Sources of secondary metabolite variation in dysidea avara the importance of having good neighbors

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Sources of secondary metabolite variation in dysidea avara the importance of having good neighbors

  1. 1. Sources of Secondary Metabolite Variation in Dysidea avara: The Importance of Having Good Neighbors Mar. Drugs 2013, 11, 489-503 Published: 18 February 2013 Sonia De Caralt, Delphine Bry, Nataly Bontemps,Xavier Turon, Maria-Jesus Uriz and Bernard Banaigs 報告學⽣生:彭毅弘 指導⽼老師:陳俊宏 2013.3.26
  2. 2. 2Report ProcedureIntroduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions
  3. 3. 3Introduction
  4. 4. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Sponges v.s Terrestrial systems 4 Marine invertebrates, especially sponges, are a prolific source of novel secondary metabolites with pharmacological applications Many studies targeting marine sponges have established parallels with studies on plants in terrestrial systems.
  5. 5. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Model organism: Dysidea avara 5 http://www.natuurlijkmooi.net/adriatische_zee/sponzen/dysidea_avara.htm
  6. 6. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Model organism: Dysidea avara 6 Dysidea avara is a common Mediterranean sublittoral demosponge that produces the sesquiterpene hydroquinone avarol
  7. 7. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Temporal Variation of Metabolites 7 Minor 5′-monoacetylavarol Major Avarol (R - H) Structure of compounds from D. avara
  8. 8. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Traditional view point: “trade-off” in resources 8 Optimal Defence Theory: Secretion of secondary organisms’ defence matabolites depends on the trade-off in resource allocation between the organisms’ defence and their trade-off primary biological functions such as reproduction and/or growth primary biological functions: reproduction and/or growth
  9. 9. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Hypothesis 9 Time Change Temperature Change Optimal Defence Theory organisms’ defence Secondary Metabolite reproduction and/ or growth
  10. 10. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions The aim of this work was to...... 10 1 Study temporal and intra-individual variability of avarol yields in a population of Dysidea avara from the NW Mediterranean Sea 2 Search for biotic and abiotic factors related to this variability Is the hypothesis right? What’s the benefit?
  11. 11. 11Experimental Section
  12. 12. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Sampling 12 NW Mediterranean sea 1 temporal variability 10 individuals once a month over 2 years presence of brooded embryos verifying by stereomicroscope 2 intra-individual variation in production sampled 90 individuals in June 2010
  13. 13. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Sampling 13 NW Mediterranean sea 1 temporal variability 10 individuals once a month over 2 years presence of brooded embryos verifying by stereomicroscope 2 intra-individual variation in production sampled 90 individuals in June 2010
  14. 14. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Sampling 14 NW Mediterranean sea 1 temporal variability 10 individuals once a month over 2 years presence of brooded embryos verifying by stereomicroscope 2 intra-individual variation in production sampled 90 individuals in June 2010
  15. 15. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions B HPLC Analysis and Quantification 15 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) injection
  16. 16. 16Results2.1. Temporal Variation of Metabolites
  17. 17. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A The time course 17 The time course of the concentrations of the two metabolites
  18. 18. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A The time course 18 avarol The time course of the concentrations of the two metabolites 5’-monoacetylavarol
  19. 19. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A The time course: reproductive period 19 reproductive period
  20. 20. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A The time course: statistically significant 20 statistically significa nt differences
  21. 21. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions B Seasonal Pattern 21 Both compounds followed approximately the same seasonal pattern. Significant differences between months were found for both metabolites.
  22. 22. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions B Seasonal Pattern: avarol 22
  23. 23. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions B Seasonal Pattern: 5’-monoacetylavarol 23
  24. 24. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Autocorrelation plots: avarol 24 Cross-correlation analyses of avarol concentration versus temperature 95% CI Correlation Time Lag
