Thank you!