Social media: Less hype, more help Blogs, microblogs, virtual worlds, social networks … and what they mean for your busine...
Why are we talking about this stuff? Video: “Social Media Revolution 2 (Refresh),” by Erik Qualman / Socialnomics
7x=1670 4x=1890
So why are  we  here? <ul><li>Facebook: 500 million users </li></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn: 65 million users </li></ul><ul><li>T...
Teens and social media <ul><li>65-70 percent use social networking sites. </li></ul><ul><li>One in five uses Twitter. </li...
Teens and texting <ul><li>The average American teen sends about 3,000 text messages each month. </li></ul>
Our futures depend on this stuff Video: “A Vision of Students Today,” from Michael Wesch, in collaboration with 200 studen...
Boo! <ul><li>Don’t let fear drive your social media decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Inform yourself! </li></ul>
Blogs <ul><li>A Web site of news and commentary that allows readers to give feedback about what they are reading. </li></ul>
Why blog? <ul><li>Establish your company as a thought leader </li></ul><ul><li>Reinvent your marketing strategy </li></ul>...
Companies that blog have … <ul><li>55 percent more visitors to their official Web sites. </li></ul><ul><li>97 percent more...
Blogs in the classroom <ul><li>Two-way communication </li></ul><ul><li>Motivating students who may not participate in clas...
Keys to blogging success  Content … …  and commitment
Microblogging <ul><li>Blogging in miniature. </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter is the most popular example. </li></ul><ul><li>Grea...
Twitter in the classroom …  for extra credit! “ The concept is to have students thinking about accounting all the time!”  ...
Twitter in the classroom “ I wanted to find a way to incorporate more student-centered learning techniques and involve the...
Microblogging
Social networks <ul><li>Communities of people with similar interests. </li></ul><ul><li>What can you do? </li></ul><ul><li...
Social networks
Social networking (old) Social media (new) An evolution  in the way we build relationships + = Social media: The new math ...
Old school vs. new school Chambers of commerce Friends and family E-mail Class reunions Industry   meetings Newsletters
Social networks <ul><li>You can build social networks and communities around almost  anything . </li></ul>
Second Life / Virtual worlds
Second Life / Virtual worlds 80 percent of active Internet users will have a virtual world presence by 2011. - Gartner Group
<ul><li>Adidas </li></ul><ul><li>Dell </li></ul><ul><li>Toyota </li></ul><ul><li>Sun Microsystems </li></ul><ul><li>Americ...
Second Life in the classroom Ernst & Young Dr. Mike Kraten, CPA Suffolk University Dr. Steve Hornik University of Central ...
Second Life in the classroom Ernst & Young Dr. Mike Kraten, CPA Suffolk University Dr. Steve Hornik University of Central ...
Benefits of virtual worlds for education <ul><li>The sense of self. </li></ul><ul><li>The death of distance. </li></ul><ul...
The experience of virtual worlds “ In the future, as the technology continues to improve, I expect to see virtual worlds b...
“ If the Web is reshaping the world as we know it and will be the water in which the new generation of digital natives wil...
So what’s the final word? <ul><li>Rethinking, not replacing, traditional education </li></ul><ul><li>And why not? </li></ul>
Three final points … <ul><li>Stop being afraid. </li></ul><ul><li>Question everything by asking, “How can we make this mor...
Questions?
Want a copy of these slides? <ul><li>Visit www.SlideShare.net/BillSheridan </li></ul>
Social media resources <ul><li>Self-guided social media tutorial:  www.CPALearning2.com </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul>...
Social media resources <ul><li>Social networks </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook:  www.Facebook.com   </li></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn:...
Social media resources <ul><li>Podcasting </li></ul><ul><li>iTunes:  www.apple.com/itunes   (for finding and listening to ...
MACPA resources <ul><li>CPA Success, our daily blog www.CPASuccess.com </li></ul><ul><li>CPA Spotlight, our weekly podcast...
Resources <ul><li>The Corporate Blogging Book, by Debbie Weil www.TheCorporateBloggingBook.com </li></ul><ul><li>Debbie’s ...
Web 2.0: Less hype, more help <ul><li>Bill Sheridan E-Communications Manager / Editor Maryland Association of CPAs www.MAC...