  25. 25. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Autocorrelation plots: avarol 25 95% CI Secretion % 1 2 3 4 5 6 Correlation 1 2 3 4 5 6 Temperature Time Lag
  26. 26. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Autocorrelation plots: avarol 26 95% CI Secretion % 1 2 3 4 5 6 Correlation 1 2 3 4 5 6 Temperature Time Lag
  27. 27. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Autocorrelation plots: avarol 27 95% CI Secretion % 1 2 3 4 5 6 Correlation 1 2 3 4 5 6 Temperature Time Lag
  28. 28. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Autocorrelation plots: avarol 28 Cross-correlation analyses of avarol concentration versus temperature 95% CI Correlation Time Lag
  29. 29. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Autocorrelation plots: 5’-monoacetyl avarol 29 Cross-correlation analyses of 5’-monoacetyl avarol concentration versus temperature 95% CI Correlation Time Lag
  30. 30. 30Results2.2. Intra-Individual Variation of Metabolites
  31. 31. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Average percentage of avarol and 5’-monoacetylavarol 31 mg of the secondary metabolite mg of sponge dry weight central part periphery zones peripheral zones of the sponges in contact in close contact with with algae other invertebrates
  32. 32. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions B Average percentage of avarol 32 Kruskal-Wallis test No significant differences ?
  33. 33. 33Discussion
  34. 34. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions The aim of this work was to...... 34 1 Study temporal and intra-individual variability of avarol yields in a population of Dysidea avara from the NW Mediterranean Sea 2 Search for biotic and abiotic factors related to this variability Is the hypothesis right? What’s the benefit?
  35. 35. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Species-specific factors affect the metabolite production 35 Previous Understanding: production of secondary metabolites: trade-off organisms’ defence in resource allocation. trade-off That is not true! 3 reasons: 1 2 3 primary biological functions: reproduction and/or growth
  36. 36. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Species-specific factors affect the metabolite production 36 1 No relationship existed with current temperature and with temperature in the preceding months.
  37. 37. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Species-specific factors affect the metabolite production 37 2 Highest concentrations derivative coincided with the brooding period No negative relationship with reproduction could be substantiated
  38. 38. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Species-specific factors affect the metabolite production 38 3 Minima of metabolite concentration: autumn of 2009 But!! Minimal values not repeated in the second year. Sympatric sponge: the highest values of toxicity were found in autumn
  39. 39. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Species-specific factors affect the metabolite production 39 3 Minima of metabolite concentration: autumn of 2009 But!! Minimal values not repeated in the second year. Sympatric sponge: the highest values of toxicity were found in autumn
  40. 40. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions A Species-specific factors affect the metabolite production 40 From 1 2 3 The need of long-term studies of metabolite variation in a range of species The existence of species- specific factors that could affect the metabolite production in sponges.
  41. 41. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions B Sponge defences can be locally induced 41 The lack of a consistent in 1 temporal trend 2 intra- and inter-individual 3 central and peripheral zones sponge defences can be locally induced to some extent Opens new possibilities to enhance metabolite production in this species for which culture methods have been developed.
  42. 42. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions C Metabolite with allelopathic role 42 Avarol is a metabolite with an allelopathic role in space competition with long-lived invertebrates. Other functions of avarol cannot be excluded.
  43. 43. 43Conclusions
  44. 44. Introduction Experimental Section Results Discussion Conclusions Conclusions & Take Home Massage 44 1 A natural variation in the amount of avarol appears to be intrinsic to the species but modulated by the nature of the neighbors in close contact, which makes it difficult to outline a consistent temporal pattern. 2 The type of organisms in close contact with the target species should be considered in temporal surveys 3 This finding opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite supply in sponge cultures by developing experimental settings that incorporate interactions with competing species.
  45. 45. 45Acknowledgement感謝陳俊宏⽼老師指導感謝頡仁、彝禎、穎驊聆聽預講感謝靳宗洛⽼老師、施秀慧⽼老師、⾼高⽂文媛⽼老師提供建議感謝各位同學的聆聽!
  46. 46. Thanks for Listening! 46

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