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Baltimore County Public Schools, May 24, 2010: Social Media

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  • Hi, everyone. Thanks for joining me today for “Web 2.0: Less hype, more help.” I’m Bill Sheridan. I’m the e-communications manager and editor for the Maryland Association, and for a while now, part of my job has been to try to figure out how social media tools might be used to benefit our members and clients. We’ve learned a few things over the past few years, and I thought I’d share them with you today. So let ‘s get started. So why are we here? Hopefully, you signed up to learn a little bit more about Web 2.0 and what it can do for our members. -- In general, social media allow for two-way communication between yourself and your audiences – in our case, our members . -- They build community. You’re going to be hearing the word “community” a lot today. That’s really the key to social media tools. They build communities of like-minded people who want to communicate, network, share resources, ask questions, get advice, have fun with people that they have a lot in common with. That’s really what social media is all about. -- They encourage your audiences to participate and collaborate with you. They can even create new content for you. -- That’s really the key word – “collaboration.” A lot of businesses are finding it’s no longer enough to speak TO people. You have to speak WITH them, have a conversation with them. More and more businesses are finding advantages to opening up the process and their communication and turning it into a two-way street. And social media can help do that.
  • Now that was a very broad definition of Web 2.0. But let’s take a few moments to define our terms a little more specifically. Some of you may have seen this already … because it’s been viewed, oh, I don’t know, about 3 million times on YouTube already. But I love this video and I’m gonna show it to you anyway. It was created by Michael Wesch, an Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Kansas State University , and I think it kind of captures the reason we’re here today. So indulge me for a few minutes and check this out. Now, some of the text in this video is a little small and might be hard to read. I believe you have an option to enlarge the video player on your screen. You might want to go ahead and do that. So let’s take a look. It ends on kind of a philosophical note, and we’re not going to dive too deep into the philosophy or the moral dilemmas presented by Web 2.0. Rather, I want to focus on the tools that are creating all the fuss – and let you decide whether these tools might be worth exploring yourself. So let’s get started with …
  • How fast is it changing? This will give you some idea. This is an estimate from an Educational Panel at the Aspen Institute. As it relates to science and technology, the rate of change in the next decade is likely to be 4 to 7 times faster than in the previous decade. If it is 4 times faster, it would be like planning for today in 1890. If it is 7 times faster, it would be like planning for today in 1670. So now is the time to start figuring this stuff out.
  • And talk about the rate of change: Facebook has nearly half a billion active users, making it, in terms of population, the third largest nation on earth. It passed the United States on that list sometime in October, and it’s adding about 800,000 new users per day. As that video at the beginning noted, it added 200 million users in less than a year. LinkedIn is still growing quickly. Some estimates claim that one new member joins LinkedIn every second or so. It’s audience is, by some accounts, the world&apos;s largest audience of influential, affluent professionals. The average household income per user is around $109,000, much higher than the other social networks. Twitter’s growth has actually slowed or even declined a bit from its staggering rise last year. But that might be a good thing. The people who do use it follow substantially more people, are followed by many more people, and post more updates than they did in mid-2009, according to HubSpot. For example, last July, the average user had about 60 followers; by January 2010, that number had jumped to 300. Ning, Plaxo, MySpace – they’re all trending upward. And all these people? They’re our friends, our co-workers, our students and members. 96 percent of millennials have joined a social network, but the fastest growing demographic on Facebook: 55- to 65-year-old females. EVERYONE is there. Why should we consider using social media? There’s the answer – the people we interact with are using it. If we don’t keep up, they’re going to figure out ways to collaborate and connect without us. And where will we be then?
  • Let’s talk about our future members, our future employees, our future clients for a minute. Here are some stats from Pew Internet and the American Life project about how our future members are using social media. Between 65 and 70 percent of them use social networking sites. That’s compared to 35 percent of all online adults. About 20 percent of them use Twitter. That doesn’t sound like a lot, but by comparison, 10 percent of those 35 to 44 and 5 percent of those 45 to 54. What’s funny is that if you ask these kids how good they are with technology, they&apos;ll rate themselves as very low – not very good at all. With them, it’s not about the technology. There’s an old saying: Once technology becomes ubiquitous, it also becomes invisible. And that’s what’s happening here.
  • That’s somewhere around 100 messages each day. According to Pew Internet and the American Life project: -- 54 percent text daily. -- 15 percent send more than 200 per day. The average adult sends about 10 texts per day. In fact, text messaging has become the most frequent way that teens reach their friends, surpassing face-to-face meetings, e-mail, instant messaging and voice-calling as a daily communications tool.
  • Let’s take it a step further. I want to share with you a video that focuses specifically on students and the state of education today. It raises some interesting points and raises some pretty tough questions. Are we be ready to educate today’s students, tomorrow’s students, in ways that will give them the best possible chance of succeeding? And if we are not, what will be the consequences?
  • Let’s start with a question: For those of you who work for a company that is exploring social media, why is your company doing so? What are the benefits? Improved communication, perhaps. Publicity. Community-building. Building your brand. For those of you who aren’t using social media?, why not? Might it have something to do with this? I’ve talked to a lot of people in the association world, anyway, whose organizations are downright afraid of this stuff. And, no matter what you think about Web 2.0, I’m here to tell you that fear should NEVER drive your decisions on whether to do this or not. Social media are lot of things, but they’re not something you should be afraid of.
  • So, let’s start defining our terms. First of all, what is a blog? “Blog” is short for “Web log.” They are Web sites of news and commentary that allow readers to give feedback about what they are reading. So many people still consider blogs a new technology. But believe it or not, blogs have been around for more 12 years. They are an accepted form of communication – and more and more often, they are an expected form of communication. Ignore them at your own peril, because they are here to stay.
  • Establish your company as a thought leader. We’re all experts in something. Blogs give you the opportunity to share that expertise with large audiences – and communicate directly with that audience. We can use blogs to create niche content that promotes our expertise … and, at the same time, our businesses. Informative, thought-provoking blog posts about issues that your audiences care about tend to spread quickly throughout the blogosphere. And, because of the great search engine results blogs receive, you will drive traffic to your company. Reinvent your marketing and communications strategy. With blogs, you can: -- Bypass the media and take your message directly to the public -- and get feedback in the process. It provides real-time communication with your audiences – and that includes not only current and potential customers, but their clients, investors, and don’t forget employees. A lot of blogs are being used very effectively as internal communications tools. -- Great way to quickly publish company news in real time, and to get that news out to the world quickly. Blogs are known as search engine darlings. Search results are dominated by blogs. It’s amazing the kind of traffic you can push to your site through search engines. And because of that, you can bypass normal channels to get the word out. You no longer have to write a press release and hope the media run it. You can publish it yourself. -- Blogs can be great marketing tools … as long as the content is not blatant marketing. Blog readers are a finicky bunch and, as a rule, they don’t like to read sales pitches. Build communities and improve customer relations. The readerships of successful corporate blogs include engaged customers or potential customers who are passionate about your company and its products and services. Blogs often turn readers in champions for your company – especially if you’re giving them content that they care about and that they can’t get anywhere else. Next is the notion of control. Right now, you have none. People are talking about your company RIGHT NOW, and you don&apos;t even know it. But with blogs, and specifically with the “Comments” feature, you can join the conversation and get your messaging out. It gives you an element of control over the conversation that you didn’t have before. -- Ability to quickly address positive and negative feedback. -- Market research: Gather feedback from customers, other key constituencies. Posting questions to your blog and gauging reactions by seeing how your readers are answering those questions. And it doesn’t cost anything. Market research is notoriously expensive, so this might be a way to get actionable results at a fraction of the cost. Enhance legislative advocacy, especially among non-profits. Example: The MACPA – www.CPAlegislativeinsider.com. Lots of other associations are doing similar things as well. Expand your brand. If people like your blog, they’re going to tell others about it. More people are going to know your and what you do.
  • And then there’s this: Because the search engines love blogs so much, companies that blog have: -- 55 percent more visitors to their Web sites. -- 97 percent more links to their Web sites, which is a primary factor in where your Web site shows up in search results. (Want a higher ranking, get quality links to your site). -- 434 percent more indexed pages. – this is the number of pages that show up in search engines. Bottom line: Having a effective, well-written blog with fresh, relevant content will help your company get found. Many, many more people will know who you are.
  • Now, onto blogs. The big question is: How would we use blogs in our classrooms? That’s still up for debate, but, here are some ideas from Laura Losch. She’s a media specialist at South Hall Middle School in Georgia.
  • Keys to blogging success. Content. It starts and ends here. If you don’t write something worth reading, nothing else matters. Commitment. Creating a blog is easy … it literally takes about 5 minutes. The hard part is maintaining it and making it succeed. Technorati estimates there are nearly 113 million blogs in existence today. That sounds impressive, but what it really means – to me, anyway – is that there’s a lot of garbage out there in the blogosphere. The great blogs are rare, because they take a lot of hard work. But the payoffs can be substantial.
  • -- Blogging in miniature. -- Twitter is the most popular example: Posts are limited to 140 or fewer characters. -- You “follow” the updates of only the people you choose. So you don’t have to read what everyone is writing. When you’re logged in, you’ll see only the updates of the people who are important to you. -- You can receive updates online, on your smart phones as text messages, and even feed them into your Web site or blog. -- Great for quick-hitting, real-time alerts and announcements. -- And a lot of it is being done via mobile devices. Examples: A lot of news organizations are posting breaking news on Twitter before that news is available anywhere else. The earthquake in Haiti. There were people there, on the ground in Haiti, posting updates and photos via Twitter. And this was information that wasn’t available anywhere else. Elections, the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai, the plane landing on the Hudson -- any type of breaking news event, you’re likely to read about it first on Twitter, because the people on the scene become the reporters.
  • First up is Dr. Steven Hornik of the University of Central Florida. He uses Twitter in his Financial Accounting Class as a way of generating extra credit. He has set up a Twitter account just for his course, and he sends out random extra credit questions throughout the week. He then awards extra credit to the first so many students who respond with the correct answer.
  • Next up, there’s Monica Ranking, a history professor at the University of Texas at Dallas. She uses a weekly hashtag to organize comments posted by students to Twitter during class. Rankin then projects a giant image of live Tweets in the front of the class for discussion and suggests that students refer back to the messages later when studying. Here’s a brief video that explains how she is using it.
  • How might businesses use it? Internally, by posting updates that are important to your staff or team. Conferences is a great example. It’s a great communications tool. By posting important corporate news and updates that your followers would be interested in. Marketers are absolutely in LOVE with Twitter. By getting feedback or asking questions. Twitter is great for getting opinions. By listening to what people are saying about you, and responding. Networking, networking, networking. And there are some great third-party applications that really bring Twitter to life by helping you search for topics or people, post photos, post and answer messages from your desktop, and more. These applications really give Twitter its power. Twitter promotes itself with the tagline, “What are you doing?” But when you use Twitter for business, it might be better to tell people what you’re thinking. Look for like-minded business folks and network with them. Ask questions, share resources and have fun! I think you’ll find it’s a very powerful and addictive tool. And best of all, it’s free. For now.
  • Next up, we have social networks. These are nothing more than online communities of like-minded people. Facebook and MySpace are the most well-known examples, but there are some professional networking sites out there to help people build their on-the-job networks as well. I particularly like LinkedIn. It’s like Facebook for working adults. You can upload job histories, share professional recommendations, join job-related “groups” in which you can network, ask and answer questions, share resources and more. And don’t underestimate their power. According to some estimates, Facebook has more than 500 million users, MySpace has about 200 million users, LinkedIn has around 65 million users and Plaxo has between 20 and 30 million users. So how are educators using these networks? Some are trying them out as a way to collect feedback, to communicate with students and fellow teachers, for classroom collaboration, as a warehouse of classroom resources, for research, to form study groups. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Think of all the ways educators and students collaborate right now, and you can do that on an expanded scale with a social network like Facebook. And these networks all play nice with other social media. Anything you do in other social arenas, you can feed that content into your social networks as well. They all play very well together.
  • Educators themselves are using social networks as collaboration tools. These are just a few of the countless educator-related groups on Facebook. -- Primary Teachers: 61,300 members -- Teachers: 4,300 members -- Have Fun Teaching: 3,500 members -- Educators Using Facebook: 1,824 members -- And the granddaddy of them all: Facebook in Education, with 274,797 members, as of Saturday. So as you can see, there are plenty of educators out there trying to figure this stuff out.
  • You can build social networks and communities around almost anything. 1. Flickr is a photo-sharing site. You can share your photos with friends, family and photographers with similar tastes. You can comment on photos, tag them to help organize them, and turn them into cool stuff like calendars, business cards, coffee mugs … whatever. And Flickr’s not the only one out there. Others include Zoomr, Fotki, PhotoBucket and SmugMug. 2. We’ve all probably heard of YouTube by now. It’s a hugely popular video-sharing site. Users can upload their own videos, share them with friends, post comments and ratings, download and embed videos in their Web sites and blogs. And then you have what San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom has done. Have you heard about this? Mayor Newsom has created what he calls an “interactive state of the city.” Most state-of-the-city addresses are about an hour long or less and touch briefly on a bunch of different topics. Well, Mayor Newsom decided he wasn’t going to have limits like that put on his address. So he has created 10 YouTube videos, each of which focuses on a different area – health care, education, the environment, etc. All together, the videos total 7 and a half hours, and viewers can choose to watch a little or a lot. No one’s gonna edit this guy – not when he has the power of Web 2.0 at his fingertips. He has something to say and he’s gonna say it all. The only thing I don’t like is that it appears he is not letting viewers comment on the videos, which kind of defeats the purpose, if you ask me. But he’s thinking, and that’s cool. 3. You can even build communities around PowerPoint presentations and other slideshows – share them, comment and rate them, network with people with similar interests.
  • Which brings us to Second Life and virtual worlds. If you’re not familiar with the concept, virtual worlds allow you to create a virtual version of yourself, called an “avatar,” and interact with people from all over the world. In Second Life, the users create all of the content you see – buildings, clothing, landscape, products. Second Life has its own currency, called the Linden dollar, and users can buy and sell virtual products and trade Lindens on the Lindex, Second Life’s virtual exchange. It’s a virtual economy, but people are making real money there. Virtual worlds are no game. And if you’re looking for a reason why you should take it seriously, consider this:
  • Those are your customers, clients, members and employees we’re talking about.
  • Who’s there, beside a LOT of weirdos? Well, there are a bunch of reputable businesses there. Here are just a handful. And what are some of the possible business applications? -- Simulations of RL products and services. Starwood Hotels and its Aloft Hotel. -- Networking and community, especially for membership organizations and internal applications. -- Entertainment -- Brand expansion -- Education, education, education
  • Next, there’s Second Life. Who is educating successfully in Second Life? Let’s start with Ernst &amp; Young. The firm has built a virtual cookie factory in Second Life, and they’re using that factory to teach young CPAs things like how to do an inventory count. They asked them questions like: Do the cookies baking in the oven count? What about the bags of wet and damaged flour in the storeroom? The idea was to help them understand the kinds of real-world situations that they might run. And previously, they had to do that in a 2-dimensional environment – with books. Now, in 3D, they can actually SEE these concepts and develop a deeper understanding as a result. Let’s talk about Dr. Michael Kraten from Suffolk University. He found Ben and Jerry&apos;s facility in Second Life, and now he can take his students on a tour of Ben and Jerry’s and talk about real concepts, and see the process of raw material to work in progress to finished goods -- and talk about the accounting issues that come up along the way. These are things that are hard to grasp in a 2D environment. The virtual world allows you to create those environments in a much cheaper way.
  • Dr. Steve Hornick of the University of Central Florida has created a 3D accounting model in Second Life so they can actually SEE the concepts, rather than just read about them. The other neat thing about SL is you can bring in speakers from all over the world to speak to students without paying for travel. Our events -- XBRL, etc., with XBRL experts Mike Willis and Eric Cohen. Dr. Kraten has brought in a gentleman from China to talk to his class. Bob Tarola, a Maryland finance expert and MACPA member, has visited Dr. Kraten’s Suffolk &amp;quot;classroom“ via Second Life You can expose these students to thought leaders throughout the world and can interact much better than a conference call. Mike Kraten story: He has taken his students on virtual tours of fortune 500 companies. He can take his students on a tour of a big corporate office so they can get a taste of what it&apos;s like to work there without even leaving the classroom.
  • I look at the top 3 as related. In fact, we received an e-mail from Dr. Kraten just recently. He passed along a terrific story from an IRS agent by the name of Peter Kuczynski, who teaches a tax course at night at Sacred Heart University. Mr. Kuczynski has spent some time exploring Second Life on his own, and here’s his story, in his own words: “ I was going to hold a review session on campus with two students. I had considered inviting the rest of my class but thought that many might not come because they either did not want to travel to campus, or did not want to be inconvenienced.  “ That was when I asked if it would be possible for me to hold my review session on CPA Island. I thought it to be a solution to many problems I was encountering, and offered many benefits to my students. I was glad to have introduced them to both CPA Island and a new medium of communication. I believe at least half of my class; approximately 15 students were in attendance during my review.  “ One of the most surprising things that occurred during the review session is that I was able to extract an immense amount of class participation. It is extremely difficult to get a student to raise a hand, or offer an answer in class due to possible embarrassment, fear, disruption, or labeling that may occur in a physical classroom. However, when I asked a question during my review session, I was immediately responded to with several typed responses from my students within seconds! This was a tremendous improvement in student participation simply due to choice of venue! The students were also extremely grateful for the opportunity to attend my review session from the comforts of their homes and to be better prepared for their upcoming exam. They thought it to be a great experience.”
  • I have a colleague who offered very similar views recently. Chris Jenkins from the Ohio Society of CPAs. Now, in interest of full disclosure, Chris is not a big fan of Second Life. But he does see it as a step toward the virtualization of the Web. Here’s how he sees the Web evolving: 1. Web 1.0: Static information. We post it, you read it. QED. 2. Web 2.0: The social Web. Interaction, communities, Web users creating the content. 3. Web 3.0: The semantic Web, where all information has meaning. If Web 2.0 connects people to people, Web 3.0 connects people to everything. 4. Web 4.0: From Chris Jenkins: &amp;quot;The virtual Web, where your everyday life is mimicked in a virtual world. As you travel, your avatar will follow like a shadow in the virtual world. It becomes possible to do electronic social networking as you walk down the street. When you enter a store or restaurant, you can be connected to others with like interest. You will be virtually introduced. If you are low on milk and pass a grocery store, your device will alert you to stop on your way home. This is why Second Life is a great beta but not the end solution. Hardware and bandwidth must create a lifelike experience that will allow for alternate input and a more robust communication platform. Once the hardware catches up, the mainstream will follow.“ And the hardware will catch up. Which leads us back to Gartner’s prediction. John Z. also looks at Second Life as today’s e-mail. In 1992, no one had an e-mail address. Now everyone does.
  • So what’s the final word? Well, most importantly, I think, it this: Social media will never replace classroom instruction. Instead, I think what many educators are thinking about is how to use social media to improve the classroom experience. Next is this: If you could figure out a way to improve participation, to improve the delivery of content, to increase creativity and turn our classrooms into communities, would you do it? These are the things that social media does really well. People are finding some really innovative ways of putting social media to use. Maybe it’s education’s turn.
  • And three final points from Jeff De Cagna, founder of Principled Innovation and one of the most forward thinkers in this space that I know.
  • Baltimore County Public Schools, May 24, 2010: Social Media

    1. 1. Social media: Less hype, more help Blogs, microblogs, virtual worlds, social networks … and what they mean for your business Bill Sheridan E-Communications Manager / Editor Maryland Association of CPAs
    2. 2. Why are we talking about this stuff? Video: “Social Media Revolution 2 (Refresh),” by Erik Qualman / Socialnomics
    3. 3. 7x=1670 4x=1890
    4. 4. So why are we here? <ul><li>Facebook: 500 million users </li></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn: 65 million users </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: 20 million users … or so </li></ul>… and growing.
    5. 5. Teens and social media <ul><li>65-70 percent use social networking sites. </li></ul><ul><li>One in five uses Twitter. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not technology. </li></ul>Source: Pew Internet and American Life project report
    6. 6. Teens and texting <ul><li>The average American teen sends about 3,000 text messages each month. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Our futures depend on this stuff Video: “A Vision of Students Today,” from Michael Wesch, in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University
    8. 8. Boo! <ul><li>Don’t let fear drive your social media decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Inform yourself! </li></ul>
    9. 9. Blogs <ul><li>A Web site of news and commentary that allows readers to give feedback about what they are reading. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Why blog? <ul><li>Establish your company as a thought leader </li></ul><ul><li>Reinvent your marketing strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Build communities and improve customer relations </li></ul><ul><li>Control </li></ul><ul><li>Expand your brand </li></ul>
    11. 11. Companies that blog have … <ul><li>55 percent more visitors to their official Web sites. </li></ul><ul><li>97 percent more links to their Web sites. </li></ul><ul><li>434 percent more indexed pages. </li></ul>Source: HubSpot
    12. 12. Blogs in the classroom <ul><li>Two-way communication </li></ul><ul><li>Motivating students who may not participate in classroom discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Assignments all in one place </li></ul><ul><li>Students’ own opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom management (assigning homework, posting lessons) </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration (teachers working with students on writing skills) </li></ul>More examples: www.SpeedOfCreativity.org/resources/classroom-blogs/
    13. 13. Keys to blogging success Content … … and commitment
    14. 14. Microblogging <ul><li>Blogging in miniature. </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter is the most popular example. </li></ul><ul><li>Great for quick-hitting, real-time alerts, announcements. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Twitter in the classroom … for extra credit! “ The concept is to have students thinking about accounting all the time!” Dr. Steven Hornik, University of Central Florida <ul><li>Twitter.com/acg2021 </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter.com/shornik </li></ul>
    16. 16. Twitter in the classroom “ I wanted to find a way to incorporate more student-centered learning techniques and involve the students more fully into the material.“ Monica Ranking, University of Texas at Dallas history professor
    17. 17. Microblogging
    18. 18. Social networks <ul><li>Communities of people with similar interests. </li></ul><ul><li>What can you do? </li></ul><ul><li>Share resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan / organize events. </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate. </li></ul><ul><li>Network. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Social networks
    20. 20. Social networking (old) Social media (new) An evolution in the way we build relationships + = Social media: The new math Source: Matt Goddard, CEO, R2integrated
    21. 21. Old school vs. new school Chambers of commerce Friends and family E-mail Class reunions Industry meetings Newsletters
    22. 22. Social networks <ul><li>You can build social networks and communities around almost anything . </li></ul>
    23. 23. Second Life / Virtual worlds
    24. 24. Second Life / Virtual worlds 80 percent of active Internet users will have a virtual world presence by 2011. - Gartner Group
    25. 25. <ul><li>Adidas </li></ul><ul><li>Dell </li></ul><ul><li>Toyota </li></ul><ul><li>Sun Microsystems </li></ul><ul><li>American Apparel </li></ul><ul><li>The city of St. Louis </li></ul><ul><li>IBM </li></ul><ul><li>Starwood </li></ul><ul><li>Reuters </li></ul><ul><li>CNET Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Yankee Stadium </li></ul><ul><li>Harvard (and 200+ other schools) </li></ul><ul><li>H&R Block </li></ul><ul><li>MACPA </li></ul>Who’s there?
    26. 26. Second Life in the classroom Ernst & Young Dr. Mike Kraten, CPA Suffolk University Dr. Steve Hornik University of Central Florida
    27. 27. Second Life in the classroom Ernst & Young Dr. Mike Kraten, CPA Suffolk University Dr. Steve Hornik University of Central Florida
    28. 28. Benefits of virtual worlds for education <ul><li>The sense of self. </li></ul><ul><li>The death of distance. </li></ul><ul><li>The power of presence, sense of space and capacity to co-create. </li></ul><ul><li>The pervasiveness of practice. </li></ul><ul><li>The enrichment of experience. </li></ul>VW Sensibilities - eLearn Magazine Another Life: Virtual Worlds as Tools for Learning, Jay Cross – eLearning Magazine
    29. 29. The experience of virtual worlds “ In the future, as the technology continues to improve, I expect to see virtual worlds become immersive experiences that are difficult to differentiate from the real world.” -- John Zdanowski, CFO, Linden Lab
    30. 30. “ If the Web is reshaping the world as we know it and will be the water in which the new generation of digital natives will swim, then it behooves all of us to understand its implications.” David Sibbet, The Grove Consultants International
    31. 31. So what’s the final word? <ul><li>Rethinking, not replacing, traditional education </li></ul><ul><li>And why not? </li></ul>
    32. 32. Three final points … <ul><li>Stop being afraid. </li></ul><ul><li>Question everything by asking, “How can we make this more social?” </li></ul><ul><li>Re-orient toward the future. </li></ul>Source: Jeff De Cagna, Principled Innovation
    33. 33. Questions?
    34. 34. Want a copy of these slides? <ul><li>Visit www.SlideShare.net/BillSheridan </li></ul>
    35. 35. Social media resources <ul><li>Self-guided social media tutorial: www.CPALearning2.com </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>www.TypePad.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.WordPress.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.BlogLines.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.Blogger.com </li></ul><ul><li>Microblogging </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: www.Twitter.com </li></ul><ul><li>Twhirl: www.Twhirl.org </li></ul><ul><li>TweetDeck: www.TweetDeck.com </li></ul><ul><li>TwitterBerry: www.orangatame.com/products/twitterberry/ </li></ul><ul><li>SocialScope: www.SocialScope.net </li></ul><ul><li>Tweetie: www.atebits.com/tweetie-iphone/ </li></ul><ul><li>TwitterFon: www.TwitterFon.net </li></ul>
    36. 36. Social media resources <ul><li>Social networks </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook: www.Facebook.com </li></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn: www.LinkedIn.com </li></ul><ul><li>Plaxo: www.Plaxo.com </li></ul><ul><li>HubStreet: www.HubStreet.com (a new one for CPAs and lawyers) </li></ul><ul><li>Multimedia sharing sites </li></ul><ul><li>YouTube: www.YouTube.com (videos) </li></ul><ul><li>Flickr: www.Flickr.com (photos) </li></ul><ul><li>Picasa: Picasa.Google.com (photos) </li></ul><ul><li>SlideShare: www.Slideshare.com (slidedecks) </li></ul>
    37. 37. Social media resources <ul><li>Podcasting </li></ul><ul><li>iTunes: www.apple.com/itunes (for finding and listening to podcasts) </li></ul><ul><li>Audacity: audacity.sourceforge.net (for recording / editing podcasts) </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>PB Wiki: www.PBWiki.com </li></ul><ul><li>WikiSpaces: www.WikiSpaces.com </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual worlds </li></ul><ul><li>Second Life: www.SecondLife.com </li></ul><ul><li>CPAs on Second Life: www.CPAIsland.com </li></ul>
    38. 38. MACPA resources <ul><li>CPA Success, our daily blog www.CPASuccess.com </li></ul><ul><li>CPA Spotlight, our weekly podcast www.macpa.org/podcast </li></ul><ul><li>Other MACPA blogs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.CPALegislativeInsider.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.NewCPAs.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.TCPAblog.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CPA Learning 2, a Web 2.0 playground www.CPALearning2.com </li></ul>
    39. 39. Resources <ul><li>The Corporate Blogging Book, by Debbie Weil www.TheCorporateBloggingBook.com </li></ul><ul><li>Debbie’s blog, www.BlogWriteforCEOs.com </li></ul><ul><li>MACPA social networks: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Twitter: Twitter.com/MACPA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook: Facebook.com/MACPA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/groups?gid153466 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flickr: Flickr.com/groups/MACPA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>YouTube: YouTube.com/THoodCPA </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Second Life resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CPAs on Second Life: www.SLACPA.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CPA Island: www.CPAIsland.com </li></ul></ul>
    40. 40. Web 2.0: Less hype, more help <ul><li>Bill Sheridan E-Communications Manager / Editor Maryland Association of CPAs www.MACPA.org [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Follow me on: </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: Twitter.com/BillSheridan </li></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/in/BillSheridan1 </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook: Facebook.com/BillSheridan </li></ul>
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